Skip to main content

Full text of "La Vie Collegienne: Lebanon Valley College Student Newspaper (Spring 1928)"

See other formats


VI 



LEST WE FORGET! 
EXAMS JAN. 30. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



or 

x 




^trrz — 

THEREE CHE^ilfs £jL 
FOR THE CHAPEL. <V 



VOLUME TIT 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, JANUARY, 19, 1928. 



NUMBER 7 



CLIONIANS' FIFTY-SEVENTH 



TO BE GIVEN ON SATURDAY 



BASKETBA 
W 



Program of Typical Clionian Excellence to Be Ginven In 
New Chapel — Reception In 
North Hall 



After quite a few disappointments, 
among which the delay in the com- 
pletion of the Conservatory figured 
largely, Clio has at last set January 
21 as the definite date to hold its 
Fifty-seventh Anniversary. This pro- 
longation of time had its advantages 
however, in that the program prom- 
ises to be better and more unique 
than ever. The L&kih directed by Miss 
Wallace, have been working hard for 
some time and their enthusiasm as- 
sures a success. 

Clio has two new advantages in 
presenting this program. First of 
all the chapel will just have been 
completed and will add beauty and 
freshness to the plays. Really, the 
atmosphere will be entirely altered 
by the change that has taken place 
by the remodeling of Engle Hall. 
Then too there will be a change of re- 
ception halls Clio will be the first to 
experiment with the novel idea of 
(Continued on Page 3) 



PROFS ARE BUSY 
DURING VACATION 

Professors Shenk, Reynolds and 
Butterwick Attend Meetings 
In Various Places 



Contrary to the opinions that man/ 
students have, the faculty does prac- 
tice what it preaches. Several of the 
professors not only gave injunctions 
to spend the Christmas vacation to 
£ood advantage but they used their 
time to good purposes. 

Among this number was Prof. 
Shenk who attended the annual ses- 
sion of the American Historical As- 
sociation at Washington. On his wav 
Tie stopped at Baltimore and visited 
Prof. Bruce Reddit, formerly Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics at Lebanon 
Valley, and now taking graduate 
Work at Johns Hopkins. Prof Reddit 
occupies the chair of Mathematics at 
Kenyon College, Ohio. 

Prof. Shenk spent considerable time 
in the Library of Congress during his 
stay at Washington, looking over the 
letters and papers of Thaddeus Stev- 
ens. Prof. Shenk is preparing to edit 
these papers and letters. 

(Continued on Page t) 



READERS DISCUSS 

ERSKINE'S NOVELS 

A meeting of the Readers Club was 
held at the home of Dr. and Mrs. P. 
A - W. Wallaace on Thursday evening, 
•W 12, 1928 at 7:30. The following 
Program on John Erskine was given: 

"Private Life of Helen of Troy", by 
Esther Kauffman, Dorothy Kleinfel- 
ter ; "Galahad'', by Leah Harpel. 
^ancy Ulrich; "Adam and. Eve", r»y 
Dannie Silber, Frances Hammond. 

The program for January 26 is 
° n Hugh Walpole. 

"Cathedral", by Dorothy Boyer, 
5 ae Hamer; "Harmer John", and 
" J «remy at Crole", by James Wallace, 
Ja nies Hazelton. 



MENS' GLEE CLUB 
PLANS YEARS WORK 

Several Concerts Already Ar- 
ranged — Prof. Crawford To 
Accompany Club 

The Men's Glee Club is working 
hard on their unique and interesting 
program which will be rendered on 
their annual tour to many towns and 
cities. 

The program this year will be quite 
different from that of previous years. 
Songs will again be given in groups 
consisting of three or four numbers 
each. Although the program has not 
been definitly arranged some of the 
numbers to be sung by the club are: 
"Skit", A Girl to Order',' "Blind 
Ploughman", "Sanctus", "The Lost 
Chord", "Haste lo the Bower of Robin 
Hood", "Wanderer's Night Song", 
"Hunter's Farewell", "Lamp of the 
West", "Murmuring Zephyrs", "Peg- 
ay", "Top-O-Mornin' " and "The 
Spirit of Music." There will also be 
piano solos, readings and sketch. 

For several years the club has bee-i 
t^veling and giving its programs 
without the assistance of the directoi 
but this year they expect Prof. Craw- 
ford to accompany them on their 
trips. 

The Business Manager, 0. P. Boll- 
inger, announces that quite a few 
dates have alread been secured and 
that he expects to soon have definite 
arrangements for the twenty con- 
certs which the club is allowed to 
give. Definite engagements for con- 
certs have been made at Washington, 
Tower City, Baltimore, Lykens, Pine 
Grove, Reading and Lebanon. 



RIFLE CLUB 



REORGANIZES 



Gelbert Is Made President A' 
Local Club Plans For This 
Year's Activities 

The Rifle Club of L. V. C. was 
called to order by the former execu- 
tive officer, Uhl Kuhn, on Tuesday, 
Jan. 10 for the purpose of reorgani- 
zation. After speeches by members 
of the faculty, Dr. Wagner, Dr. Wal- 
lace, and Prof. Martin, expressing 
their sympathy and cooperation with 
the club, the following officers were 
elected for the ensuing year: 

Pros, Charles Gilbert; Vice Pres. 
Henry Kohler; Sec. Harvey Nitrauer : 
Treas., Luther Rearick; Executive 
Officer, Calvin Keene 

The former executive Kuhn ex- 
pressed the purpose of the club to 
give poise and training, fellowship 
and recreation that no other club on 
the campus can give. He stated that 
the national government furnishes 
the rifles, ammunition, accessories and 
medals. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



LLERS 

N- DROP TWO 



Blue And White Takes First 
Two, But Trip Proves 
Disastrous 



Annville, Jan. 5 — 

Lebanon Valley opened its basket- 
ball season on the new local high 
school floor with a 43-32 triumph 
over Juniata. Juniata opened the 
game with a fast offense and was 
leading at half time 23-16. 

Lebanon Valley found herself in 
the second half, both offensively and 
defensively holding Juniata ,to nine 
points and scoring twenty-seven 
points to win 43-32. Piela with 16 
points was high scorer; Gelbert was 
right on his heels with 14. Captain 
Fiersol's defensive play was outstand- 
ing. Michael and Weller starred for 
Juniata. The line-up: 

(Continued on Page 4) 



DR. WHEELAND CON- 
DUCTING REVIVAL 

Evangelistic Services Are Being - 
Held In College Church 
This Month 



Sunday morning, January 8, mark- 
ed the opening of a three weeks re- 
vival service at the college church 
with the Rev. Clyde Wheeland. D.D. 
of Chicago as speaker. 

Dr. Wheeland is regarded as one of 
the most outstanding men among the 
Evangelists of the Presbyterian 
Church, coming to us at the recom- 
mendation of Homer A. Rodeheaver 
as being especially adaptable to col- 
lege communities. 

Friday night Dr. Wheeland spoke 
to the College students using for hi? 
(Continued on Page 4) 



LEBANON VALLEY 
CO-EDS WIN TWO 

Local Sextette Makes Excellent 
Showing In First Two 
B. B. Starts 



Reading Jan. 6 — 

The Lebanon Valley girls opened 
their basketball season here to-night 
by completely outplaying the Schuyl- 
kill sextette 27-5. 

The Annville girls played rings a- 
round the local girls, passing better 
showing far better accuracy in their 
shots and displaying better flo <■• 
work. Lane and Meyers were the 
high scorers for Lebanon Valley. 
Gorski and March starred on the de- 
(Continued on Page 3) 



PRES. A. T. HOWARD 

VISITS CAMPUS 



President Howard of Bonebrak > 
Theological Seminary was a visitor 
at the college last week. He spole 
personally to all of the Senior Minis- 
terial students and to most of the 
others. He reports that the Seminary 
is having its best year, being very 
optimistic regarding the future of 
the school. Dr. Howard was returning 
from an International Missionary 
Conference ft Atlantic City. , 



FIRST EXERCISES HELD IN NEW 

CHAPEL WITH DR. WALLACE SPEAKER 

Students Note Improvements With Pride — Curtains of Non- 
Inflammable Velour Purchased 
For Stage 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 
ARRANGES PROGRAM 

Miss Engle Directs Girls As 
They Plan For Exceptional 
Program 



The Eurydice Choral Club, will 
Miss Engle as director is busy train- 
ing for the unusual and clever pro- 
gram which they expect to render 
later in the season Although just a 
skeleton of the program can be giver, 
at this time it promises to be one of 
the best and most entertaining pro- 
grams ever given. There will be 
folk songs of various countries. Two. 
a French Folk song and "Summer Is 
Icumen In", were written in the 
thirteenth century. In fact the latter 
is the earliest form of music written. 
The words of these pieces are rather 
dift'icut to pronounce affording some 
aamusement until they are under- 
stood. They»are also preparing a 
group of nature songs as "Afterglow" 
"The Wind ', and "The Rain". Many 
folks are acquainted with the negro 
song, "Deep River", which will be 
sung by the club. Various other 
pieces that will balance the program 
very well are: "Salutation", "Kame- 
noi Strow", "May Carol" and the 
cheerful and beautiful "Valse Ariet- 
ta". These numbers will be inter- 
spersed by solos, quartettes and 
sketch. Miss Ensle as Orpheus L 
imparting to her well-beloved "Eury- 
dice" the secrets of music which will 
melt the hearts, make them sad or 
glad. With these instructions the 
wife of Orpheus is looking forwarc 
to a successful season. 



CMP IS 

HELD IN TOWN 

High School Sponsors Three 
Days Of Swarthmore Circuit 
In New Auditorium 



For three days last week the 
Swarthmore Chautauqua, held in the 
High School Gymnasium, attracted 
large crowds of the towns-folk, ar/3 
also great numbers of the student 
body. The Association, by offering 
a student ticket for one dollar, made 
this possible. 

The opinion of those in attendenee 
is to the effect that the entire pro- 
gram was of the highest order. The 
program began on Monday and endec 1 
on Wednesday night. There were 
afternoon and evening sessions on 
each of these days. A number that 
was of special merit was the Earnest 
Gamble Co., who in their "Musical 
Portraits" gave dramatized portion? 
from the great music classics. Hon 
Mrank B. Pearson was both entertain- 
ing and instructive in his lecture 
"Whither Goest Thou?" On the last 
night The S. S. Henry & Co. gave 
an entertainment with magic and art 



After a number of unavoidable de- 
lays which occupied quite some time 
during the extensive alterations oi 
the chapel and Engle Conservatory, 
the students were again able to as- 
semble for the morning chapel exer- 
cises on Monday, January 16, and 
they listened to a very interesting 
talk by Dr. Edward Wallace, a mis- 
sionary from China and a brother oi 
our own Dr. P. A W. Wallace. 

The chapel presented a new and 
neater appearance, and though every- 
thing is not yet in place, enough can 
be seen to know that there is a vast 
improvement over the former assemb- 
ly room. The newly installed light- 
ing system furnishes indirect light, 
well dispersed over the entire room. 
The stage lights have not yet been 
adjusted, but they are ready to be 
placed in position. The extension of 
the balcony, which increases the seat- 
ing capacity, and the closed-in win- 
dows back of the stage which permit 
(Continued on Page 4) 



3RD STAR COURSE 
NUMBER IS GIVEN 

Tack Wood's Male Quartet and 
Bell Ringers Please In New 
Chapel 



On of the most popular entertain- 
ment companies of today, was heard 
in Engle Conservatory, by a large 
and appreciative audience Wednes- 
day night. The bells used by the 
company were made by the same 
bell-founders who cast the great belh> 
of the Westminster Abbey and St. 
Paul's Cathedral in London The 
in their scope ranging from such a 
powerful number as Rachmaninoff's 
"Prelude in C Sharp Minor" to 
the liveliest of popular tunes 
The Jack Wood Singers had pleas- 
ing voices and sang remarkably 
well together and individually. \ 
feature of the program was a group 
of ballads sung to the accompaniment 
of the bells with an effect of poignant 
sweetness that will long be remem- 
bered. In addition to the music or 
the bells and vocal selections, instru- 
mental ensemble numbers employing 
violin, cello, banjo, and piano were 
rendered. 



SOPHS ELECT 

NEW OFFICERS 



A meeting of the Sophomore class 
was recently called to order by Pres. 
Rudy Cunjack for the purpose f 
electing officers for the second semes- 
ter. The nominations were as follows*. 

Pies., Calvin Keene, Frederick 
Uhoads; Vice Pres., Mary McCurdy, 
Kalherine Hagner; Sec, Ruth March, 
Corrine Dynne; Financial Sec, Lucile 
Hoist, Helen Hand; Treas, Homer All- 
wein, Oscar Sneath. 

The following were elected: Pres.. 
Calvin Keene; Vice Pres, Mary Mc - 
Curdy; Sec, Ruth March; Financial 
Sec, Lucile Hoist: Treas Homer A'"' 
wein 



ft 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, J A X I AJR Y, 19, 1.92& 



laiieWkjiennt 

PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 
H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 
Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, 2b 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '3 

Athletics G. CLIFFORD SINGLED, '2i 

Clio MARY E. McCURDY, "6 

Delphian ANNA B. APGAR, '3l 

Kalo MILES S. KIEHNER, '2: 

Philo JOHN W. BEATT1E, 2t> 

General JAMES C. HAZELTON, '6 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, 'it 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '2t 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '2S 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNET'] 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year — Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 

|~~~ "IETitorlIls j 

4 ON THE WAY" 

A front page article gives an account of the first chapel ser 
vice in the remodeled chapel. A new lighting system; enlarges 
balcony; new seats; hardwood floors; complete renovation anc 
redecoration; relighted and recurtained stage — a new chapel. Ada 
to this the repairs to the entire building — at a total cost of al- 
most $25,000 — and we see one of the much-talked-of "steps for- 
ward" a reality. Verily, we are "on the Way". 



"SPIRIT OF HARMONY" 

In the past week or so, the literary societies — together with 
a few other campus organizations— have been called upon to d< 
some real cooperating, when the matters of anniversary regula- 
tions, the much-discussed curtain, and others arose. It is well 
to remember that, even though it is only sane and mature to 
stand for one'si rights if they be well founded, yet, in order to 
progress — yea, in order to livc-we must cooperate. Old stuff? 
Good — let's do something about it. Remember the old story of 
the asylum guard who answered, when asked why the inmates 
never banded together and escaped, in this way, "Insane people 
never cooperate!" A "Spirit of Harmony" isn't altogether Uto- 
pian. 



NOISE 

Most of the unnecessary noise made in the Ad Building halls 
during class hours is unintentional, perhaps; but wouldn't it be 
gratifying to all concerned if all of us would take more rare ii 
this respect? 



MUD 

In .such weather as this the campus needs special care. The 
soft turf can be ruined permanently — indeed, it has been ruined 
permanently in some cases— unless everyone prove thoughtfn 
and "patriotic". Trucks and cars heve been driving over the 
turf in full view of passing students without even a mild remon 
strance from these folks. Annville school children— we hop< 
they were children — have left marks several inches deep on the 
tennis courts. Shall we do our part to prevent any more of this 
trouble? 



MAGAZINES 



It has often been said, locally, that the road to the library 
is "paved with good intentions". There is one department there 
that could be used profitably by most of us, but which we oftei 
forget — the magazine department. In this struggle to keep u] 
with the world about us as well as with the worlds that hav< 
passed, the better magazines can help us to an amazing degree. 
Economics, Science, Politics, History, Arts, I etters, Theology 
all are focalized and epitomized in the magazines on the library's 
shelves. Of course you may not consistently find much there 
on the latest murders and scandals, hut there is a possibility of 
finding the best edited and most important new s of the day Try 
it! 



"It Is Written-" 



Deep in the heart of me, 
Nothing but you! 
See through the art of me — 
Deep in the heart of me 
Find the best part of me, 
Changless and true! 
Deep in the heart of me, 
Nothing but You!'' 

Ruth Guthrie Hardin; 



I shall never forget you, never 
Never escape your memory wover 
about the beautiful things of 

life * 

— Laurence Hope 



Td rather have the theme of you 
To thread my nights and days, 
T'd rather have the dream of yo 
With faint stars glowing, 
I'd rather have the want of you, 
The rich elusive taunt of you 
Forever and forever and forever un- 

confessed 
Than claim the alien comfort of anv 

other's breast.'' 

— Angela Mor^a- 



"A Book of Versus underneath the 
Bough 

A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread - 

and Thou 
Beside me singing in the Wildernes r 
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!" 

— Omar Khayyam 



'Your soul I tried to fathom 
But words I only found 
And you became as dead to me 
As dead folks underground. 
Your desire I tried to kindle, 
But you were cold and clear 
And I have found another heart 
I think 'twill warm — my dear. 
In days when I am loving 
This other maid so sere 
I think that I can then forget 
How cold you are — my dear!'' 

— Anonymous 



"Music I heard with you was more 

than music, 
And bread I broke with you waf 

more than bread; 
Now that I am without you, all is 

desolate; 

All that was once so beautiful is 
dead." 

— Conrad Aikei 



"There never was a mood of mine. 
Gay or heart-broken, luminus or 
dull, 

But you could ease me of its fever 
And give it back to me more beauti- 
ful." 

li .41 

"I made you many and many a song, 
Yet never one told all you are — 
It was as though a net of words 
Were flung to catch a star; 
It was though I curved my hand 
And dipped sea-water eagerly, 
Only to find it lost the blue 
Dark splendor of the sea. 

— Sara TeasdaV 

"The hours I spent with thee, dear 
heart, 

Are as a string of pearls to m; 
I count them over, every one apart 
My rosary." 

—Robert Cameron Roger 1 



"Somewhile before the dawn I rose 
and stept 

Softly along the dim way to your 
room, 

And found you sleeping in the quie 
gloom, 

And holiness about you as you slept 
I knelt there; till your waking fin 

gers crept 
About my head, and held it. T har 1 

rest 

Unhoped this side of Heaven, be 

neath your breast. 
I knelt a long time, still; nor eve - 

wept." 

— Rupert Brook 3 





'0 wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!' 



—BURmS 



The Campus Worm has been requested to announce that 
Kelly Bowman, Ness, John Walters, and several other ex-campus 
mechanics have been hired at i2j cents an hour with 2% bonus 
for overtime, to finish the chapel interior. 



As soon as mid-year exams are over the curtain finance prob- 
lem will be disposed of by flunked Freshmen, 



Question: Who were Veronica and Homer? 
Answer: You'd be surprised. 



Skipper Barnhart, guardian of the chapel platform, has given 
orders that all chapel speakers carefully guard all their words 
so that the platform won't be scratched. 



The popularit3 r contest in North Hall between dead rats and 
yeast cakes is about ended, yeast cakes are leading by a high 
majority. 

&>._< ' 1 1 



Compulsory chapel once more is a hard, cold fact. 



They say that, with Louise nearly a hundred miles away, 
Duke Wheeler is looking around so much that he strained his 
eyes and must wear glasses. 



As usual, the campus is out of date again,. The French 
berets, popular "among men who know what to wear" six 
months' ago are just being discovered here Those berets do 
bring out the features of the wearer. 



Some one should have told the chapel speaker on M-~ 
that to speak in chapel without saying "I know you're anxie 
to get back to class," isn't done at this college. 



Lebanon Valley College Girls' Basketball Schedule, Season 1928 

Friday, January 6 Schuylkill __I Reading 

Saturday, January 14 Gettysburg Annville^ 

Friday, January 20 Gettysburg Gettysburg 

Saturday, January 21 W. Maryland Westminster 

Saturday, F e bruary \. Dickinson Carlisle 

Friday, February 10 Albright Lebanon 

Saturday, February 18 Schuylkill Annvill e 

Saturday, February 25 Juniata Huntingdon 

Friday, March 2 A 1 bright Lebanon 

fcatur ay, March 10 W. Maryland Annville' 

Saturday, March 17 Juniata Annville 



ON BORN TO DR. 

AND MRS. WAGNEf 



Born! Another mathematician for 
our campus. This new comer arrived 
at Baltimore, December 29th, 1927 
and is none other than George Pli t 
Wagner, son of Dr. and Mrs. Paul S 
Wagner. He is a bouncing fellow 
weighing 7% lbs,., and is 21 inches 
tall. He surely is a chip off the ola 
block. 

Prof, is desirious of having his son 
"getting out there to tight for Leb- 
inon Valley" on the gridiron as well 
as a wrestler of the problems of 
Euclid and Pythogoras. Congratula- 
tions! Prof 



HEAR YE, ALL! 
Last call for snaps for 1929 
Quittie. Hand them to Bea* 
tie NOT LATER THAN 
SATURDAY, JAN. 21. 



. . v : : .. ." 

The faculty and Students 
extend their heartfelt sym- 
pathy to Andrew Laurie in 
his bereavement. \ 



TT 

all i 
stud 
ents 
Illim 
thin 
Univ 
vvith 
TJniv 

Ri 

sirat 
Intei 
tion 
to gi 
these 
parti 

At 
Nort 

S. E 
one-1 
must 
time; 

Dc 
mor< 
that 
leges 
twen 
year 
tions 
on t 
tion 

Te 
exan 
depa 
quat 

j. n 
ouslj 
brigl 
plac< 
ises 
ditio 
mere 

All 
gethi 
Febr 

Th 

new 
and 
Apai 
roon 
the f 



It! 

vice) 
that 
now 
pres< 
work 
shou 
schei 
spak 
er f f 
eral 
coli e 
Mr 
posei 
of 

Nath 
be^e 
Of 
the ( 

Hrp 

f o m 
the 
scrip 
side.' 
An 

trie, 
Oxfo 
to a ( 
ou r j 

An 
"R 
loth 
that 
M < 
ratio 



at 



alt f 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY, m, 1028. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



The University of California lead 
a ll institutions with 17,311 full time 
students. Columbia has ,13,275 stud- 
en ts enrolled and the University of 
Illinois with 12,033 students slandt 
third in full time enrollment Th' 
University of Minnesota is fourtr 
w ith 11,307 students and New Yorl 
University fifth with 10,218 students 



Rutgers — In order to exclude unde- 
sirable guests from house parties the 
Interfraternity council passed a mo- 
tion which requires each fraternity 
to give its guests identification cards, 
these cards to serve as admission at 
parties of other houses. 



Aberdeen, S. D. — Freshmen a1 
Northern Normal School, Aberdeen. 
S. D., must wear a nursing bottle 
one-fourth full of milk. The bottle 
must be worn in plain sight at all 
times. » 



Dean Raymond Walters, of Swarth- 
niore College, shows by tabulations 
that the enrollment in American co 1 - 
leges and universities has increased 
twenty-five per cent in the last five 
years. The figure 1 : for the tabula- 
tions were taken from 211 institutions 
on the approved list of the associa- 
tion of American Universities. 



Temple University has abolished al 1 
examinations because the psychlogy 
department there says they are anti- 
quated and inaccurate. 



The Albright "Bulletin" stren- 
ously denies that the threatened Al- 
bright-Schuylkill merger will take 
place in the near future, and prom- 
ises that the Albright name and tra- 
ditions will be transferred when the 
merger finally does take place. 

Albright's annual mid-year Get-To- 
gether for Alumni will be held on 
February 3rd and 4th this year. 



The structural work on Juniata's 
new collesre building is completed, 
and finishing touches are being made. 
Apartment, suites, and a recreation 
room are included in the make-up of 
the all. 



Mr. Mencken Convinced 

Ithaca, N. Y. (by New Student Ser- 
vice) --"I am thoroughly convinced 
that too many young Americans are 
now going to college and that their 
presence is greatly impeding the 
work of the colleges. Certainly it 
should be possible to devise some 
scheme to weed out the unfit." Thus 
spake Henry L. Mencken to a report- 
er for the Cornell Sun, in one of sev- 
er al interviews recently granted to 
college papers. 

Mr. Mencken, we are told, "is op- 
Posed to the college for the purpose 
°f intellectual education With 
an he holds that its greatest 
benefits are social." 

Of compulsory military training 
the editor of the Mercury said: 

"The military training idea seems 
f ° me absurd. I see no reason why 
the college student should be con- 
Scr ipted and not the young man out- 
side." 

And of the lecture system: 

'The American system, it seems to 
ltle . is better tor Americans than the 
Oxford system. It is obviously more 
ln accord with the habit of mind of 
° Ur people." 

And of fraternities: 
Regarding fraternities, I know 
n °thintv. It is commonly alleged 
^ a t they foster snobbery. But I see 
n ° obiectin to snobbery per se; all 
ra1 ional men are snobs in some woy 
° r another. That the fraternities ex- 
alt fifth-raters and overlook men of 
J*rtt may be true, but the accusation 
J'Rht be leveled against any other I 

Um an institution." ; 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



PHILO ELECTS 

AND HOLD TWC 

Philo held its mid-year election at 
a special business session of the so- 
ciety, and the following were selected 
fr the ensuing term:— President 
Harvey L. Nitrauer; Vice-President 
Luther M. Rearick; Recording Sec- 
retary, William J. Meyers; Corres- 
ponding Secretary, Francis B. Barr; 
Pianist, Jacob M. Horst; Chairman of 
the Executive Committee, Harold C 
Rider; Critic, Charles M. Gelbert; 
Chaplain, Calvin Keene; Janitors 
Chester Johnson, Harold Watkins, 
and Herbert Welker 

An extemporaneous program was 
given On Friday evening, January P 
as follows: 

Christmas Holiday", John Snyder; 
"Corrections", Chester Johnson; "Vo- 
cal Solo", John Beattie; "Resolutions". 
Samuel Meyer. 

On Friday evening, January 13, 
President-elect Nitrauer was formadv 
inducted into office, and after the 
other officers had also been installed 
a literary program was given which 
opened with the "Living Thoughts" 
by Editor John Snyder; Byron Sheetz 
presented the "Direct Primary Sys- 
tem", and Dr. A. Bender traveled 
From H to O" in an extraordinarily 
interesting fashion. Russell Oyer and 
John Beattie furnished a diversio i 
with their vocal duet, and Dr. P. A 
W. Wallace closed the evening's en- 
tertainment with his "Ginger Ale- 
Canada Dry?". 



Mr. Mencken urges all who feel 
the urge to write, first to obtain 
steady employment. Until recently 
he suggested bootlegging, but the 
strength of competition has led to 
advocacy of taxi driving and sim- 
ilar occupations 



WELL, WELL! 

Santa Arrives Early at 

South Barclay Phone 

Christmas is not scheduled to arrive 
until Sunday, but for those under- 
graduates who desired to make long 
distance telephone calls, the spirit of 
good Saint Nicholas hovered above 
the South Barclay phone several days- 
last week. According to reports, the 
full amount of the charge for each 
call was returned from the pay tele- 
phones in this dormitory immediately 
after the call was completed. 

Pittsburgh, Boston, Norfolk, Cleve- 
land and Springfield, Mass., are a few 
of the cities to which undergraduate 
calls are reported to have been made 
in one evening. The waiting line of- 
ten contained eight men at one time, 
it was said. 

One student is alleged to have made 
a $35 call to Oakland, Cal., one night, 
sent a radiogram to a Pacific steamer 
the next, and a cablegram to Hawaii 
the third. The effort expanded in 
dropping quarter dollars through the 
slots in the telephone was the only 
cost of all messages sent while the 
Christmas spirit lasted. 

— From "Haverford News" 



Let's Arbitrate 

Ithaca, N. Y. (by New Student Ser- 
vice)— Regular faculty-student con- 
ferences for discussion of faculty 
legislation pertaining to students is 
suggested by the Cornell Sun to "pro- 
mote greater understanding and in- 
sure complete cooperation in ques- 
'ions directly concerning the under 
graduate body." The Sun believes a 
representative group of students 
meeting with the faculty would do 
much to remove mutual irritation 
The proposal is not new. Elsewhere 
it has been presented in student at- 
*pmpts to gain access to faculty meet- 
ings. 



CLIOS TO CIVE 

FIFTY-SEVENTH 

(Continued from page 1.) 



using North Hall for the receptio l 
room. It will prove interesting and 
different and can only be anticipated, 
for no one knows just how North Hal 1 
will satisfy in its new task. 

The whole society cordially invites 
everyone to attend both the program 
and the reception, and the partici- 
pants in the program promise to offer 
a worthy entertainment 



LEBANON VALLEY 

CO-EDS WIN TWO 

(Continued From Page i) 

fense. 

j g i T 

E. LeVan f ___ 1 7 

A. LeVan f 1 1 

Miller f 1 f 

Strauss f 1 1 

A. Heere jc : 

C. Miller sc 

Eisenbise sc 

Mosser g 

Freidinger g 

Eschelman g 

Total 1 3 5 

g f P 

Meyer f 4 1 9 

Lane f 3 6 12 

Cochran f 1 4 6 

M. Miller jc 

J. Miller sc 

March g -0 iV 

Gorski g 

Showers sc 

Freeman sc n 

Total 8 11 27- 

Referee — Mrs Eva Mosser. 



Annville, Jan. 14 — 

Lebanon Valley girls won their sec- 
ond game of the season, defeating 
the strong Gettysburg sextette 45-31. 
It was a fine scoring game with Leb- 
anon Valley managing to stay on too 
The work of Lane and Meyers at for- 
ward was of outstanding quality in 
getting away from the Gettysburg 
guards. Cochran and Gorski played 
good games at guard. Irene Miller' - 
floor work at side-center was of great 
value in getting the ball to her for- 
wards. Lineuo: 

GETTYSBURG 

g t p 

Richards f 5 10 

Smith f 

Fischer f , 4 9 17 

Horn c ' 

Greenaway jC-i 2 4 

Herme g 

Menges g 

Bowers g-sc 

Total 11 9 « 

LEBANON VALLEY 

g f P 

Meyers f 10 20 

Lane f ? 11 25 

Horst f 

J. Miller c 

Freeman sc-c u P 

Showers sc 

Cochran g 

Gorski g 

March g " 



Total 



.17 11 45 



RIFLE CLUB 

REORGANIZES 

(Continued From Page '.1 

The club is trying to get financial 
support from the college authorities, 
Tf it is obtained all male students will 
h e members of the club and .may tr>' 
out for the team. Forty members 
have enrolled and more are expected 



DELPHI A NS INSTALL 

NEW TERM OFFICEF 



On Thursday, January 5, office- 
'or the second term, were installc 
in the Delphian Literary Society a 
follows: President, Sara Lou Rose 
Vice President, Edna Lang; Record 
ing Secretary, Mae Hamer; Corres- 
ponding Secretary, Milded Lane 
Critic, Ruth Strubhar; Pianist, Olivr 
Weigel; Chaplain, Anna Apgar; War- 
den, Madeline Sheddy. 

With these officers installed, ~" 
phian held its first literary session 
for 1928, on Friday evening, Januar- 
13. The program was in charge of 
the sophomores, who created a true 
French atmosphere, in rendering the 
following: Recent French History. 
Helen Hand; piano solo, Eleanor Kis- 
singer; French music and its com- 
posers, Olive Weigel; French songs, 
in charge of Ruth Cooper; peasant 
dance, in charge of Kathryn Hagner: 
French Folk lore and humor. Blanche 
Cochran; French skit, in charge of 
Marion Heaps. 

The Delphians will return fro" 
their trip abroad after the last stop- 
over, which will be in charge of the 
Senior girls on Friday evening. 



TWO PROGRAMS 

GIVEN AT KALO 



The regular literary session of Kalo 
was held Friday night, Dec. 13th at 
6:30 in Kalo HaU. The program 
though short was interesting, peppy 
and amusing. 

Following is the order of events: 
Surveying the Realms of Chemistry, 
Hovis : Trumpet Solo Russell ac- 
companied by M. Kiehner); Broad 
Economic Freedom, G. Snyder, Musi- 
cal Squad, Becker, Morgan, Trezise. 
Edmunds, Russell; Editor Examiner, 

The program for the evening of 
Friday Jan. 6th was: 

'The S-4 Disaster, Aungst; Jazzme- 
tics, Kunkel; The Spice of Life, Rau- 
dabush; World Events, Allwein; Edi' 
tor Examiner 

PHYS. EFl. CLASSES 

ARE INAUGURATED 



The "much loved" gym classes. .ha v.? 
again been inaugurated in an effort 
to develop some of the neglected phy- 
siques of our co-eds and cake eaters. 

Prof Stokes i° the director, of th» 
co-eds. He handles the fair sex in a 
very capable manner and seems to be 
a master in this line. Cross-country 
hikes are one of the features of the 
co-eds program. 

The fellows treat each other pretty 
roughly, many complaining of sore 
shoulders, arms, legs and even necks. 
However they'll soon be accustomed 
to this' form of development, and th * 
everything will move along smoothH. 
Don't be surprised if you see some of 
the boys with the physique of v 
Greek athlete. 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville _ _ N _ '_ _ Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon,' Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

KODAKS & SUPPLIES, FILMS. 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING - 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

'Printing- — Publishing; 
Advertising; ' '■ " 
Annville Pcnna. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 



THE HUB 



713 Cumberland Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



* moicc 

36 North Eighth Street, 



Photographs of Quality 

BLAZIER & MILLER 

lebanon.pa; 



page four 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY, 19, 1928. 



Y.W.-Y.M.C.A. Notes 



Two Lebanon Valley students at- 
tended the Tenth Quadriennial Con- 
vention of the Student Volunteer 
Movement for Foreign Missions in the 
Masonic Temple at Detroit, from 
December 28 to January 1. They were 
Miss Mae Hamer and Miss Ruth 
Cooper. 

The general topics discussed were 
denominationalism and the need of 
Christ in our Western civilization as 
well as in Oriental civilizations. 

Some of the prominent speakers 
were: Sherwood Eddy; Mardecca 
Johnson; John R. Mott, President of 
the World's Alliance of Young Men's 
Christian Association; Dr. Henry 
Hodgkin; and Dr. Robert E. Spear. 
The outstanding address was given 
by Reinhold Niebheur, in which h* 
attacked the narrow-minded denomi- 
nationalism of this country. 

Over thirty-five hundred delegate.- 
from the United States Canada, and 
from nearly every foreign country in 
the World attended. 



BASKETBALLERS 

WIN — DROP TWO 

(Continued from Page 1) 



LEBANON VALLEY 

g 1 P 

Gelbert f 7 14 

Piela f 6 4 16 

Shroyer f 10 2 

Miller c 2 2 

Wheeler c 1 2 

Albright g 1 2 A 

Persol g Oil 

Bell g 10 2 

Wood g G 



Total 



.17 9 43 



Dr. Bennett was the speaker at the 
Y. M. meeting on Sunday night. He 
gave an interesting talk on "The Re- 
ligion of a College Man." It is dur- 
ing our. college career that the fait! 
of some of us in the Bible is tested 
Some of the miracles in the Bibh 
defy the laws of nature known to us. 
It is because of this fact that some 
of us lose faith. But as we advance 
in learning this faith will be renewec 
and it will be greater than it was ir 
the beginning. These were the out 
standing facts pointed out by Dr 
Bennett in his talk 



r 



Alumni Notes 



Stricken with a heart attack, Win- 
ton J. Baltzell, a native of Shire- 
manstown, author of a number of 
histories and textbooks on music, 
dropped dead while talking to a 
friend in New York City. 

Baltzell was born in Shiremanstown 
in 1864. He received his A. B. degree 
in 1884, from Lebanon Valley College. 
He received his musical education in 
the University of Pennsylvania, the 
New England Conservatory of Music, 
and from private teachers in London 
England. 

Baltzel was editor of magazines de 
voted to music, and author of a dic- 
tionary of musicians and music ap- 
preciation. He was Secretary of the 
National Academy of Music in New 
York for several years. 



A recent issue of the "Country 
Gentleman" contains an interesting 
account of George Hoffer, of Hum- 
melstown, a professor of chemistry at 
Purdue, who has solved the question 
of how to make good corn grow in 
poor land, in Iowa and elsewhere. 

Mr, Hoffer, a botanist, is a graduate 
of Lebanon Valley College, 1909. For 
a time he made various experiment? 
to find out all possible about crops 
and soil. These years of experimen- 
tation have made out of Hoffer, one 
of the country's best known expert? 
on run-down fields, and today he and 
his associates are making new land 
out of old lands that used to raise 
bumper crops. 

Mr. Hoffer specialized in Chemistry 
while he was here at Lebanon Valley, 
so that, he has been able to use "the 
chemistry of it" in his work in Bot- 
WTjr. 



JUNIATA 

g f P 

Weller f -_ 3 2 8 

Berry f 1 1 

Andrews f 3 3 

Holsinger c _.. 4 10 

Michaels g 4 8 

Douglas g __. 11 

Berry g 2? 



Field goals- -Von Neida, 4; Loun- 
gren, 4; Poepke, 3; Hamas, 2; Brown- 
stein, 2 ; Reilly, 2; Reinhold, Delp. 
Gelbert,' 4; Miller, 3; Piela, 2; Bru- 
baker. Foul goals — Reilly, 2; Hamas 
Piela, Pierson. Substitutions- Shroy - 
er for Gelbert, Bell for Albright 
Wheeler for Pierson, Brubaker for 
Piela, Wood for Hamas, Brwnstein 
for Reilly, Baron for Loungren, Delp 
for Von Neida, Reinhold for Stahley. 
Referee — Turik. 
Huntington, Jan. 11 — 



PROFS ARE BUSY 

OVER VACATION 

(Continued From Page ! ) 



Total 

Referee — Boyer. 



•1 10 32 



Reading, Jan. 6 — 

In an exceedingly rough game Leb- 
anon Valley's basketball team won 
its second victory of the season droo- 
ping Schuylkill 32-11. 

Unable to keep pace with the fast 
passing Annville Collegians,Schuylkill 
scored only three baskets in the en- 
tire game and was soon left behind. 
The foul shooting of both teams was 
decidedly poor, Schuylkill only mak- 
ing 5 tries good in 22, and Lebanon 
Valley 8 out of 18 attempts. Miller 
starred on the offensive for Lebanon 
Valley. Piersol's work on the de- 
fensive was a big factor in holding 
Schuylkill to three field goals. 

The line-up: — 

SCHUYLKILL 

g f P 

Yetzer f 2 1 5 

Stauffer f-c 1 2 4 

Ford f 0" 

Boyle c 2 2 

Norris f ___ 

Oyster g > 

Price c 

Purnell g C 

Barkman g f 

Zartman g 



Juniata defeated Lebanon Valley 
here to-night 39-22. Juniata's vaunted 
attack that failed to function at Ann- 
ville last week was much in evidence 
to-night. Ihe work of Eisenhail 
and Holsinger done much to dowi 
the Lebanon Valley five. PieVr- 
playing was the outstanding feature 
of the Blue and White offensive. 

JUNIATA 



Total 



.5 5 1! 



LEBANON VALLEY 

i f P 

Gelbert f-g 4 1 9 

Piela f 3 3 9 

Miller c 4 3 11 

Schroyer f _ 10 2 

Wheeler c U 1 1 

Bell g 

Piersol g v 

Wood g 

Total 12 8 32 

Fouls tried- -Schuylkill, 22; Leb 
anon Valley, 18. Referee Abtains. 
f 



State College, Pa., Jan. 12:— 

Lebanon Valley expene^ced <; 
second defeat of the season • 
to Penn State 41-22. The State five 
held a 26-7 lead at the end of the 
first half. In the second half the 
teams played on even terms. 

Lebanon Valley only threatened 
once during the game, that was early 
in the second half when a spurt put 
them within <i few points of State 
for a few minutes. Gelbert led the 
scoring for Leoanon Valley with 8 
points. Von Neida and Lungren 
featured for State with 8 points each. 

The lineup: 

Lebanon Valley Penn State 

Piela forward Poepke 

Gelbert » forward Hamas- 
Miller center Reilly 

Albright guard Von Neid;- 

Pi*rson guard Lungren.. 





g 


f 


F 


Weller f 


4 


1 


y 


Stule f 










Eisenhart f 


5 


3 


13 









o 


Hoilsinger c 


. 








J. Berry c _ . 


_ o 










_ 





i 




. 1 





2 


Michaels g 











Total . 


.17 




3!i 



LEBANON VALLEY 

g f 

Gelbert f 113 

Piela f 4 6 14 

Shroyer f 

Brubaker f 

Miller c 1 2 

Wheeler c-g 

Albright g 1 1 S 

Bell g 

Piersol g 

Wood 

Total 7 8 22 



Prof. Reynolds attended all sessions 
of the State Teacher's Meeting which 
was held in Lancaster, Dec. 28 and 
29. Two of the outstanding speakers 
were State Superintendent of Educa- 
tion, Dr. Keith and Mr. Henry Suz- 
zalo of the Carnegie Foundation, 
New York Prof. Reynolds reports 
that a very noticeable feature of the 
meeting was the incresaed attendance 
of College teachers. Prof Grimm was 
also in attendance for one day. 

Prof. Butterwick was the principal 
speaker at the United Philadelphia 
Ministerial Assciationa The La Vie 
takes the privilege of quoting from 
a clipping in regard to this meeting. 
"The able address was on 'The Mes- 
sage for the Age'. Dr. Butterwick 
was of the opinion that this message 
for the age is more religion and less 
theology. While a number differed 
with the speaker as to the forepart 
of his address, they nevertheless were 
pleased to see him advocating a sound 
evangelical position ere he closed, es- 
pecially as he urged the preaching of 
the Living Christ who touches and 
transforms life." 



FIRST EXERCISES 

IN NEW CHAPEL 

(Continued From Page i) 



a much better view of the stage, are 
two of the most prominent changes. 

Many other improvements, some of 
which are not yet completed, assure 
the college an up-to-date conserva- 
tory and chapel. A set of new cur- 
tains has been ordered for the stage 
setting. The one which has been se 
lected for the room is made of non- 
inflammable velour and colored a 
rich maroon, hi the toacx and on 
the wings will be another curtain of 
the same material, but of a dark blue 
color. 

When finally completed, the chape' 
will be opened with appropriate ex- 
ercises. Undoubtedly, the conserva- 
tory will be the outstanding building 
on the campus in its new dress 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



DR. WHEFXAND CON- 
DUCTING REVIVAL 

(Continued From Page 1) 



subject "The Halls of Fame. - ' He 
spoke of the training which one re 
ceives from his father and mother as 
being the most valuable in solving 
the ploblems of life. All of his ser- 
mons are packed full of mcanicg and 
inspiration. The organizations of the 
Campus should not schedule any 
meetings which will conflict with the 
regular evangelistic services, because 
the college pastor is offering us a 
wonderful opportunity to hear an 
evangelist who knows the student 
mind. 



D. L Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 



Dealers in 

LumLir and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



'.■!-*— «.n 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 



LEBANON, 



PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 
Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

tt\tta\t rmnr ™ ™ VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 

UNION EMBLEM CO PALMYRA, PA. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS— TRY 

THE PENNWAY 



OPPOSITE P. O. 



A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 

HARRY W. LIGHT 

43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



vo 



Thi 



in f 
pla; 
Jun 
prei 
pla; 
wri 
dati 
pre; 
som 
T 

of 

ano 

con 

gin 

mes 

wor 

but : 

reai 

of 1 

eve 



52 



To 



P 

52,] 
sch 
ten 
a s 
of 
re a 
52 v 
ag£ 
767 
I 

tea< 
sta 
rite 
hig 
Th, 
ers 
sta 
ave 
Cal 
Dis 
$15 
Rai 
Yo 
W 3 
ter 
Alt 
anc 



ANNVILLE. PA-. 



BEAT ALBRIGHT 
FEB. 10 



laty'tt dlkgiennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SUPPORT STAR COURSE 
FEB. 13 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1928 



NUMBER 8 



JRS. CHOOSE "YOU 
NEVER CAN TELL" 



Third Year Students Decide On 
Shaw's Play For March 
Presentation 



"You Never Can Tell", a comedy 
in four acts, by Bernard Shaw, is the 
play that has been selected by the 
Junior Class for the annual third year 
presentation. It is one of the best 
plays written by Mr. Shaw, who is a 
writer of great repute. No definite 
date has as yet been arranged for its 
presentation, but it will be given 
some time in March. 

The cast, it is admitted, will be one 
of the best ever assembled at Leb- 
anon Valley. Dr. Wallace, who has 
consented to coach the play, will be- 
gin work on it immediately after se- 
mester examinations. It will take hard 
work and much practice to perfect it ; 
but,, with this cast, there is every 
reason to believe that this will be one 
of the greatest student performances 
ever enacted at Lebnon Valley. 



52,168 TEACH- 
ERS IN STATE 

Total Value Of ' The School 
Property Estimated At 
$384,188,245 



Pennsylvania public schools employ 
52,168 teachers and during the last 
school year, the average daily at- 
tendance was 1,539,454 a ccording to 
a survey conducted by the division 
of statistics of the United States Bu- 
reau of Education. During the year 
52,168 teachers held sessions for an 
aggregate of 277,689,549 days in 13 
767 school houses. 

Pennsylvania does not pay her 
teachers as well as a number of 
states. Eleven states and three ter- 
ritories or possessions maintain a 
higher compensation for instructors. 
The average annual salary for teach- 
ers in Pennsylvania is $1439. The 
states paying more and the annual 
average salaries are: Arizona $1523; 
California, $1854; Connecticut, $1606; 
District of Columbia, $2012; Illinois. 
$] 530; Massachusetts, $1680; Michi- 
gan, $1441; Nevada, $1531; New 
Y °rk, $1986; Rhode Island, $1472- 
Washington, $1475; and the following 
territories and insular possessions: 
Alaska, $1769; Canal Zone, $148°- 
a »d Hawaii, $1475. 



"Mr. and Mrs. William Simpson, 
Q f Walnut street, Lebanon, have 
announced the engagement of 
their daughter, Marian, to Elmer 
Reiser of Tower City, Lebanon 
Galley College senior. 

The bride-to-be is a graduate of 
H. S. '23 and is a graduate nurse 
° f the Woman's Medical College 
hospital, Philadelphia. No date 
ha s been set for the wedding." 

The above, quoted from a Leba- 
paper gives "the dope". 
2?od luck, Red! 



WHEELAND CONDUCTS 
CHAPEL SERVICES 

Chicago Evangelist Apnears Re- 
fore Students With Inspir- 
ing Talks 

Chapel services last week were 
conducted by Rev. Clyde R. Whee- 
land D.D., of Chicago, Illinois. It 
was decided by a vote of the students 
to have Rev. Wheeland conduct the 
chapel services. Dr. Whee)and ; who 
was holding evangelistic services in 
the college church is a Presbyterian 
Minister in Evanston, 111. He has a 
regular charge there but is sent out 
certain months of the year by the 
Presbyterian Board as an Evangelist. 
He was diretor of the young people's 
work for Billy Sunday during his 
Evangelistic campaign in 1918. Dur- 
ing his stay here he conducted Bible 
Study classes every afternoon on the 
Book of Revelation. These lectures 
were attended by a number of he 
students. Every Friday evening a 
sermon was preached especially for 
the students. 

The subject of the chapel talks 
were "What is Conversion"; "Salva- 
tion"; "Completing our lives" or "It 
is finished"; and "Attaining our Ideals 
in Life". Dr. Wheeland's talks con- 
tain a great deal of inspiration. Dr 
(Continued on Page i) 



L. V. BREAKS STREAK 
AFTER FOUR LOSSES 

Blue And White Humbles S. T T 
After Mt. St. Mary's And 
W. Md. Defeats 



Emmitsburg, Md., Jan. 18: — 

Mt. St. Mary's proved too strong 
for Lebanon Valley here to-night and 
had little trouble whipping them 46- 
28. The first half was closely con- 
tested and the Emmitsburg Collegian? 
left the floor with only a three point 
lead. In the second half the Mt 
St. Mary's team forged steadily a- 
head due to the deadly shooting of 
McGarrigan and Hemler. Piela and 
Gelbert were high scorers for Leb- 
anon Valley. 

This marked the third sraight de- 
feat for Mylin's proteges, the West- 
ern Maryland loss on the following 
night making the fourth. The co-ed 
team later avenged this second one 
however, with a 17-15 win. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



EXAMS ARE AGAIN 

HELD IN GYMNASIUM 



Examinations, which were schedul- 
ed to be held in the remodeled chapel 
are again being held in the gym, due 
to the repairing of the organ. The 
chapel is better suited for this pur- 
pose for a number of reasons. The 
ventilation in the "gym" is poor, for 
when the windows are opened abo v e 
there was often a draft. The ligbl 
will also be better, especially since 
the windows have been closed at the 
back of the stage. Seats especially 
suited for writing have been put in, 
every other seat containing an arm 
for writing which can be raised or 
lowered at will. No more blaming 
poor marks on upleasant surround- 
ings! 



CL'OS CELEBRATE 
57TH. ANNIVERSARY 

Two Short Plays Feature Pro- 
gram Of Excellence In 
New Chapel 

Clio reached another milestone in 
its long, long road on Saturday night, 
January 21, when it celebrated its 
fifty-seventh anniversary. The pro- 
gram was doubly appreciated, inas- 
much as it was the first one presented 
in the remodeled chapel. 

The large audience commented 
favorably and enthusiastically on the 
new curtain nd lighting effects. With 
this environment, the exceptional pro- 
gram of this yeaer appeared at its 
best. 

The first number was a piano solo 
by Grace Daniel, whose rendition of 
MacDowell's "Sonata Eroica", was 
extraordinary. The fact that one of 
the society's oldest alumnae, Miss 
Emma Landis, '79, gave the invoca- 
tion, insured Clio that her old mem- 
bers have not forgotten her. The 
audience was then favorably impress- 
ed by the charming vocal selection, 
(Continued on Page 3) 



LEBANON VALLEY 
C0« WIN TWO 

Go-ed Sextette S*re+or»es Wind- 
ing Streak To Four 
Victories 



The Blue and White sextette, by 
means of two more victories on last 
week's trip ; set its winning streak at 
four. The record now stands at four 
wins, with no defeats. 

The Gettysburg score was 45-32. 
This makes two wins over the bat^e- 
field sextette, the first game score be- 
ing 45-31. Meyer was again high 
scorer while Greenaway featured for 
Gettysburg. 

The girls avenged the boys' de- 
feat at hands of Western Maryland 
by victory of 17-15. This was a 
closely contested game, with L. V. 
usuallykeeping slightly in the lead. — 
(Continued on Page 3) 



FROSH " TAKES UP 

HIS BED AND WALKS" 

Much to the surprise of some of 
our most illustrious agitators and 
Sophomores, a freshman whose name 
we cannot withhold has been found 
to be paying court to one of the 
town belles. And a few evenings ago 
as the freshman backed out of the 
doorway when he had broken away 
after the tewenty-ninth good-night 
kiss he tumbled into his own bed 
which was kindly provided for him 
on the front porch of her house. 

The La Vie reporter, who has never 
had an experience like this, is unable 
to tell it with all the proper atmos- 
phere, so this paper recommends that 
its readers get in touch with Bob 
Roudabush for the interesting details 
and first-hand information. He is thi 
only person we know of who would 
be capable of describing one's feel- 
ings in such a situation. We hear 
that Mr. Roudabush is making it the 
subject of his next English theme, 
and is calling it "From Ridiculous to 
the Sublime," or, being interpreted, 
There's No Place Like My Trundle 
Bed." 



GLEE CLUB PRO- 
GRAM ARRANGED 

1928 Club Prepares Excellent 
Program — First Concert 
On February 16 

Preparing to start on its 1928 con- 
cert tour shortly after the semester 
exams are over, the Lebanon Valley 
College Glee Club has arranged one 
of its best and most entertaining pro- 
grams for presentation during this 
season. The club will appear under 
the personal direction of Prof. Alex- 
ander Crawford, who has developed 
an outstanding singing organization. 

The arrangement of the tours has 
not yet been competely made, but ac- 
cording to present plans the opening 
concert will be given in Lebanon on 
February 16. Others include Lykens 
on February 18; Shamokin on Feb- 
ruary 20; Tower City on February 21; 
Pine Grove on February 22; Valley 
View on February 23; Palmyra on 
March 2;Greencastle on March 16; 
Shippensburg on March 17; Baltimore 
on March 19; and Washington on 
March 20. Definite dates for Reading 
Frederick, Harrisburg, Middletown, 
Dallastown, Red Lion, Shiremans- 
town, Carlisle or Mechanicsburg have 
not yet been selected. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



CLASS ELECTIONS 
ARE COMPLETED 

Knisely, Derickson, and Russell 
Elected — Sophs Officers 
Previously Announced 



With the absolute assurance that 
everyone will return to L. V. for the 
second semester, the following class 
elections took place: 

Senior Class: President, Milfoi l 
Knisely; Vice President Bernice 
Hoover; Secretary Anna Mark; Fi- 
nancial Secretary, J. Horst; and 
Treasurer, Millard Miller. 

Junior Class: President, Lawrence 
Derrickson; Vice President, Edna 
Gorski; Secretary, Florence Miller; 
Financial Secretary, Mae Hamer: 
Treasurer, Fritz Miller. 

Freshman Class: President, Ken- 
neth Russell; Vice President Eliza- 
beth Engle; Secretary, Madeline 
Sheddy; Financial Secretary, Kay 
Bowers; Treasurer, Joe Hutchinson. 



FOUR DEBATING 

TEAMS AT WORK 

Two Girls' And Two Men's 
Teams Are Busy As Manag- 
ers Arrange Schedule 



This year Lebanon Valley College 
has four debating teams, and active 
work has been commenced toward a 
good season. As soon as exams are 
over, they will be getting into the 
regular swing of constructive work 

There is a team of three (and one 
alternate) on each side of the ques- 
tion for the girls, and the same holds 
true for the boys. On the negative 
girls' team are the Misses Shaeffer, 
Heister, Ax, and Liller while the af- 
firmative girls' team consists of the 
Misses Brinser, Hess, Miller, and 
Muth. The girls will have their first 
debate with Elizabethtown College on 
Feb. 22nd. Other Colleges on their 
schedule are Albright, Juniata, Buck- 
nell, and Schuylkill. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



PREACHERS SING 

AT HARRISBURG 

The newly organized "Preacher's 
Sons' Quartette", composed of Russell 
Oyer, Edgar Shroyer, Harold Rider, 
and Lanston Mentzer, made its in- 
ital appearance within the last week 
at the banquet of the Young Men's 
Class of the Derry Street Unite 1 
Brethren church of Harrisburg, and 
was well received by a large group 
of banqueteers, including William 
Lehman, '30 and William Spangler, 
'31 both members of the class. The 
boys were treated to an excellent tur- 
key dinner, after which they broke 
the ice for the program with several 
popular and classical numbers. The 
program of talks and instrumental 
numbers was followed by several 
more well appreciated selections by 
the collegiate four, ending a most en- 
joyable evening. 



RIFLE CLUB AR- 
RANGES SCHEDULE 

Locals To Fire In Series Of 
Matches In W. Va.— Penn- 
sylvania League 



The Rifle Club of L. V. C. which 
was lately reorganized with Charles 
Gelbert as president, has secured 
quite a few engagements with var- 
ious colleges for the coming season. 

The schedule of the team has been 
filled and includes seven colleges and 
universities. The opponents are: 
Gettysburg, Drexel Institute, Carne- 
gie Tech., Penn State > University of 
West Virginia, University of Pitts- 
burgh, and the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

All these engagements are tele- 
graphic matches, excepting the one 
with Penn. State. The team will 
leave for Penn. State on March 3rd. 

All of these schools (which consti- 
tute the Pennsylvania-West Virginia 
League) have good teams, so that 
the local boys will have to do some 
sharp-shooting to keep "in ,the runn- 
ing". 

L. V's first match was held with 
Gettysburg last Friday evening. 



The 1929 Quittapahilla is very 
much "in the making." Long hours 
of planning, cutting, mounting, 
writing, typing, and editing are al- 
ready written "in the books". Prac- 
tically all the art work is finished, 
and the literary work is well un- 
der way. A very attractive cover, 
in keeping with the rest of the 
book has been selected. Subscrip- 
tion campaigns have ben planned, 
and suitable posters may be seen 
all over the campus. The book 
is expected by May Day." It won't 
be long, now!" 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1928 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
J COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



& m , mm ».™» EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chiel 
H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 
Associate Editors 

' MIUM 1 1 CTBW frT * 1 ^ MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

go W valory MARY L. HARTZ, '30 

Athletics "...i G. CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '28 

•Gaio~___:-^__:___ — — - MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

Delphian L\. ANNA B. APGAR, '30 



Kalo 



.MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 



f»Hfte^___ — £ JOHN W. BEATTIE, '29 

fejcfretftL —I—--, - JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

(4 f BUSINESS STAFF 

U9*&»*x IMIK Business Manager 

WWrfte'; . 1 WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circute*MJ»;JV|anager __„_,._^ JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business .Manager , L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUE A7 Wf WALLACE ' HAROLD BENNETT 

y f '-fi - ROBERT 'tt. 1 BUTTERWICK 

; . c . , snriw Subscriptions:-$1:00 Per Year — Single Copies 5 Cents 

Entered at Annyilletfppst-office as second-class matter, under Act of 
I ..lift'. JitoMwA Mwch 3. 1879 




EDITORIALS 



E ( 1 i t( )r ,:- H L as Vi e G ol 1 eg i e n 1 1 < : " . 
De-arf Sir':^— 1 : 

•"•"nfe the frigid room the young' man sat at his table and was 
herpically. endeavoring to study. As he sat there his breath con- 
densed tfe:'\'iipor as if he had been outdoors seated on a snowbank. 
To p-oteCtiVi'mself/frdni'the cl^mp and chill he had wrapped him- 
sem^he-^lahlKet from his Sefl." ' 

.n'iMor.this -is- noKar-gMropBe"' of -a studen'ts hovel in a refugee 
camp of Asia Minor or Russia. It is an ordinary and familiar 
happening- in our own men's dormitory; and the student is paying 
for the privilege of diving 'in it.! This condition is not something 
new or umisalv ;but : it exisjts night after night, for weeks during 
e^wy^yeau. . In spite g of sickness and in spite of funerals, one 
(jii^^ dittle; section ; qf- radiator is still expected to heat the 
w Role 'room.' I 



Men 
AND 
Women 

"At no moment of a man's life is 
he either more or less than he is at 
every other moment of his life." 

* * * * 

v "Men never analyze women. They 
take them just as they find them — 
So they love to say — but they rarely 
leave them so!" 

* * * * 

"Men never change. That is the 
tragedy of men's lives. Women al- 
ways do. That is theirs." 

— Sarah Bernhardt 




"A man's love of truth is often 
little more than his fear of suffering 
from a lie." 

— Eleanora Dase 



"Women remember the first kiss Ions?- 
after men have forgotten the last. ' 

— Remy de Gourmont 



"Women have a wonderful instinct 
about things. They can discover any- 
thing except the obvious." 

— Oscar Wilde 



"Every man over forty is a 
scoundrel." 

"There are no perfectly honorable 
men; but every true man has one 
pint of honor and a few minor ones." 

— G. B. Shaw 




the heakf&^uthoHt'ies \<-ould have to the condition. 



.. The students ip, these noomS are paying a reasonable renl 
Strait is only fair fo expect'that the college provide heat, eit be- 
^^'.fa ws^^^DQia' Sufifsiuanj Aq 'installing adequate rad- 
iators^ : "- •: *-■■■ •>>•■ < 

But perhaps the college regards the pneumoniadv-ee- 1 ^. 
dlrni-fJTie^a'fid "cold of tliese rooms as one if its sacred and hallow- 
ed'>fra^Mt^lts,'a^d of'-cbiirse it'would be just too dreadful to break 

Wilf '\'bu piibrish this "letter" in a coming edition of "La 
-•• ^ —ESKIMO 



WHAT'S WRONG WITH LA VIE? 



an*, pfs' the : saline olrl -stbry— but let's turn a new leaf with the 
s&foon?l';«eme J ster and not 'heaV it again. How can you expect a 
l)fii&e}i'.pi®fect to. your iideatif -you do not tell us what you want? 
T^^ajV^e. .can't -grow, unless, the --students support it, by bring- 
in$..to v it . th^ir. suggestions. Be sure that your suggestions are 
sound aiid tliaf' they are compatible with campus' newspaper con- 
(frnoris 6 - arid send Viii in ! ! f ' 

mitt* oh *>'••* w ■;' a • ■<■ ' 



The work of a few correspondents appears in this issue 
Ijttivs twuw from some more ! 



,s.*j»v.*v >.'... 



STUDENT HONOR 

Week .'of examina'ticMis calls forth a reconsideration of 
tJie^lVonbr .system. It' is a well knwn fact that college men do 
qh^Caim'tn^Lt .tf^6y dp . not foel any loss of dignity in so doing. 
Soma Cdnejife*JW^ lipieraf (Miough to say "(10 ahead 

aini^Vfjeaf';' Y/.)U _ aren't fo<)Ii'ng. me,— you are fooling yourself/' 
Theirtil^i t pf .t^lie matter is that pottle of the testing methods now' 
en^jjtfoye'^^^ storing away of great 

quaijitkies of factual \ \\\U trmatiiui.. Daily quizzes, weekly quizzes, 
antl jenji guizzps are devised to get at facts. The whole system 
lertds'Ttsjdrto cheating!'' Tlujs it COtHfe argued that cheating is 
no l(\ss' ! )i,, disreputable form of education than the factual rote 
edueati( in'.''.. .Is" factual' 'rote, education necessary? Is it wise? Is 
(cheating' natural' here?. " Is it excusable? Would ethe honor sys- 
tein. h<:!j.).L...AVl.iut. do. YDII.thLnk? 



"Man the bad child of the uni- 
verse." 

— James Oppenheim 



"A self-made man? Yes — and wor- 
ships his creator." 

— Henry Clanp 



Ugliness, (noun): — "A gift of the 
gods to cerain women, entailing vir- 
tue without humility." 

— Abrose Bierce 



"Every woman should marry — p.nd 
no man." 

— Disraeli 



"Lastly, no woman should marry 
a teetotaller, br a man who does not 
smoke." 

— Stevenson 



"There are only two kinds of wo- 
men, the plain and the coloured." 

— Oscar Wilde 



'Cherchez la femme!" 



-Dumas 



"Man has his will — but woman has 
her way." 

— Holmes 



"I expect that woman will be the 
last thing civilized by man." 

— Meredith 



"It has been said that all sensible 
men are of the same religion, and 
that no sensible man ever says what 
his religion is. So all sensible men 
are of the same opinion about wo- 
men and no sensible mn ever says 
what that opinion is". 

— Samuel BuPer 



. "You see dear, it is not true that 
woman was made from man's rib; 
she was really made from his funny 
bone." 

— Barrie 



. "It is a woman's reason to say I 
will do such a thing because I will." 

— Burroughs 



'0 wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



—BURNS 



'These be the times that try men's souls." 



Exams in chapel give the student a great moral uplift. 



None should be perplexed if many Frosh are absent after 
semesters. ;Notice these definitions received by their English in- 
structors 

Peruse^ — queer. 

Ex. He was a peruse old man. 

Rancid — having a sour smell or taste. 
Ex. He is rancid. 

Dipsomania — improving the mind in a religious way. 
Ex. (Missing— in spite of the three weeks of revival meet- 
ings.) 

Delitescent — transparent. 
Ex. The girl wore a delitescent dress. 
(N B— See our next for further extracts.) 



Perhaps some of those Frosh aren't so ignorant after all. 



A rumor has lately come to this worm's ears that West Hall 
girls must toss a coin in order to choose their dates. Just imagine 
what will happen when the second semester begins and the Frosh 
men are loosed. 



Now why should Prof. Stokes appear embarrassed and smile 
when the evangelist, speaking in chapel, mentioned "a certain 
camnus activity", and the "sweet womanhood of Lebanon Val- 
ley"? 



Professors Wagner and Bennet engaged in an automobile 
race as a means of settling the eternal argument— "Which is the 
better car, Hudson or Oakland?" Due to the absence of Prof. 
Reynolds' Peerless the finish was a tie and the argument is still 
unsettled, although there is a tacit understanding that Peerless 
beats them all. 



It happened a long time ago, but its too good for the worm 
to keep. Prof. Stokes helped to lift the offering at the U. B. 
Candlelight service before Christmas. Its always an inspiration! 
to see a prof practice what he preaches. 



Lebanon Valley is becoming famous for its crar> courses. 
Prof. Shenk recently received a letter addressed to "II Valley 
College." The professor must have know n how to shoot crap- 
How else would he have seen the joke? 



Latest Kollege Kutup Komio ! ! 
"THE THREE MUSKETEERS" 
Cast of Characters: Dr. Butterwick 

liible 54 — in conference assembled) 
Bunny Miller and 2' accomplices (one of 
them with red hair). 

Synopsis of Action: 

Dr. Butterwick is lecturing on Isaiah etc, to Bible 54 class 
Rap on door is heard. Dr. Butterwick answers rap. 

The hero and associate heroes disappear and (lit across cam- 
pus. 

Moral: Was that nice? 



The comedy reviewed above was a rousing success. 



The pastor of Albright College has offered a $5 prize for the 
best thousand word theme on the subject — "How can we p'"^ 
to the people on campus that honesty is the best policy". Su c J 
an offer made to L. V. students would be considered an insult- 
Hie latter are proving every day that the maxim isn't true. 



Math' 
Vice) 
Bnivei 
The fi 
depose 
Ration 
define 
opinio: 
is no 

imp° rt 
Since 

has bt 
dent a 
voted 
their : 
little 
be ad 
tive b 
had b; 
these 
studer 
will b( 



StU( 

sylvar 

belief 

{or th 

cause 

const r 

refuse 

becau: 

Christ 

sity. 

Dr. 
pensb 
celebr 
nesda 
exerci 
presei 
and a 
studei 
tion v 
and E 
respoi 



The 

sity \ 

Atwo( 

for s 

bers 

board 

ffiedir 

of cr 

The 

publii 

act p i 

Howe 

them; 

they 

Pre 
sever 
a sti 
Neari 

In 

titan 
*ania 
tion 1 
Hock 
Tame 
trol 1 
in To 
Riont 
a Sp( 
the p 
»f th 



—The Campus Worm 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1928 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



, »— ■ ■.■..■.....■■» — ......... h . — ^ 

Abdication 

, Madison, Wis. (by New Student Ser- 
vice) -Student government at the 
University of Wisconsin is no more, 
fhe faculty has accepted the self- 
(jeposed student senate's recommen- 
dation that its charter be considered 
defunct, and thereby has seconded the 
opinion of student leaders that there 
jg no reason for maintaining an un- 
important unnecessary institution, 
gince 1916 the men's student senate 
jias been the highest council in stu- 
dent affairs. In October, the members 
voted to disband, after deciding that 
their actual powers were few and of 
little import. Self-government will 
be administered by five administra- 
tive boards. Centralization will be 
had by the union of the chairmen of 
these five bodies in supervision of 
student elections. Otherwise there 
will be no central board of control. 



Hear No Evil 
Students at the University of Penn- 
sylvania will not hear expounded the 
belief of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Atheism, be- 
cause that organization has "nothing 
constructive to offer to students." The 
refusal of audience is not surprising 
because the decision was made by the 
Christian Association of the Univer- 
sity. 



Dr. Ezra Lehman, president of Shio- 
pensburg State Teachers College, 
celebrated his 57th birthday on Wed- 
nesday, January 18. At the chapel 
exercises on Tuesday morning he was 
presented with a basket of sweetpeas 
and a sum of money in gold by the 
students and faculty. The presenta- 
tion was made by Prof. J. K. Stewart 
and Dr. Lehman made an appropriate 
response. 



Explanation Wanted 

The student body of Clark Univer- 
sity has aked President Wallace W. 
Atwood to explain to them his reasons 
for suspending four students, mem- 
bers of the Clark Monthly editorial 
board. They have also demanded im- 
mediate reinstatement, without loss 
of credit, of the suspended writers. 
The presidential discipline followed 
publication in the magazine of a one- 
act play. This was declared "obscene." 
However^ the students have allied 
themselves with the editors, whom 
they have given a vote of confirence. 
i President Atwood came into notice 
several years ago when he broke up 
a student meeting at which Scott 
Hearing was the speaker. 



In order to work in the famous 
titamin laboratories at the Pennsyl- 
vania State College under the direc- 
tion of Professor R. A. Dutcher, the 
Rockefeller Foundation has sent Dr. 
Tamoh Ikeda, in charge of food con- 
trol for the bureau of public health 
ln Tokio, Japan to the College for the 
toonth of January, He plans to make 
a special . study of vitamin factor in 
toe pasteurization and other processes 
°f the preparation of milk. 



Canadian Union 

Representatives from 18 Canadian 
diversities gathered at Toronto dur- 
the Christmas holidays for the 
" r st conference of the National Fed- 
6r ation of Canadian University Stu- 
nts. The new organization passed 
0n numerous projects, from selection 
°^ a debate team to represent the 
^ion in international contests, to 
^ e Ps toward obtaining for the stu- 
nts of Canada reduced fares from 
fa 'lroads. A proposal for exchange 
^Warships between the institutions 
1? the federation met with approval. 
. ^ Canadians showed a capacity for 
'^mediate action rare in the /arious 
^erican collegiate unions. . 

— New Student 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



DELPHIAN GIRLS 

PRESENT PROGRAMS 



On Friday evening, January 20. 
Delphian girls under the guidance of 
the senior girls, took the final trip 
of the season to China. Sara Lou 
Rose gave a most interesting talk up- 
on Chinese customs, as found in the 
Chinatowns of America. "Kay" 
Flinchbaugh truly created Chinese 
atmosphere, when she appeared ein 
Costume, to tell the girls about Chi- 
nese dress. A resume of Chinese lit- 
erature and art was read by Irene 
Schell. 

The meeting held on Friday, Jan- 
uary 27, offered the girls a backward 
look . through song, in pantomime 
style. The program was as follows: 

"Love's Old Sweet Song", Ruth 
Cooper; "Old Black Joe", Ruth 
March; "On a Train from Bangor, 
Blanche Cochran, Mildred Lane; 
"There's a long, long trail a winding", 
Edna Gorski, Mildred Lane; "Katy. 
beautiful Katy", Kay Bowers, Marian 
Heaps; "I was seeing Nellie Home". 
Dorothy Boyer Violet Morton; "Sil- 
ver Threads among the Gold", Ruth 
Liller, Mildred Umholz; 

This literary session was followed 
by a brief business session at which 
time it was announced that, due to 
the general delay in campus affairs, 
caused by the remodeling of the 
Chapel, Delphian will celebrate its 
Sixth Anniversary on Saturday even- 
ing, March 3, 1928, at 8 P. M., instead 
of Februrary 17, 1928. 

The Delphian Literary Society con- 
gratulates the Clionian Literary So- 
ciety on its successful Fifty-seventh 
Anniversary. 



CLIOS CELEBRATE 

57TH ANNIVERSTRY 

(Continued from Page 1) 



the familiar, "My Heart at Thy Sweet 
Voice", given by Mrs. Edith FrantZ 
Mills, accompanied by Miss Ruth 
Engle, both members of Clio. The 
final number of this section of the 
program was the welcome address by 
the president, Mabel Hafer. 

"Riders to the Sea", a tragedy in 
one act by J. M. Synge, one of the 
most powerful one-act plays in the 
language, followed. Alice Kindt, as 
Maurya, ably handled this quite dif- 
ficult role. Anne Gordon, Elsie Reid- 
er, Corrine Dyne, Huzel Baily, and 
Marion Hoffman completed the cast, 
with Norman Vanderwall, Roy Flook 
and Harvey Nitrauer, members of 
other societies, assisting in the pro- 
duction. 

The "Bell Hop Hop", a tap dance 
featuring Mirian Hershey and Flo- 
rence Miller, changed the atmosphere 
at this point. The dance was follow- 
ed by a group of smoothly rendered 
French Pastoral songs, by Nelda 
Spatz. She was accompanied by 
Grace Daniel. A clever Russian 
dance by Ruth Light and Mabel Haf- 
er concluded this part of the pro- 
gram. 

Leah Harpel, Benetta Burrier, and 
Carol Brinser, in Oliphant Downs' 
"Maker of Dreams" gave a charm- 
; ng and delightful performance in a 
charming and delightful play.' This 
was the last number on the program 

The reception was held in North 
Hall instead of the Alumni Gymna- 
sium, which is the usual place. Real 
Clionian refreshments were served, 
every dainty representing Clio in 
some way or other. 

The Clionian girls are grateful to 
Mary K. Wallace, to whom they are 
indebted for much of the success of 
the program. 



TWO PROGRAMS ARE 

GIVEN AT KALO 



Regular literary programs of Kalo 
were given on the nights, January 
?nth and 27th. "Pep" and little "in- 
side dope" characterized both ses- 
sions. Of late, much interest is mani- 
fested in the literary value of these 
presentations from time to time, 
which tends to make for a "bigger 
and greater Kalo. The program for 
January 20th, the theme of which 
was "Nature", is: 

Trees, Henry Aungst; Butterflies, 
Donald Eberly; Birds, Dominic Ca'.y- 
brese- Plants, Lawrence Derickson; 
Vocal Solo, Miles Kiehner. 

The program for January 27th, 
is as follows: "American Evolution", 
being the theme. 

America Talks to the Air, Joe 
Bruno; The Development of our Rail- 
roads, J. Witmer Allwein;' Designs of 
1928 Motorcars, Homer Allwein; Quar- 
tette, i Kiehner, Russell, Morgan, 
Sh.roy.er; Debate, Resolved: That wo- 
man is superior to man. Affirmative 
Berkhov, Kleinfelter; Negative Reber, 
Reiber. 

The Kalozetean Literary Society 
congratulates its sister society, Clio, 
on the celebration of its Fifty-seventh 
Anniversary. 



LEBANON VALLEY 

CO-EDS WIN TWO 

(Continued From Page 1) 



The scores follow: 

Gettysburg Game: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G F V 

Meyer f — — 10 20 

Lane f _______ _ 515 25 

J. Miller c ____ ___■_.___. 

I. Miller sc _________ 

Gorski g „ 

March g — Q 

Fi eeman g . _ 

Cochrane g — it 

Total _— 15 15 45 

GETTYSBURG 

G F I 

Fischer f __- 2 10 14 

Greenaway f ----- 9 1^ 

Horn c i 0^ 

Smith sc - 

Henne g r — 

Manges g I 

Bowers g AS << 

Total _. — — 11 10 32 

Referee — Mayer. 

The West. Md. Game 

LEBANON VALLEY 

; " G F P 

Meyer f — -- 3 17 

Lane f _ — 2 6 10 ; 

Freeman f 

J. Miller c - 

I. Miller sc _— 

Gorski g _, — 

Cochrane g 

Total 5 7 I? 

WESTERN MARYLAND 

G F * 

Engle' f _-•—_—' — 

Miles, f WUJ B °- 6 

Murphy f - ___— ^— — 4 1 9 

Johnson c — fc 

Thombufg c '__: •_■__•__- 

Todd sc — . 

Cochrane sc — ^ 

Wheeler g '— 

Willinger g _____ ptA** 0- <» 

, Total 4*; 4 7 1 15 

! Referee — Lehr. 



PHILOKOSMIANS 

GIVE TWO MORE 



A wide variety of subjects furnish- 
ed the material for the programs of 
Philo on the past two nights of meet- 
ing, with the material ranging from 
the discussion of a national problem 
to a dispute on a local campus ques- 
tion. The programs were: 

January 20: "The Nicauraguan 
Problem," Abraham Dohner; "Saxo- 
phone Solo", H. Howard Hoy; "An 
Ideal Girl", Herbert Welker; "The 
Glee Club Outlook", Calvin Keene; 
"Main St. No. ? ? ?", Earl Wolfe. 

January 27: "What the Glee Club 
Did for Me", John Rojahn; "Hearts" 
John Beattie; "Polishing the Ivories", 
Harold Rider; "Debate: — Resolved: 
That Lebanon Valley Cllege shou'd 
adopt the Freshman rule in regards 
to athletics next year", Rudy Cunja^K, 
upholding the proposition, won the 
judges decision from Glenn Bendigo. 
"Mid-Year Spooks", was left to Ches- 
ter Johnson. The society was fortu- 
nate in having Prof. Alexander Craw- 
ford and Kenneth Reissinper present, 
and both made remarks suitable to. 
the occasion. 

Philo wishes to take this opportun- 
ity of expressing to its sister society, 
Clio, the most hearty congratulations 
upon the successful celebration if 
another anniversary, and to declare 
its best wishes for the coming year. 



FOUR DEBATING 

TEAMS AT WORK 

(Continued From Page i) 



The affirmative men's team consists 
of Keiser, Aungst Snyder, and Keene. 
The negative is upheld by Behney, 
Sheetz, Oyer and Wallace. The first 
men's debate is with Juniata on the 
23rd of February. Mr. Lutz is man- 
ager of the men's teams while Miss 
Shaeffer handles the business affairs 
for the co-eds. 

The question as formerly printed, is 
the abandonment of the present sys- 
tem of primary elections. One even- 
ing last week Prof. Shenk spoke to 
all the debaters on the subject i 
and discussed the proposition from its 
general angles. 



One of the largest mid-year com- 
mencements^ held in recent years at 
the Pennsylvania State College will 
take place February 7. The eligible 
list at present includes the names of 
84 young men and women who may 
qualify for graduation, and a numi^r 
of advance degrees will be awarded 
also. All six schools of the college 
will present candidates for diplomas. 



_ n H_G 1 li w C 

LJaJCJ; o 



House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 



••t r 

.;. fit ! 



Near Annville , 



c* 1{LMM i AIM S> 



Meals Served at All Hours . vi 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 

. ■ . . ■ ■ ■ • i m .'•>/., c ; ( y ( r. i ft lift i f 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY , 



Annville 



PIANOS • 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 1 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music sSe 

738 Cumberland Street . 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 



CIRCULATING LIBRARY 



GRIMM'S 



KODAKS & SUPPLIES,. FILMS, o 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING-- 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Printing — Publishing, 
Advertising 
Annville — . ,— . Penna. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. B ASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. : , 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 



THE HUB 



713 Cumberland Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



I GU/Z'C '/'O'T.'SC. 

36 North Eighth Street, 



Photographs of Quality 

BLAZIER & MILLER 

LEBANON, PA. 



F 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1928 



Y.W.-Y.M.C.A. Notes 



QUOTATIONS FROM ADDRESSES 
GIVEN AT DETROIT CONVENTION 



The easy optimism of the old order 
was staggered and shaken by the vast 
volcanic upheave! of the world war. 
Like a war-mine exploded, it rent 
wide the ordered strata of our com- 
placent world. It was not only a 
decisive and weakening war between 
the "Christian" nations; it not only 
destroyed but disillusioned; it reveal- 
ed the ghastly evils of our semipagan 
civilization. The new generation, 
like the new world, has seized upon 
the idea of "Self-determination" with 
a vengance. It takes nothing for 
granted. It demands the right to live 
its own life, formulate its own beliefs 
determine its own objectives. 

G. Sherwood Eddy 



There is another fallacy that is 
widespread, and that is that it doesn't 
make any difference what you do or 
where you do it; that it is the kind 
of person you are that counts. A 
little common sense would show the 
nonsense of that. 

For who would say, for instance, 
that Thomas Edison would have been 
as great a servant Of mankind had 
he been a drug store clerk, mixing 
sodawater with all of the skill and 
efficiency he has been using to ferret 
out the secrets of nature these past 
fifty years. 

H. P. Van Dusen 



r 



Alumni Notes 



Homer Wiest ( 1927, has accepted a 
position as assistant in Chemistry at 
New York University. At the same 
time he is doing graduation work in 
that department. 



Ruth Heister, 1922, has accepted a 
position as instructor in French and 
English, at Lynnhurst, N. J. She has 
has just completed her work for the 
M. A. degree at Middlebury College 
Middlebury, Vt. 



Robert Steinmentz, who receive! 
his A. B. degree at L. V. in 1874, 
passed away in Annville, Pa. on Jan- 
uary 17, 1928. 



The Boston Chapter of the Lebanon 
Valley College Alumni meets infor- 
mally every few months for a social 
evening at one of the homes. The 
officers are as follows: President, 
Galen D. Light;, Secretary and Treas- 
urer, Willi am E. Herr. The members 
of the group include Galen D. Light. 
1899; Mrs. Bruce Parker (Nora 
Spade), 1900; William E. Herr, 1907; 
Stanley R. Oldham, 1908; Fred Frost, 
1911; Mrs. Fred Frost (Verda Snyder) 
1911; William 0. Ellis, 1911; Mrs. 
William E. Herr (Ada Beidler), 1918. 
I might say that the members of the 
group are engaged in the following 
activities: Mr. Light is secretary and 
comptroller of Northeastern Univer- 
sity, an educational institution main- 
tained by the Boston Young Men's 
Christian Association. Mr. Oldham 
is secretary of the Massachusetts 
Teachers Federation. Mr. Frost is 
the teaching staff of the High School 
at Allston, Mass., Mr Ellis is president 
of the New England Insecticide Co., 
Mr. Herr is Activities secretary of the 
Boston Branch of the Army and Navy 
Y. M C. A. 



L. V. BREAKS STREAK 

AFTER FOUR LOSSES 

(Continued From Page 1) 



LEBANON VALLEY 

Gelbert f 5 

Shroyer f 

Piela f 4 

Miller c 

Wheeler c 1 

Albright g 1 

Bell g 

Piersol g 

Wood g 

Total 11 

MT. ST. MARY'S 

Ryscavage f 6 

Connell f 

McGarrigan f 4 

McCall c 3 

Kerrigan g 1 

Hemler g 5 

Total 19 

Referee — Ebberts. 



10 


3 11 



1 3 

2 4 



6 28 

12 

1 1 
1 9 

4 10 
1 3 
1 11 
8 W 



Westminster, Md., Jan. 19: — 

Western Maryland won a hard 
fought game from Lebanon Valley 
here to-night 38-24. The remarkable 
playing of Broil was responsible for 
Western Maryland's victory. Lebanon 
Valley outscored the Westminster 
team in the second half, but Broil's 
individual efforts maintained the lead 
of the first half. Miller was Lebanon 
Valley's big gun, with 14 points. 
LEBANON VALLEY 

Gelbert f 3 6 

Piela f 3 2 8 

Shroyer f 

Miller c 5 4 14 

Wheeler c 10 2 

Bell g 1 2 

Albright g 2 2 

Piersol g 

Total 13 8 34 

WESTERN MARYLAND 

Broil f 7 10 24 

Ellis f 113 

Machamer c 2 15 

Longridge c 

Van Buren g 113 

Smith g 1 1 3 

Total 12 14 38 

Referee — Day. 



Annville, Pa., Jan. 24: — 

Lebanon V alley ( after suffering de- 
feat in the last four games, came 
back into the win column by defeat- 
ing Susquehanna in a loosely playei 
game, 51-29. Assuming a lead at the 
very beginning, the Annville five was 
never headed. Susquehanna seemed 
lost when they had the ball, not 
knowing the first thing about taking 
a ball through a five man defense. 
Wall starred for Susquehanna with 
eight two-pointers. Piela, Gelbert 
and Miller starred for Lebanon Val- 
ley. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

Gelbert f 6 12 

Laury f 10 2 

Piela f 6 6 17 

Shroyer, f 2 4 

Wheeler c 

Miller g,c 2 2 6 

Brubaker c 10 2 

Albrihgt g 

Bell g 3 6 

Piersol g 10 2 

Total 22 7 51 

SUSQUEHANNA 

Gerhart f G 

Paralysis f 

Wormly f 2 1 !3 

Dixon c 13 5 

Winters g 

Wall g 8 2 18 

Spade g 

Moser g 11 

Total 11 7 29 

Referee — Boyer. 

WHEELAND CONmj<"TS 

CHAPEL SFRVICFS 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Wheeland, being a University grad- 
uate, well understands the needs of 
the students and therefore empha- 
sized the development of our spiritual 
as well as our physical and mental 
lives. The students are grateful for 
his helpful talks and advice. 



GLEE CLUB PRO- 
GRAM ARRANGED 

(Continued From Page I) 



The program follows: 

Alma Mater Arranged 

The Lost Chord Sullivan 

Sanctus Moir 

Glee Club 
An Encounter with an Interviewer.- 

Mark Twain 

Mr. Behney and Mr. Beattie 
The World is Waiting for the Sun- 
rise Sie^z 

Three Flies Barrett 

O Mistress Mine Barrett 

Quartette: — Mr. Oyer Mr. Bollinger 
Mr. Russell Mr. Mentzer 

The Bells of St. Mary's Adams 

Haste to the Bower of Robin Hood 

Moffat 

The Hunter's Farewell __ Mendelssohn 
Glee Club 

Polish Dance Scharwenka 

Rustle of Spring Sinding 

Mr. Horst 

To the Spirit of Music Stephens 

Murmuring Zephyrs Jensen 

Glee Club 

A Girl to Order Springer 

The cast:— 
Dudley "Dud T ' Elliott, a senior 

Mr. Oyer 

Howard "Lady" Clayton, a junior 

Mr. Bollinger 

Fred "Puck" Evans, also a junior 

Mr. Horst 

Earl "Biscuits" Nelson^ a sophomore 

Mr. Beattie 

Mr. Elliott, "Dud's" father 

Mr. Behney 

Elsie Jordan, "Dud's" fiancee 

Mr. Russell 

Bass solo Selected 

Mr. Carpenter 

The Blind Ploughman Clark 

The Lamp in the West Parker 

Wanderer's Night Song Lenz 

Glee Club 
The personnel of the club includes: 
Prof. Alexander Crawford, Director; 
J. Bruce Behney, President; O. Pass 
Bollinger, Business Manager; Jacob 
M. Horst, Vice-president; C. Lanston 
Mentzer, Secretary; Russell C. Oyer, 
Treasurer; Jacob M. Horst, Pianist. 

Fist Tenorsr^John W. Beattie, '29; 
Russell C. Oyer, '29; David J.' Ed- 
munds, '29- Kenneth L. Russell, ; 

Second Tenors: — Forrest W. Miller, 
'29; E. Oscar Sneath, '30; Earl E. 
Wolfe, '31. 

First Basses: — O. Pass Bollinger, 
'28; Harold C. Rider, '29; Allen E. 
Klinger, '29; J. Calvin Keene, '30. 

Second Basses: — J. Bruce Behney, 
'28; Luther M. Rearick, '29; C. Lans- 
ton Mentzer, '29; H. Wesley Carpen- 
ter, '31. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORrS 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



FROSH AMUSE IN 

THURSDAY CHAPEL 



The new Chapel was not properly 
dedicated until the Men's Senate pro- 
vided a Freshman entertainment on 
Thursday morning a week ago. Five 
Frosh were on the bill. Of these 
Mayhew ; Tetter, Ainsworth and Mill- 
er were guilty of socks charge, while 
Wolfe was convicted on a girl 
charge The entertainment consisted 
of a relay peanut-race, a silent-solo 
and speech by Wolfe, and then a 
quartet by the other four. 

The Frosh are finding it very diffi- 
cult to wait until the girl rule goes 
off. Grant was before the Senate on 
a girl charge also, but he pleaded 
guilty and was let off easy with a 
speech and mouth organ parade be- 
tween halves of a basket ball game. 

We wish to take this opportunity 
to again state that the college loves 
its Freshmen. 



READERS DIS- 
CUSS WALPOLF 



The regular bi-monthly meeting of 
the Reader's Club was held at the 
home of Dr. Wallace, Thursday night, 
January 26th, having the writer, 
Hugh Walpole, as the subject of dis- 
cussion. These meetings from time 
to time afford amusement as well as 
instruction. At every gathering of 
this club a writer and his works is 
discussed, the discussion resulting in 
a greater appreciation of literary 
men and their accomplishments. 

Upton Sinclair and his works will 
be the basis of discussion for the 
next meeting. 

The order of the program on the 
night of January 26th is as follows: 

Jeremy at Crale, James Hazelton: 
The Cathedral, Dorothy Boyer; Har- 
mer'John, Marian Hoffman, Mary Cly- 
mer; General discussion. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

LumL jr and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

UNION EMBLEM CO VALL EY^TRUST^ BUILD.NO 
Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS-TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 



A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY 



STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 



THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE. 



SUCCESS 
TO DELPHIAN 
ON HER SIXTH 
ANNIVERSARY 



Itfit Collfti 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1928 



MYLINMEN TAKE 
OVER OLD RIVALS 



Blue and White Basketeers 
Swamp Albright With Twenty 
Point Margin 

Lebanon, Feb. 10: — 

Coming from behind after trailing 
at the end of the first half 16-15, 
Lebanon Valley swamped their old 
rivals, Albright, under an avalanche 
of field goals and one pointers to 
win 51-31. 

The game started off with a bang 
and it looked as though fouling would 
be the favorite pastime of the even- 
ing. Both sides being persistent of- 
fenders. 

Karlip of Albright opened the 
scoring by making good on a free 
throw. Piersol of L. V. followed 
with one tying the score. Wissler 
scored from the field; Gelbert made 
good on a free throw. Piersol fouled 
Clemens who made good one of 
his two foul chances. This gave Al- 
bright a two point lead. Piela tied 
the count wtih his first field goal. 
Wheeler swished the net for two 
points and Piela followed with an- 
other. Clemens scored a foul. Miller 
replaced Wheeler for L. V. and im- 
mediately proceded to drop in two 
(Continued on page 4.) 



LADIES' AUX. PRO- 
GRAM IS GIVEN 



Co-eds Appear On St. Valentine 
Program Given In 
North Hall 



The Ladies' Auxiliary of Lebanon 
Valley College met in North Hall 
Parlor, February 10, at 3:30 o'clock. 
The program was carried out by the 
co-eds of L. V. This month there 
are so many holidays and events, that 
it was decided to give a varied pro- 
gram trying to cover everything of 
importance during the month. Sketch- 
es were given on the lives of our 
two greatest presidents, George 
Washington and Abraham Lincoln, 
who were born this month. Valen- 
tine's Day was represented by Nelda 
Spatz who gave some vocal selections 
in her charming way. The famous 
"tap dancers" Miriam Hershey and 
Florence Miller danced for the ladies 
and were graciously received. A sil- 
(Continued on page 3) 



CO-EDS SPONSOR 

VALENTINE PARTY 

A delightful Valentine party was 
given in North Hall parlor yesterday 
afternoon under the auspices of the 
Y. W. C. A. The room was very 
beautifully decorated thus displaying 
the real spirit of St. Valentine. 

The feature of the party was the 
huge valentine box from which for- 
tunes were drawn by the guests. This 
Proved very interesting as well 
amusing. Everyone received "a 
kick" out of the descriptions of the 
different destinies that were drawn. 

Besides the members of the Y. W. 
the faculty members' wives played a 
v ery important role in this affair. 
After the regular order of the pro- 
gram, refreshments appropriate to 
the occasion were served. 



LOCAL FOLK ON 

LEBANON PROGRAM 

The members of the Junior Wo- 
man's Club of Lebanon were enter- 
ained by representatives from Leb- 
anon Valley College on Saturday af- 
ternoon, Feb. 11. 

Since it was Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege afternoon at the club, the pio- 
gram was given by Lebanon Valley 
students and a member of the 
faculty. Those who took part in the 
program were: Miss Mary K. Wal- 
lace, professor of English, Miss Nelda 
Spatz and Miss Hilda Hess. 

Miss Wallace, whose ability as a 
reader is well known, gave several 
readings. They were, "The Highway- 
man", by Alfred Noyes and three 
lyrics written by modern authors. 
Miss Nelda Spatz sang three French 
songs and Miss Hilda Hess played 
Brahms' Rhapody No. 2 on the piano. 



1901 GLASS PRE- 
SENTS NEW BOOKS 



Library Receives Twenty-Three 
New Volumes In 
Class Gift 



The class of 1901 has recently pre- 
sented the library with twenty-three 
volumes, all of which are of immedi- 
ate and considerable use. The library 
is constantly adding books to the 
shelves, and to publish the lists each 
week would be rather out of place, 
but, of course the conditions here 
are not the ordinary ones. The fol- 
lowing books were presented: 

Pullim and Wiltshire, X-rays; 
Dewey, Democracy and Education; 
Hines, Junior High School Curricula; 
Thomas-Tindall, Junior High School 
Life; Smith, Junior High School; 
More, Judaism; Huebner, Life Insur- 
ance; Huebner, Marine Insurance; 
Secrist, Introduction to Statistical 
Methods; Long, Cases on Constitu- 
tional Law; Sait, American Parties 
and Elections; Koakes-Jackson, Life 
of Saint Paul; Bradby, Great Days of 
Versailles; Glover, Democracy in the 
Ancient World; Schelling, Shakes- 
peare and "demi-science"; Chambrum, 
Shakespeare, actor-poet; Bill, Alas, 
Poor Yorick;, Rostovtzeff, History of 
the Ancient World; Bryce, Modern 
Democracies; Oberholtzer, History of 
U. S. Since the Civil War; Jolley, Al- 
ternating Current Rectification; Kent, 
Mathematical Principles of Finance; 
Essig, Insects of Western North 
America. 



HAMMONDS HOSTS 

TO LIBRARY STAFF 

Mr. and Mrs. Bayard Hammond 
entertained the library staff at an in- 
formal party at their home in South 
Hall on Tuesday evening, February 
7. The evening was spent in play- 
ing games and guessing the carica- 
tures of various poets. Another fea- 
ture was the guessing of various lines 
of poetry. At a late hour delicious 
refreshments were served and the 
guests all felt the party was a very 
delightful event as an "antidote" to 
examination week. 



TAKE CARE OF 
THE CAMPUS, PLEASE ! 



L. V. G. STANDS HIGH 
IN TEACHER OUTPUT 



Statistics Reveal Interesting 
Facts Concerning Teachers 
Graduated Here 

Some very interesting statistics 
have been received from the Penna 
Dept. of Public Instruction. They con- 
sist of a table giving the number of 
provisional college certificates issued 
for the past seven years to graduates 
of colleges and universities in Penn- 
sylvania accredited by the State 
Council of Education. 

Lebanon Valley College has reason 
to be proud of the showing it has in 
these figures. The total for the last 
seven years indicate that only ten 
colleges in the state had issued more 
teaching certificates than our college. 
The following gives the first eleven 
colleges in the list and the total num- 
ber of certificates in each case for the 
last 7 years. 

(Continued on page 3) 



LOCAL GO-EDS 

WIN AND LOSE 

Albright Girls Break Blue And 
White Streak After 
Five Wins 

Carlisle, Feb. 4: — 

The fast Lebanon Valey sextette 
defeated the Dickinson Co-eds here 
to-day 45-30. This is the fifth, suc- 
cessive victory for the Annville girls 
who have setting a fast pace all sea- 
son. The clever work of Meyer and 
Lane was outstanding. The passing 
of the lest of the team was fine. They 
(Continued on Page 4) 



ANDY ROY PAYS 
VISIT TO CAMPUS 

Well Known And Well Liked 
Visitor Addresses Several 
Meetings During Stay 

Andy Roy, who is travelling in the 
interest of Young Peoples' Christian 
work among the colleges, spent f ro 
Sunday until Tuesday on our campus. 
Mr. Roy is well known to those wh < 
have visited Eagles Mere from time 
to time, for he is quite active in the 
work of the conferencee there. 

In the few days that he spent here 
Mr. Roy addressed several meetings, 
using the remainder of his time in 
discussing campus Y. M. C. A. work 
with Mr. Bheney, president of the 
cabinet, and others who were inter- 
ested. The visitor spoke to the Y. M. 
C. A. group on Sunday night, to the 
Student Volunteers on Monday, and 
to those who attended Chapel on 
Tuesday morning. His talks were in- 
teresting and stimulating, for Mr. 
Roy, in the years that he has spent 
in the Y . M. C. A., Student Volunteer, 
or World Student Work, has made 
many and various contacts that are 
proving of worth and meaning. 

Graduated from Washington and 
Lee in 1925, he has spent a year since 
that at Princeton, studying English 
literature. Mr. Roy expects to study 
at Edinburgh— Andy i" Scotch' - 
within the next year. 



FOUR NEW STU- 
DENTS ENROLLED 



With the opening of the second 
semester, four new students have 
been enrolled at Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege. Two are the boarding students 
and two day students. 

Hilda Hess from Waynesboro, Pa. 
a music student, who has spent one 
year at the conservatory of music of 
the college, is taking up her work 
as a sophomore. 

Oscar F. Stambaugh of Markels- 
ville, is a transfer from Dickinson 
College as a sophomore, and Theo- 
dore M. Focht of Lenanon, another 
Sophomore is a transfer from Gettys- 
burg College. 

Harold Lee Gingrich of Lawn, Pa. 
who attended L. V. C. from 1923 to 
1925 has resumed his studies as a 
Junior. 



STAR COURSE ENDS 
WITH "IN ROMANY" 



Last Number of Star Course 
Provides Delightful Even- 
ing in New Chapel 

The Blue Danube Light Opera 
Company concluded the Lebanon Val- 
ley College Star Course series on 
Monday evening in the Engle conser- 
vatory, and delighted the large audi- 
ence with the charming operetta. 
"In Romany." This brilliant and 
captivating number was written by 
Sando Radanovits, who is the musical 
director of the Redpath Bureau and 
who composed many of the outstand- 
ing musical plays featured by the 
famous Montangue Light Opera Sing- 
ers, an organization which preceded 
the Blue Danube singers in the Ly- 
ceum field. 

The scene for the operetta was laid 
in the fascinating atmosphere of a 
Romany gypsy camp. A young 
American Naval officer appeared, 
and over the flickering flame of a 
gypsy fire he met his love and played 
his part in her surprising destiny. 
The production was artistically and 
imaginatively staged, for the players, 
in costumes accented by bits of vivid 
gypsy coloring, formed a striking 
picture against a background of 
picturesque Romany woods- 

In addition to the operetta, a splen- 
did program of N grand concert num- 
bers was presented by the compa^ . 
The entire program showed a ver- 
(Continued on page 4) 



READERS TO TAKE 

UP UPTON SINCLAIR 

The Reader's Club fo L. V. C. will 
meet tonight at the home of Dr. and 
Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace at 7:30. The 
club will discuss the works of Upton 
Sinclair whose late book "Oil" has 
been translated into almost all the 
languages of the world. The book 
"Oil" will be reviewed by "Red" 
Keiser and Mike Kiehner. "The 
Goose Step" by Mae Hamer and Mad- 
eline Rife; and "Money Writes" by 
A.llison Mayhew and William Tetter. 
The program for the next meeting 
will be a discussion of J. M. Barrie 



TAKE CARE OF 
THE CAMPUS, PLEASE ! 



»— ~- ■ ■ — — * 

BEAT 
SCHUYLKILL 
SATURDAY NIGHT 
| PEP! PEP! I 



NUMBER 9 



DELPHIANS GHOOSE 
MARCH 3RD DATE 

Plan Exceptional Program For 
Sixth Anniversary 
Of The Society 

Delphian Literary Society will cel- 
ebrate her Sixth Anniversary on Sat- 
urday, March 3, this date having 
been selected after the delay of the 
anniversary of Clio, its sister society, 
and for other reasons tending to 
make the "big events" run just a 
little behind time. 

Although the youngest society on 
the campus, Delphian has always had 
reason to be proud of her programs 
and promises that this one will be 
typically Delphian. The feature of 
the excellent program will be a full- 
length play, which has been carefully 
chosen. The cast, under the direction 
of Miss Mary K. Wallace, is working 
hard, and their enthusiasm insures 
success. 

The reception, as in the case of the 
other anniversary this year will be 
held in North Hall. The girls are 
planning to put forth every effort 
to gain a real home-like, cheery, and 
comfortable effect. 

The members of Delphian extend a 
cordial invitation to everyone to at- 
tend both the program and the re- 
ception. 



EXTENSION SCHOOL 
GROWING YEARLY 



This Year Proves No Exception 
As Courses Are Given 
In Two Cities 



"The present year in the Extension 
School of Lebanon Valley College," 
said Prof. Paul S. Wagner, Chairman 
of Extension Committee, "is the most 
successful year that has ever been 
experienced." The present enroll- 
ment is an increase of about 25% over 
that of last year. There are about 
300 matriculations, but since some are 
taking more than one course the 
actual number of individuals is 225. 

The faculty of the Extension School 
is the regular College faculty. Work 
is offered pursuant to the Master's 
Degree and also toward the State 
Certificate. There are courses offer- 
ed in Bible, Chemistry, English, 
French, German, History, Mathema- 
tics, Psychology, and Social Science. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



WALLACE CHOOSES 

JUNIOR PLAY CAST 

The Junior class held tryouts for 
its class play "You Never Can Tell" 
by Bernard Shaw, under the direc- 
tion of Dr. P. A. W. Wallace on Fri- 
day afternoon, January 3. There 
was a good representation of the 
class present from which a good cast 
was chosen. 

The cast, which has begun its re- 
hearsals, is as follows: 

Gloria Clandon, Leah Harpel; Dolly 
Clandon, Carol Brinser; Mrs. Clandon, 
Frances Hammond; Mr. Valentine, 
John Beattie; Phillip Clandon, Russeli 
Oyer Mr. McComas, solicitor, Allen 
Klinger; Waiter, Henry Aungst; 
Maid, Nancy Ulrich; Cook, Lawrence 
Derickson; Another Waiter, William 
Emmenheiser. 



fa 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 



IQ28 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 
H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 
Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, *28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '30 

Athletics G. CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '28 

Clio MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

Delphian ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Kalo MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

Philo JOHN W. BEATTIE, '29 

General JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 
ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year — Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 
Marc h 3, 1879 

|__ IEhtukials I 

STATISTICS 

Some very interesting- statistics concerning- teachers and the 
teaching profession have appeared in the last two issues. Have 
YOU followed? 



DEBATING 

Debating is once more a reality on our campus, after a 
temporary ''time-out." We hope it will stay — and w r e wish you 
well, debaters! You have an excellent record to equal— that of 
two years ago. And don't forget: We beat Albright, then! 

Good luck! 



MORE! 

The Y. M. C. A. did a creditable piece of work in having 
Andy Roy here over the week-end. Perhaps it will be possible 
to "repeat" — to have other visitors of his worth here from time 
to time? 



COLLEGE FOR ALL 

Despite more difficu/lt entrance requirements andthe adop- 
tion of various schemes for limiting the number of students, more 
young men and women are in college today than ever. Ninety 
institutions of higher learning this year have a regisration of 
297,000 full time students as compared with 283,000 this time last 
year. 

To many this is a "race between education and catastrophe,,. 
But to us at Lebanon Valley there should be little reason to 
worry. Certainly, it cannot be proved that a single one of our 
graduates has not benefitted from his College training. And cer- 
tainly no one is sorry for having gone to college. Education has 
and is producing- gteat changes. But this 1 fact is merely a health v 
sign exhibited in connection with the future development of our 
country. If education does not change people it were better for 
them to remain in contented ignorance. 



Antioch College of Yellow Springs, Ohio, has recently made anothei 
departure from the usual system of education, the results of which are 
discussed by its president, Arthur E. Morgan. 

President Morgan introduced a feature called an autonomous program 
of Study. The freshman and Sophomore years have regular, required 
courses of study, like any other college, but the last two years at College 
have self-directed class work under an elective system in that there are 
no lectures, no regular class meetings and the student sees his teacher only 
once aweek, when he reports on what he has done and asks advice if h< 
wants it In some classes the student receives a syllabus and is -left to 
follow it without help; in others he prepares his own syllabus. All tha 
is necessary is that at the end of the five week period he pass an ex- 
amination. 

This is the latest innovation at Antioch, which has tried several orij 
inal educational programs in the past. 




Things Are 
Not Always 
What They Seem 



" Were most historical events 

traced up to their true causes, I feai 
we should not find them much more 
noble nor disinterested than Luther's 
disappointed avarice; and therefore 
I look with some contempt upon 
refining and sagacious historians, who 
ascribe all even the most common 
events, to some deep political cause; 
whereas mankind is made up of in- 
consistencies and no man acts invari- 
ably up to his predominant character. 
The wisest man sometimes acts weak- 
ly, and the weakest sometimes wisely. 

" Those are oftenest mistaken 

who ascribe our actions to the most 
seemingly obvious motives. And I 
am convinced that a light supper, a 
good night's sleep, and a fine morning 
have sometimes made a hero of the 
same man who by an indigestion, a 
restless night, and a rainy morning, 
would have proved a coward. 

" That Caesar was murdered 

by twenty-three conspirators, I make 
no doubt, but I very much doubt that 
their love of liberty »nd of their 
country was their sole or even prin- 
cipal motive; and I dare say that, if 
the truth were known, we should 
find that many other motives at least 
concurred, even in the great Brutus 
himself — such as pride, envy, per- 
sonal pique, and disappointment.. 

" A man who has been con- 
cerned in a transaction will not write 
it fairly, and a man who has not can- 
not!" 

— Lord Chesterfield: "Letters" 



("For his Highness the Governor 
ordered me to call up whatever per- 
sons I would choose to name ") 

"Alexander was called up in the 

room __He assured me upon hie 

honor that he was not poisoned, but 
died of a fever by excessive drinking. 

"Next I saw Hannibal passing the 
Alps, who told me he had not a drop 
of vinegar in his camp. 

" And Ceasar freely confessed 

to me that the greatest actions 
own life were not equal by many 
degrees to the glory of taking it 
away". 

— Jonathan Swift: "Gulliver's Travels 



"Here I am, a no over-good busi- 
ness man, a second-rate engineer. I 
can make poor mechanical drawings, 
I play the piano after a fashion; in 
fact, I am one of those proverbial 
jacks of all trades who are usually 
failures. Why I am not, I can't tell 

you I can find no special ability. 

no one trait in which I excell 

There is certainly something that 
gives some men more than an even 
break." 

—Charles M. Schwab (1928) 
(quoted from a "Judge" Editorial) 



"Whatever the cause, there is not 
known to-day any representation of 
Christ in art that dates before the 
fifth century; so that the first apo- 
cryphal portraits we have to note are 
the multitude of fictitious heads that 
pass, and have passed and will con- 
tinue to pass, as portraits of the 

Saviour 

"The familiar portrait of Patrick 
Henry, with spectacles on his fore- 
head, painted by Thomas Sully, six- 
teen years after Henry's death, was 
founded on Dance's portrait of Cap- 
tain James Cook, which Henry was 
considered to resemble. Likewise the 
so-called portraits of Wm. Penn are 
spurious. 

— From "Frauds in Historic;! 1 
Portraiture", in A. H. A Annual 
Report, 1913. 




'O wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!' 



—BURNS 



Choice bit of Freshman grammar; 

Innocuous: "To renounce the Christian religion." 

Ex: "One must read the Bible in order not to be innocuous" 

Rancid: "Sour". 

Ex: "The man smelled rancid". 

Emanate: "Issue forth". 

Ex.: The girl emanated to his side". 

Ricochet: "Strip of fur or cloth around the neck". 

Ex.: "The ricochet cost her father a large sum." 

Peruse: "Crawl". 

Ex.: "The burglar was perusing in the dark". 



After all when we see our blue-books coming back we find 
that the Frosh aren't the only ones who make foolish mistakes. 



"Gentlemen prefer blonds" but Bendigo prefers them tall 
and heavy with a grey haired shingle and eyes which are able to 
pick out a gentleman from the other bums in the first row at 
Star-course. 



Some one of the Star Course committee should have told th'e^' 
alto to smoke Old Gqlds, "not a cough in a carload." 



The Miller-Piersol tutoring class proves' that a little learn- 
ing is a dangerous thing. 



It never pays to have too many women on the floor — that 
was the trouble with girls' game Friday night. 



Lebanon Valley girls like to plow — that's why the campus 
sod is full of furrowsL After all there's not so much difference 
whether we spend .our money for shoe soles worn out on "Skip-, 
per's Pride" paths, or whether we pay an increase on the matri- 
ulation or tuition bill to cover the cost of resodding the campus 
which we dug up. 



Bunny Miller and Plook are the only boys who bought Val- 
entines this year, and theirs were only ten-centers. 

CAMPUS WORM 



MRS. BENNETT IS 

HOSTESS TO CLASS 



Mrs. Harold Bennett, teacher of 
French and German at Lebanon Val- 
ley College, entertained her Junior 
French Class at her home on College 
Avenue on Saturday evening, Feb. 11. 

The evening was delightfully spent 
in playing French games which weir 
instructive as well as amusing. P 
French spelling bee was held. It 
was somewhat different* from our 
American spelling bees for each ore 
had to spell a French word beginnin 
with the last letter of the word whijh 
the person spelled before. There 
was also a hunt for conundrums, 
written in French, which were hidden 
with the answers at various places in 
the house. The girls were given 
Valentine baskets in which to place 
the verses which they found. Several 
prizes were given during the even- 
ing. In addition to games the girls 
were entertained by radio music. 

After an enjoyable evening of 
French games, even the entertain- 
ment was surpassed by the refresh- 
ments. 



SHENK MENTIONED 

IN TRADE BOOK 



TAKE CARE OF 
THE CAMPUS, PLEASE ! 



Prof. H. H. Shenk, head of the His- 
tory department, has received special 
mention in the introduction to a re- 
cently published account of the 
commerce of Amsterdam with special 
reference to her trade relations with 
the United States under the title, 
"Heet Aandeel Van Den Amsterdam- 
schen Handel Aan Den Opbouw Van 
Het Amerikaansche Gemeenebest." 
The author, P. J. Van Winter, ac- 
knowledges the work of four Ameri- 
cans who assisted him in research 
while in this country, and the fact 
that Prof. Shenk was one of these 
four is a distinctive honor. 

The book is written in the Dutch 
of Amsterdam, and the single para- 
graph in English is the one of ac- 
knowledgement contained in the in- 
troduction in which the author says: 

"Last not least, I wish to render 
homage to so many Librarians and 
Archivists of public nd private collec- 
tions in United States especially 
to you, Dr. V. H. Palsits, Dr. W. 
Ford, Dr. G. Hunt, H. H. Shenk, for 
the way in which you assisted the 
foreigner, while working amongst 
you." 



4 



off 
do 
sti 
de 
da 
las 
idc 
foi 
off 
fla 
ow 
me 

r 

bu: 

at 

La' 

riu 

ing 

in 

is 1 



I 

Col 
of ■ 

coll 
leg ( 
biti 
tior 
nur 
pho 
ber 
by 

tun 
firsl 



T 
Ass< 
ven 
of 1 
gres 
wit! 
in i 
leas 
at t 



Tl 
colic 
M. i 
men 
cen 
vaili 
studi 
ing 
the ( 
out 1 
in te 
after 
atter 
thei r 
the ] 
new 
whic 
if th( 
back 
must 



PI 

"T 
divid 
man 
form 
the r 
the s 
junio 
to a 
frofo 
of Pi 
in Tl! 
to s 
Prob] 
lot c 
flegre 
to sti 
Prese; 
fellov 
, Pro 
iunioi 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 5928 



PAGE THREE 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



Offer of Haverford 

Villanova College authorities were 
offered the use of the Haverforr 
dormitories to assist in housing 300 
students whose living quarters were 
destroyed by a spectacular fire Sun- 
day night, January 29, it was learned 
last week from the office of the Pres- 
ident. According to Dr. W. W. Com- 
fort, who conferred with Villanova 
officials the day following the con- 
flagration, the offer was declined 
owing to the fact that other arrange- 
ments had already been made. 

The total damage caused by the 
burning of College Hall is estimated 
at $2,200,000 by Villanova authorities. 
Laboratories, classrooms, an audito- 
rium, dormitories and valuable paint- 
ings and equipment were destroyed 
in the blaze. The origin of the fire 
is unknown. 



Historic Dickinson 

Plans are being made at Dickinson 
College for an elaborate exhibition 
of the historic material owned by the 
college, but now obscured in the Col- 
lege Library and offices. The exhi- 
bition will consist of a large collec- 
tion of Dickinson lore, including a 
number of very early pamphlets, 
photographs, and writings. A num- 
ber of old and valuable books owned 
by the library; and a few of the lec- 
tures delivered by Dr. Nesbit, the 
first president. 



Optimism 

The Vice President of the Alumni 
Association of the Kanas City Uni- 
versity, speaking to the student body 
of the University said, "Every pro- 
gressive young person is discontented 
with present conditions. He must be, 
in order to advance." This is, at 
least, an optimistic way of looking 
at the "agitators" on our campus. 



Momentary Thrills 

The main trouble existing in moct 
college communities, says Professor 
M. W. Eddy of the Biology Depart- 
ment of Dickinson College in a re- 
cen interview, is traceable to the pre- 
vailing discontent of the present-day 
student body. Young people are be- 
ing brought up on the sensational, 
the exciting, and as a result through- 
out their college life they live simply 
in terms of momentary thrills. Ther 
after college they usually fail in the 
attempt to harmonize themselves with 
their conditions. Discontent with 
the present, a search for something 
new and stimulating is an element 
which must be ruled out of existence 
if the trend of college life is to swing 
back to normalcy. The sensational 
must go. 



Plans a Junior College Career 

"The college curriculum should be 
divided into two parts. The fresh- 
man and sophomore years should 
form a junior college and lead to 
the regular baccalaureate degree am 1 
the senior college, composed of the 
junior and senior years, shou>«! lead 
to a Master's degree." In this way 
Professor Frank Jewett Mather Jr.. 
of Pinceton University, in an article 
in The Educational Review, proposef 
to solve the college problem — a 
Problem of many students who do 
Ipt care to study but wish to earn a 
degree, and others who are inclined 
to study but are hampered by the 
Presence of their less serious-minded 
fellows. 

Professor Mather would prov'de a 
junior college career, leading to the 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



EXTEMPORANEOUS 

PROGRAM AT KALO 



Due to the playing of the Lebanon 
Valley-Albright game on Friday 
night, Kalo held her regular Friday 
night literary session on Thursday 
night, February 9th. Though short 
and extemporaneous, the program 
was of a very interesting nature. 

Oil, Norman Vanderwall: "Sitting 
in" on a U. S. Senate session, Miles 
S. Kiehner; Here and There, James 
C. Hazelton; Editor-Examiner. 

Kalo is getting ready for another 
of her famous anniversary exercises. 
Various committees have been ap- 
pointed and the preparations are 
well under way. Due to examina- 
tions, there was no meeting during 
the previous week. 



Bachelors' degree for those who do 
not aim at scholarship. He would 
admit to the senior college only 
qualified students whose main busi- 
ness at college is to become profi- 
cient in some field of scholarship. In 
the senior college Professor Mather 
would cut down social, fraternal and 
other non-academic activities to a 
minimum. It would be a place of 
serious schblarly work. 

"Any student in the junior college 
may become a candidate for ths se 
nior college either by showing a 
promise of real scholarship on en 
trance or during his two years of 
residence in the junior college .Any 
candidate who fails to maintain high 
standing shall be stricke i from the 
lists, subject to its regulaitons, until 
graduation. 



Editor in a Year 
A young man who graduated in 
1926 from the University of Wiscon- 
sin has been made editor of McCall's 
Magazine — a publication said to have 
2,500,000 readers, says the Christian 
Science Monitor. He is Otis Weise, 
of Davenport, la., who majored in 
Economics because English was "too 
easy" for him. 



The Honors Course at Bucknell 
The faculty of Bucknell University 
has decided to establish an Honors 
Course for seniors majoring in Eng- 
lish, who have received high grades 
and who have done distinguished 
work in their English courses. The 
Honors Course will begin with the 
academic year 1928-29. 

The method of the Honors Course 
is an excellent one. The eligible stu- 
dents spend their last semester in do- 
ing individual and research work at 
their pleasure and leisure. Attend- 
ance at classes and assignments is not 
compulsory and the students are left 
to their own devices. This methoc 1 
naturally affords more time to the 
student for his research and library 
work. Also, he is able to study whe. 
he see fit, and not at stated times. 
\t the end of the semester, the stu- 
dent must submit to an oral exami- 
nation. If he meets the requirement' 
he is 4 given his diploma with distinc- 
tion in English. 



CLIOS ELECT AND 

INSTALL OFFICERS 



Clio's first meeting after her an- 
niversary was held Jan. 28 when her 
new officers were installed, Ruby 
Ann See taking the chair as president, 
the following officers taking the oath 
of office: 

Vice Pres. Grace Daniel; Rec. Sec, 
Jane Fearnow; Corres. Sec. Katherine 
Bork; Chaplain, Esther Angstadt; 
Editor, Olive Morrow; Pianist, Fae 
Bachman; Critic, Olga Freeman. 

After a short intermission a pro- 
gram was given by the Sophomore 
girls called "The Doll Party". Alcesta 
Schlicter with her skit, "Paper Dolls" 
came first. This was followed by the 
"Dancing Dolls", Mildred Saylor and 
Alice Forman who are well known 
for their intricate dance steps. The 
musical dolls, Mary Hartz and Mil- 
dred Myers, gave an illustration of 
how contrary dolls can be playing 
all their pieces backwards on the 
piano. Irene Peter gave a reading 
on "He Dolls and She Dolls", which 
was truly clever. Leah Miller, the 
"Singing Doll", gave two selections 
which were thoroughly enjoyed by 
her audience. This ended the Sopho- 
more Doll Party. 



L. V. C. STANDS HIGH 

IN TEACHER OUTPUT 

(Continued from page 1) 



University of Pitt. 965 

University of Penn. 887 

Penn. State 840 

Bucknell 585 

Marywood College 392 

Grove City College 373 

Allegheny College 358 

Temple University 357 

Carnegie Institute 322 

Gettysburg College 316 

Lebanon Valley 301 

It will be readily seen that in spite 
of the size of our enrollment, Leb- 
anon Valley ranks well among the 
largest institutions of the state. In 
fact when enrollment is considered 
we rank second and press closely for 
first place in the state. The last 
official listing of 'he colleges is in 
the College Blue Book, and this gives 
the figures of 1923-24, which is the 
middle year of the period under con- 
sideration. The following table gives 
the leading twelve colleges, their en- 
rollment for 1924, the number of cer- 
tificates granted,- and also the ratio 
of certificates to the enrollment. In 
other words L. V. had 363 students, 
granted 41 certificates, and there was 
one certificate ganted that year for 
every eight students enrolled. 

Enrollment Teachers ratio 

Westminster 344 41 8 

Lebanon Valley 363 41 8 plus 

Bucknell 904 92 9 plus 

Marywood 400 40 10 

Wilson 385 38 10 plus 

Dickinson 511 44 11 plus 

Allegheny 565 42 13 plus 

Grove City 711 47 15 plus 

U. of Pitt 6517 123 53 minus 

Penn State 5190 97 53 plus 

U. of Penn. __12,787 108 118 plus 

Temple 8402 37 227 plus 

It is not possible to arrive at the 
exact standing of last year but the 
figures would indicate that Marywood 
has taken a great advance to first 
place and Lebanon Valley, also ad- 
vancing, still holds second. For in- 
stance last year from Lebanon Valley 
there were 66 who received degrees, 
and there were 63 certificates grant- 
ed. However not all teach who - 
ceive certificates, but they have suf- 
ficient training when they leave col- 
lege so that they can teach if they 



PHILO PROGRAM 

THURS. EVENINC 



In order to leave Friday evening 
clear for the main feature of the 
basketball season, the Albright game, 
Philo held its regular weekly pro- 
gram on Thursday evening, February 
9. Palmer Slenker. led off the even- 
ing's entertainment with his discus- 
sion on the question, "Does History 
Repeat Iteslf?" Dr. Paul S. Wagner 
felt mathematicaly inclined when he 
presented "Sin X, Cos Y", but Henry 
Kohler changed the atmosphere with 
Lis many "Arrangements." Earl 
Wolfe took the members of the so- 
ciety on a visit to "Main Street, Num- 
ber ? ? ? and the final number on the 
program was the "Living Thoughts" 
of the editor. 

The regular program for Februacy 
3 was necessarily postponed because 
of the work of examination week. 



wish. In the year in question, 1924, 
there were 69 who received degrees, 
and 41 who were awarded certificates. 

It is both interesting and signifi- 
cant to note the great increase of cer- 
tificates earned by college students 
last year as compared with 1921. The 
number receiving certificates last year 
is more than triple that of six years 
ago. This figure indicates that the 
trend of the teaching profession is 
distinctly toward college trained peo- 
ple. 

It will also be noted by one of the 
tables that Lebanon Valley has train- 
ed for teaching 301 people in the last 
seven years. Considering the enroll- 
ment and the various departments 
our college this ?s a very commend- 
able showing. In these last years the 
total number of teachers trained by 
accredited colleges and universities 
is 9,673. In all, there are 63 college", 
and universities in Penna. accredited 
by the State Council of Education. 



LADIES' AUX. PRO- 
GRAM IS GIVEN 

(Continued from page 1) 



houette sketch "When Lochinvar 
Came Out of the West", added a 
touch, of amusement to the program. 
The final attraction was a quartette, 
which sang several numbers, their 
voices harmonizing beautifully. 

After the program tea was served 
and the refreshments were truly sym- 
bolic of St. Valentine's Day. Every- 
one had an enjoyable afternoOn. A 
vote of thanks was given to all those 
who worked to make it such a suc- 
cessful afternoon. 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville _ _ _ _ _ Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

KODAKS & SUPPLIES, FILMS. 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING-- 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Printing — Publishing 
Advertising- 
Annville Penna. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa, 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 



THE HUB 



713 Cumberland Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



36 North Eighth Street, 



Photographs of Quality 

BLAZIER & MILLER 

LEBANON, PA. 



PAGE FOOT- 



LA VIE GOLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1928 



Y.W.-Y.M.C.A. Notes 



I 

The Y. W. C. A. Cabinet held a 
regular meeting last Thursday even 
ing at the home of Mrs. Bennett Be- 
sides some very important business, 
there were several Y. W. problems 
up for discussion. Thtt these were 
handled successfully and interesting- 
ly is largely due to the "homey" at- 
mosphere at the Bennetts'. Among 
the affairs planned last Thursday was 
the Valentine Party which was held 
for the co-eds yesterday afternoon 
in North Hall Parlor. This is but one 
of the affairs planned for thh year. 



r 



A Y. W. C. A. Confeience was hek 1 
last week-end at Howard University, 
Washington, D. C. Eleanor Snoke, 
'28 attended the conference as a rep 

, resentative of Eagles Mere and chair 
'nian of that region. There were about 
fifty colored students at the confei- 
ence, representing the colored col- 
leges of the south. The president of 

-Howard University— one of the Ing- 
est schools in the country for colored 
folk— is Mordecai Tohnson, who 
well known as an outstanding leader 
of the negro race. I>an Slow, who 
is' Dean of Women, is very capable, 
possessing a keen understanding of 
her girls' problems. 

Problems of negro abilities, their 
character and personality, the misfor- 
tunes caused by part of the race, 
and the question of race justice were 
discussed. Howard University, pos- 
sessed of a fine campus and splendid 
buildings, and helping to mould anct 
direct the character and destiny of 
hundreds of negroes, is a credit to 
the race. 



bright dropped in the winning field 
goal just a minute or two before the 
final whistle blew. The accurate- 
shooting of Meyer and Lane in pre- 
vious games this season was missing 
to-night. 

Nervousness was probably the chief 
cause of the defeat, a nervousness 
that could have been avoided. Miss i 
Deck played a star game for Al- 
bright. 

ALBRIGHT 

G F P 

Deck f 3 6 12 

Detlerline f r 1 - 2 

Painter c-g - - - 

Stauffer c - - 

F. Wilker sc-g - •- 

Miles sc - • 

Hangen g - - 



LOCAL CO-EDS 

WIN AND LOSE 

(Continued from page 1) 



worked the ball quickly to their for- 
ward who had little difficulty wit!: 
their guards. Poticher play a fine 
game for Dickinson's girls. 

LEBANON VALLEY 
G 

Meyer f *0 

Lane f 10 

J. Miller c 

I. Miller sc — 

Cochran g 

Gorski g 

Freeman g 



F P 

20 
5 25 



5 45 

F P 

2 22 



■i Total 20 

DICKINSON COLLEGE 
G 

Poticher f 10 

Greene f * 

Amnion c 

Ferris sc - 

Dando sc - 

Kaufman g 

Laird g 

Ferris g 

Hartman g - 



Total 14 2 30 



Lebanon, Feb, 10: — 

Lebanon Valley Co-eds' winning 
streak of five straight was shat- 
tered by the Albright team here 
to-night 14-13. Entering the game 
as favorites the Lebanon Valley Sex- 
tette put up their poorest game of 
the season. The team work that was 
outstanding in their earlier games 
was missing. This may have been 
due to two causes. The girls were 
overly anxious to win and under a 
nervous strain due to the doubtful 
playing of the game until the last 
minute. Then, the strict interpreta- 
tion of the rules by the officials, who 
failed vo allow pivoting, which inter- 
fered with their team work may have 
helped. The Misses Gorski and Coc'n- 
ran at guard were the redeeming 
features of the Blue and White at- 
tack. 

The game was closely contested 
throughout, neither side having pos- 
session of the ball very long. Al- 



Total 4 

LEBANON VALLEY 
G 

Meyer f 2 

Lane f 2 

J. Miller c 

I. Miller sc-c - - 

Showers sc 

Cochran g - 

Gorski g 

Freeman g 



6 li 

F P 

1 5 

4 8 



gave L. V. the lead, after which they 
were never headed. During the last 
six minutes, Albright failed to score, 
while Lebanon Valey swished the net 
for thirteen points. 

Piela and Albright starred for Leb- 
anon Valley. Wheeler's work at cen- 
ter was his best game of the year. 
Clemens and Sheril were the big guns 
for Albright^ 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G F P 

Gelbert f 1 3 5 

Piela f 6 4 16 

Wheeler c 4 8 

Miller c 2 2 6 

Piersol g 5 5 

Albright g 4 19 

Bell g 10 2 



Total 18 15 51 

ALBRIGHT 

G F P 



Total __. 
Referees- 



4 5 13 



-Graeff and Zerbe. 



EXTENSION SCHOOL 

GROWING YEARLY 

(Continued from page 1) 



The extension work is conducted 
both in Harrisburg and in Lebanon. 
In Harrisburg the classes meet in 
Cental High School, and in Lebanon 
it is also at the High School. The 
classes convene at either 4:30 r ■ 
7:00 in the evening, on the various 
days of the week decided upon each 
year in September when the classes 
are organized. Each sesseion is two 
hours in duration, and meets once a 
week. 

In Harrisburg alone there are a- 
bout 100 who are working for de- 
grees, so that these courses are of 
great value, enabling many teachers 
and others to broaden and complete 
their training, while pursuing their 
regular work. 



STAR COURSE ENDS 

WITH "IN ROMANY" 

(Continued From Page 1) 



satility of talent seldom found on 
the Lyceum stage. The company 
includes James Durham, tenor; Hilda 
McMillen, soprano; Ralph Steffcn, 
basso; Mildred Macon, contralto; and 
Madalen Massmann, accompnist. 

Plans for the 1928-29 Star Course 
are going forward rapidly under the 
able direction of Russell Oyer, chair- 
man of the committee, but no definite 
arrangements have yet been made 
for entertainments during the com- 
ing year. 



MYLINMEN TAKE 

OVER OLD RIVALS 

(Continued from page 1.) 



two pointers. Sherid took Gunther's 
place at center for Albright and soon 
after broke into the scoring column 
by tapping one in from under the 
basket. The score stood 12-9. A 
field goal and a foul made it 15-9 
favor Lebanon Valley. Clemens 
scored a two pointer and a foul, mak- 
ing it 15-12. With just a minute to 
play Sherid and Karlip each rang the 
bell giving Albright the advantage at 
the end of the first half 16-15. 

In the second half Albright contin- 
ued their spurt and had a five point 
lead on goals by Clemens and Horn. 
Jap Albright scored a field goal for 
L. V., Clemens scored a foul. Jap 
Albright followed with a foul and 
two pointer, which with Piela's goal 



Brown f 113 

Horn f 2 15 

Day f 

Karlip f J 2 15 

Gunther c 

Sherid c 2 2 6 

Wissler g 113 

Gelbert 

Clemens g 3 3 9 



Total 

Referee — Pollock. 



.11 9 31 



Angle f 10 2 

Ment'zer c ' °' 2 8 

Tripizan c 3 3 

Balz g 3 3 9 

Tuber g 3 3 

Total 17 19 53 



BLUE AND WHITE 

DROPS TWO MORF 



Mylinmen Lose To Dickinson 
And Georgetown U. 
In Fast Games 



Carlisle, Feb. 4: — - 

Dickinson College defeated Leb- 
anon Valley here to-night 53-42 in 
a fast, rough game. There was plenty 
of scoring by both sides and the fast 
rough play for back-board balls 
brought the spectators to their feet 
time and again. 

Dickinson led at the end of the 
fist half 22-17. Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege tied the score at the beginning 
of the second half. The game was 
nip and tuck from here on until the 
last few minutes, when Foreman and 
Mentzer came through with four field 
to put Dickinson ahead. 
Piela was the star of the game with 
21 points. Sweely starred for Dick 
inson. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G F P 

Gelbert f 4 3 11 

Shroyer f ^ 2 2 

Piela f 9 3 Zi 

Brubaker f 

Wheeler c 3 3 

Miller c 

Piersol g 

Albright g 2 2 

Bell g 11 

Total -—13 16 42 

DICKINSON 

G F P 

Sweely f 7 4 18 

Foreman f 3 4 10 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



Washington, Feb Hi — 

Fresh from their victory over their 
rivals Albright, Lebanon Valley's 
quintet received a set-back from 
Georgetown here to-night 54-29. 

The first half, play was close and 
lively, Georgetown only leading 26- 
18 at half time. The pace proved too 
fast for the Annville Collegians in 
the second half. Their hard game 
the night before slowed them up, and 
Georgetown had little trouble forg- 
ing ahead. 

Piela and Gelbert played fine bas- 
ket-ball for Lebanon Valley. Nork 
and McCarthy were the outstanding 
performers fo Georgetown. 

LEBANON VALLEY 
G 



F P 

10 



12 

2 



Gelbert f H 5 

Shroyer f 

Piela f 6 

Wheeler c 1 

Miller c 

Albright g 2 15 

Bell g 

Piersol g 

Laury g 

Total 14 1 29 

GEORGETOWN 

G F P 

Nork f 6 1 13 

Slezosky f 

Mesmer f 4 8 

Dunn f 

Dutton c 4 j 

Calen c 

McCarthy g 6 12 

Brynes g 10 2 

Neeman g 5 1 11 

Griffinth g o 



Total 

Referee — Ebberts. 



.25 2 54 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

LnmL by and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 



LEBANON, 



PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

ttisithxt T?ivi"Dr riu r^/^v VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 
UNION EMBLEM CO PALMYRA, PA. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS-TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 



A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE. PA. 



j BEAT 

ALBRIGHT 
J TOMORROW NIGHT 

[ BOYS GIRLS 



fmit ftnWtyitmt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SUPPORT 
THE JUNIOR PLAY 
WED. MARCH 14 



VOLUME III 



RECITAL G 



VEN AT 
LOCAL CHURCH 



U. B. Church Sponsors Excel- 
lent Recital By Frank Mc- 
Carrell And Elsa Meiskey 

Many of the students and a large 
audience of the townspeople listened 
to a talented rendition of classical 
music on Tuesday evening in the 
United Brethren church. The organ 
and song recital was by Frank A. 
McCarrell, organist^ and Elsa Meiskey 
soprano. 

Frank A. McCarrell is one of the 
able men who constitutes the large 
army of church musicians in the 
United States. Mr. McCarrell is or- 
ganist and choirmaster of the Pine 
Street Presbyterian church of Harris- 
burg. He has given numerous re- 
citals and has been director of Harris- 
burg Choral Union, an organization 
giving the standard oratorios; the 
Harrisburg Solo Choir, whose mem- 
bers are the leading singers of the 
city; and the Wednesday Club Chor- 
us, this body being the oldest musi- 
(Continued on page 4) 



L V. REPRESEN 
AT GET 



ED 

YSBURG 



"World Expansion Of Christian- 
ity" Is Main Theme 
Of Convention 



J The Y. M C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 
of L. V. C. sent six delegates to a 
mid-winter "Y" and Student Volun- 
teer Conference at Gettysburg from 
Feb. 24-26. The following were on* 
representatives: from the Junior class, 
Jane Fearnow and Mildred Umholtz; 
from the Sophomore class, Madeline 
Rife; and from the Freshman class, 
Elizabeth Engle. The girls of each 
class were allowed to elect their own 
delegate. The Y. M. sent only two 
representatives, Lawrence Derickson 
and Frederick Christman. 

The conference was a follow-up of 
the great Detroit convention in order 
to bring some of the great issues of 
that conference to those who were 
unable to go to Detroit. The main 
things that were considered were the 
challenges involved in the Work! 
Expansion of Christianity. The con- 
ference group was divided into small 
commissions with a leader at the head 
to discuss such topics as:I The appre- 
ciation of other Religions and Cul- 
tures; II Christian Unity; III Mu- 
tuality in Missions; IV Qualities of 
Christian Training Needed Today; 
(Continued on Page 2.) 



SOPH-FROSH GIRLS 

PLAN FOR B. B. GAME 



It won't be long now before the 
Soph and Frosh girls will clash oti 
the gym floor for their yearly scrap 
«n basketball. The tentative date se t 
for the game is March 20 at 7:30 P.M. 
Jim Wallace has been selected by the 
Sophomore class to coach the girl. - 
Who have already started practice. 
The Frosh have not yet taken defi- 
nite steps in preparation for the "big 
Event", but it is rumored that there 
l s plenty of good material in the '31 
pmp. 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, MARCJ I i, 1928 



NUMIiKk' [o 



SALES CAMPAIGN 

PROVES SUCCFS,' 



The Sales Campaign for the Quittie 
has been progressing rapidly. Quite 
a unique idea was used in the cam- 
paign, that of placing upon the plat- 
form in chapel a "thermometer" for 
each class. Up to the present time 
the Senior class is far in the lead 
with a subscription of about 97%. 
The Sophomore class follows with an 
average of about 85%, and the Frosh 
lass is far behind the other two class- 
es with an average of 75%. Wayne 
Sparrow as Sales Manager and*Archie 
Lutz as Business Manager deserve 
much credit for the success of this 
campaign. The above mentioned sub- 
scriptions > together with the Alumni 
ones, and of course, those of the 
Juniors j who are publishing the book 
will make the total at least thre.> 
hundred. 



GIRLS ANNOUNCE 
DEBATE SCHEDULE 

Schuylkill Debate On March 6, 
Is First On Schedule 
For Co-Eds. 

The girls f the debating team are 
busy preparing for the debates to be 
held with various colleges this season, 
the first of which will be on Mar. 6. 

The girls of the debating team art- 
fine team. Last year was the first 
time that Lebanon Valley had a girl's 
debating team. In fact they took the 
place of the boys team last year. This 
year the college has an excellent 
boy's and girl's team. The speakers 
for the affirmative side are Lean 
Harpel, Captain; Miriam Muth ; first 
speaker; and Mary Clymer, alternate. 
On the negative side are Mary Ax. 
captain; Ruth Liller, first speaker; 
Dorothy Heister, second speaker and 

Emmelme Shaeffer alternate. The 

> 

question to be debated upon this year 
is "Resolved that the system of pri- 
mary elections in state and national 
offices should be abolished. 

Quite a few engagements have been 
secured with various colleges. The 
girls will debate with Schuylkill. 
Bucknell, Albright, .,uniata and Eliz- 
abethtown College. 

The first debate will be held on 
Mar. 6. The negative side will talk 
here and the affirmative at Reading. 



STUDENTS HEAR 
MAKE-UP LECTURE 

Miss Wallace Delivers Worth- 
while Lecture To Interested 
Students in Chapel 

A very interesting and instructive 
lecture on the art of make-up was 
given by Miss Mary K. Wallace of 
the English Department in the Chapel 
on the evening of Feb. 21. There 
were a goodly number of interested 
students present to take advantage 
of this enlightening lecture. 

After the final instructions were 
given each one present was given the 
opportunity to show (on someone 
else!) what he or she had learned. 

This is the first time for several 
years that any such class was held, 
it being successful. Miss Wallace 'in- 
tends to hold another one in a veiy 
short time, so all those interested are 
invited to attend. 



SENIO 



1 GIRLS EN- 
ERTAINED AT TEA 



Mrs. Gossard Is Hostess At First 
Of Series* Of Teas For 
Four Classes 



The girls of the Senior Class were 
delightfully entertained at a tea Fri- 
day afternoon, Feb. 24 at the home 
of Mrs. G. D. Gossard. 

The home which has jusl been re- 
modeled and enlarged, was beauti- 
fully decorated with a cherry tree in 
the middle of the table and various 
other decorations in keeping with 
Washington's birthday. 

The program was furnished by 
members of the Sophmore class. Hilda 
Hess played the well known piano 
solo "Liebestraum" by Liszt. "The 
Answer" by Terry was sung by Leah 
Miller. Madeline Rife ; dressed like 
a spinster of bygone days, read "My 
Poor Feet", "At Dawning" was sung 
by Miss Miller with a violin obligato 
by Alcesta Slichter, accompanied by 
Miss Hess, oi) the piano. Miss Slich- 
ter also played a violin solo, "The 
Swan" by Saint Saens. Gladys Knaub 
gave a very clever ode to the Seniors 
after which refreshments were serv- 
(Continued on page 3) 



B. B. QUINTET DRDPS 
ONE^WINS THREE 

Loses to M-berg, Rut Wins Over 
Schuylkill, Urisinus 
And F. And M. 



Allentown February 17: — 

Muhlenberg stopped the strong 
Lebanon Valley five here to-night 
39-30. This was Muhlenberg's first 
basketball victory over the Annville 
Collegians in the last six years. 

The game was close and rough 
throughout, Muhlenberg leading a. 
half time 19-16. Only in the last few 
minutes was Muhlenberg able to pull 
sufficiently ahead to win by 9 points. 
(Continued on page 4; 



NEW CADET CROP 

BESIEGES A. H. S. 



The War will soon be over! The 
new crop of Neophytes are advanc- 
ing steadily in the last drive of a 
memorable campaign. The final 
sqadron of Cadet Teachers more 
than a score in number, with colors 
flying in the winds, and singing 
lustily their paean "Neophytes For- 
ever", swooped down upon the High 
School last week. 

Repeatedly besieged by fresh and 
renewed forces during the long 
months of winter the beleaguered in- 
stitution, with resistance cOnstantly 
waning is now as good as surrender- 
ed. Indeed it is a remarkable event 
in history that a group so poorly 
equipped in the batteries of warfare 
(having single wad bean-shooters) 
were able to withstand and retaliate 
so many repeated assaults. 

While we rejoice with our heroes 
and heroines who, under the teachers' 
banner have about won a signal 
victory; yet we deem those of the 
opposing forces who have so long 
withstood the onslaught, as not with- 
out honor. 



ZOOLOGY CLASS GOES 

ON TRIP TO H'BURG. 



The Zoology class of the Biology 
Department of L. V. C. went to Har- 
risburg on Thursday afternoon, Mar. 
1, to see the Insect Exhibit which is 
being held in one of the buildings 
on the capital grounds at Harrisburg, 
under the auspices of the Bureau of 
Plant Industry oi the Penna. Dept. 
of Agriculture. 

More than 50,000 specimens of 
11 000 different species of Penna. In- 
sects were on display. Attendants 
are present to explain the various 
phases of the collection and to ans- 
wer questions pertaining thereto. 

The purpose of the exhibit is to 
demonstrate how and why an insect 
collection is maintained ar.d to give 
everyone an opportunity to see and 
understand the species that have at- 
tracted their attention. 



"QUIT 



IE" E0IT0 
CHOSEN FOR 1930 



Hazelton Is Selected As Editor 
And Keene Is Made 
Business Manager 



James C. Hazelton was selected to 
edit the 1930 Quittapahilla and J. 
Calvin Keene was chosen to manage 
the business affairs bf the annual 
publication of the Junior class at an 
election held Monday ? February 13. 
Other officers to serve on the staff 
of the year book will be chosen by 
these two heads in pursuance of the 
custom established in the selection of 
the 1929 staff. It is expected that 
this matter will be disposed of within 
a very short time, and that prepara- 
tions will go forward for an outstand- 
ing publication next year. 

Both of the newly elected office -s 
have been prominent in extra cur- 
ricular activities. Mr. Hazelton is a- 
present serving appointment on the 
staff of the La Vie Collegienne while 
Mr. Keene is engaged in assisting the 
business manager of the Men's Glee 
Club. 

Contracts for the 1930 Annual have 
not yet been let, but this question 
will also be settled wihin the next 
week or so, and actual work can then 
be started. 



LOCAL CO - EDS 

WIN AND LOSE 



Taste Second Defeat Of The 
Season After Winning Sec- 
ond From Schuylkill 



Annville, February 18: — 

Lebanon Valley's Co-eds complete- 
ly overwhelmed the Schuylkill Sex- 
tette here to-night 43-6. Schuylkill 
rarely had possession of the ball. The 
score might have been greater, had 
not coach Stokes seen fit to use many 
subs. Fourteen girls were used in 
the game. This was the Co-eds' sec- 
ond victory of the season over the 
Schuylkill girls. 

The entire L. V. team played ex- 
cellent basketball. Gruenberg and 
Lomneth were Schuylkill's outstand- 
(Continued on page 4) 



DELPHIANS TO PRE- 
SENT SIXTH ON SAT. 



Many Alumnae And Friends 
Expected — Reception To Be 
In North Hall 



On Saturday evening^ March 3, at 
eight o'clock, the Delphian Literary 
Society will observe its Sixth Anni- 
cersary, as previously announced. 
Every committee has been working 
steadily, and all arrangements are 
completed for making this the most 
successful anniversary in Delphian's 
history. 

Those taking part in the Chapel 
entertainment have been practicing 
faithfully, and expect to be thorough- 
ly prepared for the "Big Show' 4, b^ 
the end of the week. The play cast, 
under the direction of Mary K. Wal- 
lace ) is putting on the "final touches". 

Many alumnae and other ex-Del- 
phi ans are expected to return for the 
anniversary. The reception will be 
held in North Hall, following the 
agreement made this year by the four 
societies. 



GLEE CL 



OB RETURNS 
FROM INITIAL TRIP 

1928 Club Reports Successful 
Receptions On Coal 
Region Trip 

The Lebanon Valley College Men'« 
Glee Club returned last Friday from 
its initial concert tour of the 1928 
season, and all reports seem to in- 
dicate that the club ensemble of 1 
year far surpasses that of previous 
years. This season promises to be 
the most successful in every way in 
the history of the club. 

Under the personal direction of 
Prof. Alexander Crawford, the group 
sang in Lebanon on Thursday, Feb- 
ruary 16; in Lykens on Saturday and 
Sunday; in Tower City on Tuesday; 
in Pine Grove on Wednesday and in 
Valley View on Thursday. Members 
of the club were well received and 
well entertained in each of the towns, 
and in return presented a program 
which was heartily appreciated from 
beginning to end. 

The Lebanon sponsors had as the 
outstanding feature of the evening 
an interesting entertainment for the 
club members after the concert was 
over. The party was staged in the 
Moose rooms, and everyone thorough- 
ly enjoyed the recreation provided. 

Lykens was the second stopping- 
place for the club, and while a snow 
storm somewhat hampered activities ; 
both Saturday and Sunday were pro - 
fitably spent in the town. Prof. Craw- 
(Continued on page 3) 



MISS ENGLE PLAYS 

ON CLUB PROGRAM 



Miss Ruth Engle, head of the Con- 
servatory Of Music of Lebanon Val- 
ley College^ appeared on the program 
of the Spring Musicale given by the 
Woman's Club of Lebanon. A fea- 
ture of the program was a group of 
three trios, violin, by Mrs. Elwood 
Greist, Cello by Miss Hilda Gingrich, 
and piano by Miss Ruth Engle. Miss 
phine Strassner ; mezzo-soprano. Miss 
Strassner is a teacher of voice at Al- 
bright College. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH ., [928 




lalieColkjiennt 

PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chiel 

H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 
Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '30 

Athletics G. CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '28 

Clio MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

Delphian ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Kalo MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

Philo JOHN W. BEATTIE, '29 

General JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year — Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



EDITORIALS 



TOO LATE 

"TEAM OPENS UP TOO LATE"— So runs many a Colege 
headline. In the last quarter, the team let loose with a terrific 
attack that rushed the opposition off its feet, but it was too late 
to win. 

We wonder how many thousands of students in the last 
twenty-five years have realized in the last quarter of their course 
that they had not "opened up". Ever\ r day we hear College men 
say that if they had only realized what it was all about, — if they 
could only have the chance to go through again they would really 
do something. 

College weeks seem shorter than other weeks because they 
are drowded with so many opportunities. They go by before 
we know what is happening. Before we knew it, it was Thanks- 
giving, and the Albright game was over. Then Christmas, with 
all the time that we were going to use reading something worth 

while. Mid-year exams loomed before u3 as, well, they 

are gone now, and just around the corner is Easter, May Day, 
and GRADUATION DAY. Whittier must have had the College 
student in mind when he wrote: 

"For of All the Sad Words of tongue and pen, 
The Saddest are these: It might have been!" 



SAM SPEAKS 
(A Campus Talk) 

As we are leaving the gym after having transacted our business there, 
we pass two fellows who are talking together in hall. This remark reaches 
our ears, "If a fellow has a drag around hefre he can get whatever he 
want*" Our attention is immediately arrested, and we turn to find that 
the speaker is Sam Sophomore — a man who has been here nearly two years 
now, and whose opinion is respected as coming from one who "knows the 
ropes." 

After due apologies for a no-business interruption^ we ask Sam to elu- 
cidate; this he does partially, but his definition of terms is as vague as they 
make them. Evidently 'drag' sounded collegiate so he used it; we are 
impressed that the statement itself came out because it appealed to Sam 
as beling sonorous, and meeting this subtle test, was unsubjected to the 
nobler one of truthfulness. We add our ruckle's worth: 

"Do you think ( Sam,, that the heavy meal you ate this noon has any- 
thing to do with your general mental attitude? It's hard for us to see i Sam, 
that your statement is premeditated; it appears to be most inconsistent for 
we find ourselves in a world where the only way a 'drag' works is down! 
No man ever rose to success because of a 'drag'; we seriously doubt that 
anyone ever really advanced a single inch in this way. If in practical im- 
possibility this intangible, unreal thing ever did slide a door of opportunity 
open for a fellow, it most certainly never translated that opportunity into 
accomplishment for business is Missburian and demands 'special delivery'! 

r*It hurts^ Sam boy, to hear a college man talk like that, for such 
statements usually come from cheap help — poor mortals whose life has been 
made so by the drudgery of mechanical labor and the incapacity of rising 
aniy Ivigher than the daily rut, that eventual honors obtained at the cost 
of life itself appears to them to be merely the result of a 'drag' or 'pull'. 

"Not an oration, Sam just want to say that things don't work tha.1 
way. The man at the glass-top desk may seem to have his nose in the air 
but the chances are that he has had it on the grindstone for years, and 
just because he is turning the crank is no sign he isn't still sweating. 

"So long, don't want to make you late for that next class. Wish that 
you would check me up when you hear me make a statement like that of 
yours bcause with most declarations Of that sort folks are liable to think 
that one has a tough case of jealousy. "Four cut of five have it." See you 
later." 

— WHEATON "RECORD" 




" Some Definitions" 

"LIFE is a tale 

Told by an Idiot; full of sound and 
fury; 

Signifying nothing." 

- — Shakespea* ; 



"Our JOYS are composed of shadow. . 
The supreme smile !• God's alone." 

— Hugo 



"Happiness is a rare accident. It 
comes, sometimes, in brief flashes to 

those who have learned to do 

without it." 

—Don Marquis 



"LOVE is the embroidery of the 
imagination upon the stuff of na'.ure." 

— Voltaire 



"THE WORLD is ourselves." 

— George Moore 



"WOMAN'S at best a contradiction 
still." 

— Pope 



"SHAKESPEARE (was) a poet 
clever enough to make his country- 
men believe that he was merely a 
playwright." 

■ — Noel Coward 



"LIFE is a circle, and no one can 
tell where it begins and where it 
ends — ■ For instance, a mouse is afraid 
of a man; a man is afraid of a wo- 
man; and a woman is afraid of a 
mouse " 

■ — Fulton Aursler 



"MAN is various." 



-Conrad 



"THIS EARTH -what a wonderful 
onion it is!" 

— Havelock Ellif 



"CONGRATULATIONS (N) — The 
civility of envy." 

— Ambrose Bierce 



'TIME is the supreme illusion." 

— Amiel 



"THE MOON is a curving flower o^ 
gold." 

— Sara Teasd-'e 



"VIRTUE is the art of appearing 
chaste." 

— Eleonora Duse 



"BEAUTY is Truth, 

TRUTH, Beauty ' 

— John Keat- 



"A CYNIC is a man who knows the 
price of everything and the value 
of nothing." 

— Oscar Wilde 

"GARTER (N.)— An elastic band 
intended to keep a woman from com- 
ing out of her stocking and devas- 
tating the country." 

— Ambrose Bierce 



"HUMAN SPEECH is like a cracked 
tin kettle on which we hammer out 
tunes to make bears dance, when we 
long to move the stars." 

— Flaubert 



"BARRIERS are for those who 
cannot fly." 

— Meredith 



"WOMAN: an enigma, which per- 
haps is no enigma except for those 
who seek some meaning in it." 

— Romain Rolland 



"LIFE is a pure flame, and we liv< 
by an invisible Sun within us." 

— Sir Thomas Browne 



'O wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



—BURNS 



POISONOUS PERSONALITIES FROM REAL LIFE 

Time: Mrs. Gossard's tea for the young ladies of the Senior 
Class. 

Place: Mrs. Gossard's dining room. 

Cause: Mrs, Gossard's cocoanut kisses going on their third 
round. 

Action: Excessive action by sixteen crunching pair of femi- 
nine senior jaws. 

Explosion: Said Mary Nelda, "I never had kisses that tasted 
so good as these." 

Said Benetta Eleanor, "and neither have I." 



Schelly would very much like to know whether Ash Wednes- 
day comes on Tuesday this year. All answers are to be address- 
ed to Suite Fourteen, North Hall. 



Eleanor Snoke believes that Scotchmen are not given credit 
for all their virtues. 



It's impossible to entertain after ten-thirty, even at Juniata 
College. Janet and Emma learned that by experience. 



During this cold weather the only folks who can visit the 
cemetery are those with fur coats* like Snoky's. 



Chubby Wilson and Red Barr aimed for West Hall but land- 
ed at Harrisburg — at any rate they were seen hopping from 
Harrisburg on Sunday morning. 

Public opinion does not credit them as having gone there 
to church. 



The Campus Worm hag recently received an answer to the 
question published in a previous issue concerning the identity 
of Homer and Veronica. The solution to the problem was ^re- 
sented by Mr. May hew during the course of one of his Table 
Talks, and is as follows." 

"Homer and Veronica are Dr. Reynolds'. Children." 



Mary prefers a rear pew and Zwally does not favor sitting 
iv up front so they compromise and always take a back seat; 
when they go to church. 



To the worm has come this choice morsel of a West Hall 
conversation: — 

"Red" Calabrese: All ministers sons are teetotalers. 
"Fritz" Miller: Then I suppose priest's sons are, too. 

Olive Weigel (to "Red") : Oh. Red ARE YOU A PRIEST'S 
SON? 

—THE CAMPUS WORM 



L. V. REPRESENTED 

AT GETTYSBURG 

(Continued from page 1) 



V How Can Western Civilization Con- 
tribute to the Bringing in of the 
Kingdom of God; and VI Translation 
of Internationalism into Campus and 
Individual Living. 

Some of the speakers were Dr. Ken- 
neth Latourette, Professor of Mis- 
sions Yale Divinity School, formerly 
a missionary in China; Dr. Edmund 
D. Soper, vice president of Duke 



University; Mr Treadwell Smith, ox 
Columbia University, formerly of the 
Near East; Mr. Arthur Moore Travel- 
ing Secretary of Student Division o'f 
Y. M. C. A.; Mr. W. J. Kitchen, ?i 
M. C. A. Secretary at State College; 
and Gladys Taylor ( Secretary of Na- 
tional Student Council of Y. W. C. A- 
"Christianity is an assurance ana 
an adventure: an assurance that at 
the heart of the world is an orde* 
and a ham ony most perfectly ex- 
pressed in the highest personality; an 
adventure to make love dominant t 11 
all relations." 

— Reinhold Niebur. 



G 

Th( 
do 
wei 
the 
to 1 
95 
tak 
yea 
the 
net, 
him 
turt 
T 
he ' 
con 
250 
nish 
rap] 
of J 
peo] 
of 
giat 



Ri 
lege 
con! 
New 
Atla 
lege 
; Pc 
edit< 
cula 
facu 
and 
forrr 

TI 
lowi 
Bucl 

Susq 

Stud 
The 



"I 
time 

In 
Gone 
Univ 
Dr. 
bee a 
book 
his 
made 
its gi 



'"A 
is of 
Saim; 
the ( 
of N« 
Harv 
grow 
that 
"Stuc 
ten c 
in a 1 
who 
are n 
has a 
While 
Asl, 
ftXerc 
Dr. C 
"Tl- 
Colleg 
sist u 
but a 
•dea, 
Vard 
Hieiv 
fequii 
•toea n 
on it. 
tne i < 
ance I 
Vale i 



Wh. 

Hays 

*eek, 
ai r . 

b all i 

kansp 

Alth.M 




LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH r, 1928 



PAGE THREE 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



BLONDS NOT PREFERRED 

GREENEVILLE, S. C. (CNA).- 
The gentlemen of Furman University 
do not prefer blonds. In fact, there 
were 155 who declared openly that 
they preferred those of a darker hue 
to the light headed ones while only 
95 let it be known that they would 
take a blonde "any old time in the 
year." These figures were secured by 
the advertising manager of The Hor- 
net, who lugged a sheet of paper with 
him for several days securing signa- 
tures. 

The sheet was a little longer than 
he was and when the siege was over 
contained the signatures of more than 
250 male students. The sheet fur- 
nished an interesting study in chiroc,- 
raphy and was displayed in the lobby 
of a local theatre, where the towns- 
people were enabled to get a glimpse 
of several hundred bona fide colle- 
giate autographs. 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



WE WERE ABSENT! 

Representatives from seven col- 
lege newspapers met for a sectional 
conference of the Intercollegiate 
Newspaper Association of the Middle 
Atlantic States, held at Juniata Col- 
lege. 

Policies of financial organization 
editorial problems, advertising ; cir- 
culation, selection of staff members, 
faculty censorship, cost of printing 
and others were discussed at the in- 
formal meeting. 

The representatives from the fol- 
lowing newspapers were present: The 
Bucknellian, the Dickinsonian The 
Susquehanna, Albright Bulletin, The 
Student Weekly, F. and M. College, 
The Juniatan, The Getysburgian. 



RETIREMENT 

"I am seventy years old and it is 
time to go on the shelf." 

In this manner Dr. Frank Johnson 
Goodnow, president of Johns Hopkins 
University, explained his resignation. 
Dr. Goodnow is distinguished not only 
because he is not going to write a 
book after retirement, but mainly for 
his scholastic devotion which has 
made Johns Hopkins outstanding for 
its graduate work. — (N. S) 



ATHEISM 

'"Atheism among college students 
is of no important consequence," Dr. 
Samuel Parkes Cadman, minister of 
the Central Congregational Church 
of New York, told a reporter for the 
Harvard Crimson. "As these students 
grow older they will come to realize 
that there is a God." he continued. 
"Students as well as other people of- 
ten confuse the term God. It takes 
in a broad sweep of meanings People 
Who call themselves atheists really 
are not atheists at all. Any one who 
has any ideals at all, which are worth 
while, could not be an atheist." 

Asked if he thought college chapel 
exercises should be made compulsory 
$>r. Cadman replied: 
H "They are no longer necessary in 
colleges. Many institutions still in- 
sist upon students attending chapel, 
but a great many have abolished the 
idea, and in a university like Har- 
vard it is, indeed justifiable. The 
ttiere fact, however, that there is no 
Required chapel attendance does not 
ftiean that one must turn his back up- 
on it. President Angell, of Yale, told 
toe recently that voluntary attend 
*nce had proved more satisfactory at 
Yale than the old system." 



TEAM GOES BY AIR 

When the basketball team of the 
University of Wichita went to play 
Hays State Teachers' College last 
^eek, the team was transported by 
*ir. This is the first time a basket- 
ball team has used this method of 
transportation as far as is known, 
^though Hays is less than 200 miles 



KALOZETEANS PUT 

ON TWO PROGRAMS 



During the last two weeks, Kalo 
presented two programs which were 
very appropriate and well prepared. 
The subject for Friday, February 17, 
was February in History. It was as 
follows: 

Saint Valentine, Trezise; Historical 
Events of February Becker; Lincoln, 
Grant Miller; Current Events, Kra- 
lich; Piano Solo, Mentzer; Editor Ex- 
aminer, Hazelton. 

On Friday, February 24 the 
speakers were restricted to the mat- 
ter of schools, the following program 
being rendered: 

Catawba, Kauffman; Millersville, 
Salada; Schools of New Jersey, Tetter; 
Piano Solo ; Noll; Temple, Allwein; 
Editor-Examiner, Hazelton. 



away ? the train connections are so 
bad that it is a two-day trip to go 
there from Wichita. Consequents 
a squadron of five airplanes was as- 
sembled to transport the cagers. Thev 
made the trip by air in about four 
hours. 



FLORIDA GRANDMA 

ATTENDS COLLEGE 

Mrs. Nannie Parrott, a 70-year-old 
mother, grandmother and a great- 
grandmother, has matriculated in the 
University of Florida extension ser- 
vice and in two more years will a- 
achieve the ambition of her life— r 
college degree. 

After she was graduated from high 
school 50 years ago, she taught in 
schools in Missisippi, Texas, Okla- 
homa and Florida. 

"I have been going to school all 
my life and I won't stop until I die, 
if I can help it," Mrs. Parrott says 
"After I am graduated from the uni- 
versity, I'll study something else. 1 
am going to learn something new 
every day I live." 



OLDEST COLLEGE 

GRADUATE DIBS 

Dr. Samuel Williams, A. B. LL. D., 
100 years old, said to be the nation's 
oldest college graduate, the oldest 
wearer of the Phi Beta Kappa key 
and the oldest alumuns of Ohio Wes- 
leyan university, relinquished hi; 
titles today. 

With his passing the silver handled 
cane which he carried as the oldest 
living graduate of Ohio Wesleyan 
university passes to Colonel Edwin 
Augustus Parrott, of Princeton, N. J. 
who was graduated in the class of 
1849, one year after Dr Williams. 



CONSOLATION 
You Students who flunked out this 
semester will be comforted to know- 
that the University of Washington 
dropped 491 students who failed in 
their scholastic work. 



NEVER GIVE UP 

Dr. Richardson of Youngstown, 
Ohio, Superintendent of Public In- 
struction says, "Decide on your life 
work and then stick to it through 
thick and thin." This applies to 
people in Pennsylvania also. 



HAIRCUT PROVES COSTLY 

Violating an honor pledge, upper 
classmen of Louisiana State Univer- 
sity clipped the hair on 300 fresh- 
men heads. As a consequence ) three 
varsity football players and five oth- 
er students have been dismissed. 
President T. W. Alkinson is trying 
to identify the other clippers and 
they too will find themselves out of 
the University.— The Gettysburgian. 



CLIOS PRESENT 

"CANDIED SWEETS" 

Clio held its regular weekly meet- 
ing Friday ; February 24. After a 
short business meeting an excellent 
program under the caption of "Can- 
died Sweets" was given. The first 
number was a skit called "Emma and 
Papa". This was carried out by 
Emma Shaeffer and Mary Clymer. 
The atmosphere was then changed 
and in the skit "Marshmallows", 
Emma Meyer and Anna Mark took 
the Clionians for a visit to the "lum- 
ber yard". This was followed by ? 
charming duet, "A Kiss in the Dark", 
given by Nelda Spatz and Irene Peter. 
"Love Nest" was a short sketch on 
married life. This was followed bv 
"After Dinner Mints" by the Critic. 



TOO MUCH FOR L. V. 

Smoking and drinking are not so 
bad except when done in an effort to 
"be smart". 

"Petting" is necessary if a girl 
wishes to date the same fellow again. 

The single standard of morals, if 
it ever materializes, will be far in 
the future > because men will either 
have to raise to the standards of 
women or women sink to the stand- 
ards of men. 

So say co-eds at the University of 
Iowa. 



THE SAME EVERY WHERE 

The following was clipped from 
"The Gettysburgian". "The members 
of the College Glee Club must have 
had some pretty "hot times" on their 
recent trip, for when two or more of 
the men enter into a conversation we 
hear all about "Night Clubs", "Coney 
Island" and other foreign terms." The 
only difference is that Gettysburg- 
was in New York while Lebanon Val- 
ley was at Pine Grove. 



GLEE CLUB RETURNS 

FROM INITIAL TRT] 

(Continued from page 1) 



ford succeeded in reaching Millers- 
burg on Saturday evening after the 
concert, in time to make connections 
for Philadelphia where he kept a 
Sunday appointment. Behney filled 
the pulpit in the United Brethren 
church on Sunday morning, while the 
club supplied tne place of the choir. 
On Sunday afternoon Klinger led tnt 
club in a futile attempt to reach 
Annville in time for Monday's classes. 

Monday was a day of rest, and 
everyone took advantage of the re 
spite to move on to Tower City. It 
was necessary to procure hotel ac- 
comodations there for the night, and 
a convenient radio furnished enter 
tainment. During the course of the 
following day, both Prof. Crawford 
and Rearick rejoined the club after 
enjoyable week-end trips. The Tower 
City program was given in the Wag- 
ner Opera House on Tuesday evening 
to a large crowd which included 
"Red" Keiser. 

Wednesday was moving day again, 
and Pine Grove was the destination. 
Before the largest and most appre- 
ciative crowd encountered on the 
trip the club presented its best con- 
cert in the Pine Grove Armory. 

In Valley View the finale of the 
trip was put on before a large audi- 
ence, and it was with genuine regret 
that the club brought its concert to 
a close. 

No convenient Y." M. C. A. cafe- 
teria furnished a means of obtaining 
cheap meals this year, but even Beh- 
ney complained of being over-fed by 
the well-meaning entertainers, so that 
there was really no necessity for 
hunting an outside hash house. 



EXTEMPORANEOUS 

PROGRAM AT PHILO 



The members of Philo presented 
an extemporaneous program at the 
regular session of the society on Fri- 
day evening ( February 24, and the 
subjects discussed provided a wealth 
of new and heretofore unheard of in- 
formation for the listening crowd. 
Zwally started things by explanin^ 
that always "It's the Little Things 
that Count", while Rank attempted 
to settle the burning question, "Why 
Doesn't Grss Grow on a Door-Knob? 
Barr very ably brought out the many 
sides of the problem, "Why Does a 
Hen Cackle while a Rooster Crows?" 
and Slenker rhetorically discussed 
"The Advisability of Barring Preach- 
ers from L. V. C", "Our Glee Club 
Trip and its Success", was told Dy 
Beattie just before Klinger began 
wondering "Why Blackberries are 
Red when they are Green." The social 
problem was left to Barnhart,- who 
tried to discover "Where Robinson 
Crusoe went with Friday on Satur- 
day night." No definite decision 
was reached on many of these ques- 
tions and they have been left open 
for future debate. 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



READERS' CLUB 

MEETS FEB. 16 



The Reader's Club met at the home 
of Dr. and Mrs. Paul Wallace, Feb- 
ruary 16, for a discussion of Upton 
Sinclair, including his latest novel 
"Oil" which has taken the world by 
storm. The program was opened by 
Allison Mayhew and Wm. Tetter, who 
reported on Sinclair's earlier book 
"Money Writer",. Their opinions 
and ideas were well received by the 
other members of the club. Mae 
Hamer reported on the "Goose Step' 
This book is said to tell a great part 
of the life of Upon Sinclair. The 
final member was a report upon "Oil" 
by Mike Kiehner. All the members of 
of the club then entered into a pro- 
longed discussion of Sinclair, his life 
and ideas, after which the meeting 
was adjourned. The progrsm for the 
next meeting will be a discussion of 
J. M. Barrie. 



SENIOR GIRLS EN- 
TERTAINED AT TEA 

(Continued from page 1) 



ed. Tea was poured by Madeline 
Rife and Mary McCurdy, alos mem- 
bers of the sophomore clas>. 

This is the first of four teas which 
Mrs. Gossard gives every year to the 
girls of each class. At these parties 
it is the custom for the clnss cousins 
to furnish tne program. There is no 
doubt that these eas are greatly en- 
joyed and that the girls appreciate 
Mrs. Gossard'!- kindness. 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville _ _ _ _ _ Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

KODAKS & SUPPLIES, FILMS. 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING-- 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Printing — Publishing 
Advertising 
Annville Penna. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 



THE HUB 



713 Cumberland Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 
QCive Forever 

36 North Eighth Street, 



Photographs of Quality 

BLAZIER & MILLER 

LEBANON. TA. 



PAG® FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH i, 1928 



Y.W.-Y.M.C.A. Notes 



On Monday night, February 6, a 
very important Alumni Executive 
Committee meeting was held. One oC 
the items discussed was concerning 
plans for an Alumni Day in connec- 
tion with the Annual Commencement. 
Those present were: Reverend P. B. 
Gibble of Palmyra President; Mrs. 
Lillie K. Shroyer, Vice President; 
Professor C. G. Dotter, Treasurer; 
Mr. Boaz Light, Miss Anna Kreider, 
and Miss Esther Walmer, Secretary. 



Isaac Whitman Huntzberger ; form- 
erly of Elizabeth town, Pa., recently 
passed away. He received his A. P». 
degreee in 1899, and an M. A. in 1902. 
He had lately been a resident of 
Washington, D. C. 



B. B. QUINTET DROPS 

ONE— WINS THREE 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Lawson and Piela starred for the' 
respective teams. 
The score: — 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G F P 

Gelbert f 113 

Piela f 6 5 1 

Wheeler c 2 2 i 

Miller c 1 1 

Albright g Oil 

Piersol g 10 2 

Total 10 10 30 

MUHLENBERG 

G F P 

Lawson f 6 6 IS 

Von Nortwick f 4 19 

Smith c 3 17 

Kieffer c 

Heffner c 

Dickert g C 

Chapman g 11 

Borrelli g 1 2 4 

Total 14 11 39 

Referree — Wright. 



Annville j February 23: — 

In the fastest home game of the 
season, Lebanon Valley defeated Ur- 
sinus here to-night 45-31. Both teams 
exhibited an excellent passing game, 
with Lebanon Valley having the bet- 
ter of the shooting end. 

Albright played a brilliant floor 
game for Lebanon Valley and his 
shooting in the second half was 
deadly. Gelbert co-starred on the 
offensive . with Albright. Captain 
Piersol's work at guard was of un- 
questioned aid in keeping down the 
outstanding performers for Urisinus. 
Lebanon Valley's team work was the 
best shown this season. 

The Score:— 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G F P 

Gelbert f 6 5 17 

Piela f 1 2 3 7 

Shroyer f 

Wheeler c 2 15 

Miller c 2 2 

Albright g 6 2 14 

Bell g 

Piersol g 

Total 16 13 45 

URISINUS 

G F P 

Bigley f 2 2 

Hoagey f 2 15 

Stine f 10 2 

Young c 3 6 

Shink c 10 2 

Moyer g 3 3 

Weidensal g 11 

Newcomer g 5 10 

Peters g 

Francis g 



LOCAL CO-EDS 

WIN AND LOSE 

(Continued from page 1) 



RECITAL IS GIVEN 

AT LOCAL CHURCH 

(Continued from page 1) 



Annville, February 18: — 

Lebanon Valley had little trouble 
defeating Schuylkill College to-night 
51-35. Coach Mylin started his sec- 
ond team. Schuylkill proceded to piie 
up a commanding lead and late in 
the first half Mylin sent in his first 
stringers, who cut the Reading boys 
lead to five points. Schuylkill led 
half time 25-20. 

In the second half Schuylkill rarely 
had their hands on the ball: Roth 
and Norris accounted for Schuylkill's 
two lone field goals, while Lebanon 
Valley, with Piela leading the offen- 
sive, tallied thirteen. Combining a 
brilliant passing game with deadly 
shooting, the local boys amassed a 
tt>tal of 31 points to Schuylkills 10, 
to win 51-35. 

The Schuylkill score: — 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G F P 

Laurie f 

Piela f 9 5 23 

Brubaker f 

Gelbert f 4 8 

Miller c 2 4 

Wheeler c 12 4 

Bell g 10 2 

Albright g 2 2b 

Piersol g 2 4 

Total 21 9 5' 

SCHUYLKILL 

G F P 

Yetzer f 2 6 10 

Roth f 12 4 

Barkman f 4 8 

Stauffer c 4 19 

Purniell g 

Ford g 10 2 

Morris g 

Zartman g 

Oyster g 2 2 

Total 12 11 35 ' 



ing players. The score at half time 
was 21-3. 
The score: — 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G F P 

Meyer f 8 11 27 

Rose f 1 2 4 

Lane f 4 2 10 

Keener f 10 2 

March c 

Engle c 

J. Miller c 

Freeman c D 

Showers sc 

I. Miller sc 

Cochran g 

Horst g 

Gorski g 

Mark g 

Total 14 15 43 

SCHUYLKILL 

G F P 

Gruenberg f 2 2 

Lomneth f 10 2 

Strauss f 2 2 

Heere c 

Levan sc ._ 

Eisenbise sc 

Mosser g 

Fridinger g ...^ 

Eschleman g 

Moyer g 



Total 



12 7 31 



Lancaster, February 24: — 

Lebanon Valley had a hard time 
whipping Franklin and Marshall to- 
night 30-29. Trailing at half time 
14-7, F & M started the second half 
as they started the first. With 10 
minutes to go the score stood 23-9 
favor L. V. Franklin and Marshall 
then started the greatest scoring 
streak ever seen in the local gym. 
Brown and McCune located the bas 
ket, and in the last 10 minutes F. & 
M. scored 20 points to Lebanon Val- 
ley's 7. With 30 seconds to go the 
score stood 30-29. Lebanon Valley 
committed a technical foul. Brown 
missed the foul try as the gun ended 
the game. Piela and Gelbert starred 
for Lebanon Valley. Brown played 
sensational ball for F. & M. 

The F. & M. Score:— 

LEBANON * ALLEY 

G F P 

Gelbert f 3 2 8 

Piela f 6 4 16 

Wheeler c 

Miller c 2 4 

Albright g 2 2 

Piersol g 

Total 11 8 30 

F. & M. 

G F P 

Bowman f 

Pupp f 10 2 

Kulp f - 113 

Kahn f & g 12 4 

McCune c 2 15 

Cole g 2 1 6 

Brown g 4 2 10 

Total 11 7 29 

Referee — Boyer. 



HAVE YOU 
ORDERED YOUR 
"QUITIE" ? 

See Wayne Sparrow 
or 

Archie Lutz 
at once 



cal organization of the city. 

After a year's study in Berlin he 
was appointed organist of the Trinity 
Methodist churchy Denver. Wilber- 
force Whiteman, father of the famous 
Paul was conductor of the choir 
which numbered 100 members. Paul 
was then a boy in the teens and a 
member of the class in harmony 
taught by Mr. McCarrell. 

Elsa Meiskey is recognized as one 
of the Pennsylvania singers who is 
rapidly ascending the ladder of fame. 
She is at present under the tutelage 
of Madame Sembrich and Richard 
Hageman, conductor and composer. 

Elsa Meiskey is a member of the 
Philadelphia Civic Opera Company 
and has sung for the Philadelphia 
orchestra and Philadelphia Choral 
Society and in March will sing a re- 
cital in Town Hall, New York City. 



Total __ 
Referee- 



1 4 



Moyer. 



Huntington, February 25:- - 

Lebanon Valley Co-eds lasted their 
second defeat of the season, from 
Juniata's Six here to-night 33-21. The 
Blue , and White team undoubtedly 
missed the services of Miss Lane. Her 
absence broke up the combination 
that has functioned so well all sea- 
son. 

Juniata however deserves much 
credit for winning the game for they 
played a fine passing game and the 
shooting of Musselman and Evans 
was wonderful. 

Emma Meyers was the outstanding 
star of the game with 21 points. 

The score: — 

LEBANON VALLEY 

• G F P 

Meyer f 7 7 2! 

I. Miller f 

J. Miller c 0' 

Freeman sc 

Fischer sc 

Cochran g 

Gorski g 

Total 7 7 21 

JUNIATA 

G F i 

Musselman f 7* 3 17 

Evans f 7 2 k 

Laing c 

Garner sc 

Neff g 

Free g 

Grove g 

Total 14 5 33 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



JUNIOR TEA GIVEN 

THIS AFTERNOON 



The second of Mrs. Gossard's teas 
for the girls of the four classes iv. 
being held this afternoon at the new- 
ly remodeled Gossard home. The 
Junior girls are guests this afternoon 
with the Freshmen girls presenting 
the entertainment. 

The program is to consist of vocal 
and instrumental numbers, besides 
several readings. 



SERIES OF B. B. 

GAMES PLANNED 



Plans are now under way for the 
annual inter-class Basketball games, 
for the Soph-Frosh "epic", and final- 
ly (it is rumored) for a Faculty-Sen- 
ior game. This last is a reminder of 
the famous base-ball game of last 
spring, when the seniors and the fac- 
ultywaged war to the death. These 
games ore to be held in the near 
future. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumljr and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 

Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 
UNION EMBLEM CO palmyra, pa. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS— TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY 



STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 



THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



DEE 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE. PA. 



LEST WE 
FORGET—OUR 
DEBATERS 




SUPPORT 
THE STUDENT 
RECITALS 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 192*8 



NUMBER 1 



FORMAL RE-OPENING 
PROGRAM IS GIVEN 

Engle Conservatory Re-Dedi- 
cated As Enck And Funck 
Make Addresses 



This morning one of the important 
events of the year took place in the 
formal re-opening and dedication of 
of the Engle Conservatory of Music, 
which has undergone a renovation 
since last year. 

The formal re-Opening program 
was held at ten o'clock in the college 
chapel, which is part of the Conser- 
vatory building. There were two 
main addresses one by Dr. S. C. 
Enck of Harrisburg and the other by 
Dr. Charles E. Fultz of Washington, 
D. C. 

Dr. Enck, the superintendent of 
East Penn conference of the United 
Brethren Church, in his address 
traced the history of our college frci.o 
the days of its struggling infancy 
until it has become known through- 
out the east and recognized r 
the colleges of the highest standing. 
Dr. Enck presented these high-lights 
of our history in a most interesting 
fashion, and the little personal side- 
continued on Page 2.) 



DEBATERS WIN 

DOUBLE VICTORY 

Girls' Teams Beat Schuylkill In 
Both Debates, To Open 
Season 



The girls' debating team got off to 
a good start last Tuesday, winning 
their first debate, a decisive victory 
on both the negative and affirmative 
sides. The debate was with Schuyl- 
kill and was held both at Reading 
and Annville. The affirmative side 
Was up held by Leah Harpel, captain; 
Miriam Muth, first speaker; and Janet 
Miller alternate. The negative side 
was ably upheld by Mary Ax, captain; 
Ruth Liller, first speaker; Dorothy 
Heister, second speaker; and Emme- 
line Shaffer, alternate. At both 
schools there was a fair audience to 
hear the debates. There were three 
judges at both schools, the points be- 
ing decided as follows: at Reading, 
Lebanon Valley 2, Schuylkill 1; at 
Annville, Lebanon Valley 3, Schuyl- 
kill 

0. This was Lebanon Valley's 
first debate and Schuylkill's fourth, 
80 the outlook for this year's team 
* surely bright. 



t V. GLEE CLUB AP- 
PEARS IN PALMYRA 



On "Thursday evening, March 2, 
^e Glee Club gave another superb 
c °ncert at Palmyra. This, the fifth 
^°ncert of the season, "went over" 
lfl fine style, and many favorable 
j-°niments were heard from folks who 
**Ve heard the Glee Club for years, 
"he Club this year is especially good 
' n chorus work, Professor Crawford 
e iig present at each concert to per- 
8 °nally direct. Next week the club 
^11 make its annual trip through 
^Uthern Pennsylvania, Maryland, 
Washington. 
The trip will last about a week, 



MRS. O. E. REYNOLDS 

SPEAKS TO LADIES 

Mrs. O. E. Reynolds, formerly 
head of the department of Home 
Economics at the College at Puget 
Sound, Tacoma, Washington, spoke 
at the meeting of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of Lebanon Valley College, 
held in the North Hall parlors on 
Thursday afternoon. She spoke very 
interestingly on the subject of our 
present day diet Mrs. Reynolds is 
the wife bf Dr. Reynolds, head of 
the educational repartmene of Leba- 
non Valley College. 

The business meeting preceded 
the address of the afternoon. Close 
to forty ladies attended. Tea and 
light refreshments were served. 



RELATIONS WITH 
ALBRIGHT BROKEN 

Break Follows Dispute Over 
Eligibility, After Four 
Years of "Classics" 



After four years of renewed com- 
petition following a twelve-year "va- 
cation", Albright and Lebanon Val- 
ley Colleges have, again severed ath- 
letic relationship. During the past 
four years, the Blue and White rep- 
resentatives have taken three out of 
the four gridiron classics, being fore 
ed to accept a 6-6 tie in the last, due 
to a series of misfortunes. The Mylin- 
men have copped four basket ball 
games, the Red and White taking 
two. Albright was more successful 
in baseball taking all of the three 
games. 

In most bf the newspaper accounts 
of the break, coach Mylin was direct- 
ly charged with the responsibility. 
(Continued on page 3) 



FIRST OF SEASON'S 
RECITALS IS GIVEN 

Both Advanced And Beginning 
Pupils Appear In This 
Year's Opener 



6 club leaving on Thursday. 



The first of a series of Students' 
Recitals given by the students of the 
Conservatory of Music was held in 
Engle Hall, Monday, March 5. Due 
to the fact that the chapel was being 
remodeled and that the pipe organ 
was being repaired, it was impossible 
to hold r.ny recitals before this date. 

The program consisted of piano, 
organ and voice numbers. The fol- 
lowing program was rendered: 

A short story, Virgil, Helen Kreid- 
er; Valse Petite, Virgil, Helen Butter- 
wick; March in D, Bach, June Ging- 
rich; Sketch, Adams, Anna Butter- 
wick; Carissima, Penn, Merle Becker; 
Londonderry Air, arr. by Coleman, 
Violet Walter; Chromatic Valse, God- 
ard; Anna Mumma; Haiden Roselein, 
Schubert, Lied der Mignon, Schubert 
Alcesta Slichter; Vision, Rheinberger, 
Olive Weigel; Valcih, Mokrejs, Dor- 
othy Holdeman; Porate dormite, Bas- 
sani, Ouvre Tes Yeux Bleus, Massenet 
Ah Love But a Day, Gilberte, An 
Evening Song, Gilberte, Mary Nelda 
Spatz; A Woodland Idyl, Reiff, Ruth 
Strubhar; Dormi, belle, dormi tu 
Bassani, Per la gloria d'adorarvi, 
Bonconini, The Rose Enslaves the 
(Continued on Page 2) 



LOCAL CAGERS WIN 
TWO ANDUBE TWO 

Lose To G'burg And Ursinus! 
But Win From F. & M. 
And Drexel 



Annville, Feb. 28 — 

Gettysburg brought a strong team 
here tonight and defeated the Leb- 
anon Valley five 42-41. The Gettys- 
burg aggregation proved the smooth- 
est passing organization that has vis- 
ited the local gym this season. 

There was much scoring during the 
game, thirty-five field goals being 
registered. First one team and then 
the other would take the lead. This 
kept the spectators continually "on 
the edges of their seats". The fact 
that nearly every man broke into 
the scoring, removed all traces of 
stardom from the game and made it 
a complete team affair. Gelbert 
played his last game for the Blue and 
White. 

(Continued on page 4.) 



"CHARLIE" JOINS 
ST. LOUIS CARDS. 

Local Athlete Takes! Up Chance 
At Career In Pro- 
fessional Ball 



Within the past two weeks "Charlie" 
Gelbert, the greatest known all-around 
athlete ever to attend Lebanon Val- 
ley left his scholastic duties to join 
the St. Louis Cardinals baseball squad 
in its spring training camp at Avon 
Park, Florida. Gelbert would have 
been awarded his diploma with the 
class of 1928 if he had chosen to stay 
in school, but the call of organized 
baseball sent him on his way south- 
ward. 

For three and a half years, Gelbert 
was the backbone of Lebanon Valley's 
athletic team. His football ability and 
strategy led to his selection as cap- 
tain of the team during the past sea- 
son. He was a leading figure in 
every one of the Blue and White's 
triumphant marches to victory in 
which he eplayed a part. 

His last appearance before a Leb- 
anon Valley crowd was made during 
the basketball game against Gettys- 
burg, when he was accorded the best 
ovation a home crowd could give its 
favorite son. 

(Continued on page 3) 



CO-EDS WIN FROM 
WESTERN MARYLAND 

W. Md. Defeated Second Time 
After Fast and Hotly 
Contested Game 



Annville, March 10 — 

Lebanon Valley's Co-eds defeated 
the strong Western Maryland Sex- 
tette for the second time this season 
25-20. The game was fast and hotly 
contested throughout. Close guard- 
ing featured the game, especially the 
work of the Lebanon Valley pair, 
Misses Gorski and Cochran. 

Due to the fine playing of Murphy, 
Western Maryland led at half-time 
12-10. Early in the seebnd half a 
field goal by Meyer of Lebanon Val- 
ley tied the score. Lane followed 
(Continued on page 3) 



L. V. PROF. ATTENDS 

N. E. A. CONVENTION 



Dr. 0. Edgar Reynolds, professor 
of Education and Psychology, attend- 
ed the Annual Spring Session of 
the National Educational Associa- 
tion in Boston during the week of 
Feb. 26 to Mar 3. 

Ten thousand school people from 
all parts of the United States attend- 
ed the convention. The convention 
was divided into general and section- 
al meetings. Prof. Reynolds was es- 
pecially interested in the sectional 
meetings of the professors of Educa- 
tion and Psychology from the differ- 
ent colleges. Leading men in Educa- 
tion and Psychology were the speak- 
ers. Meetings were held at Harvard 
University. Prof. Reynolds attended 
the convention for three days. 



DELPHIANS' SIXTH 
PROVES SUCCESS 



Girls Present Sir James Barrie's 
"Quality Street" In Ex- 
cellent Program 



JUNIORS 
NEV 



"YOU 
ER CAN TELL" 



GIVE 



On Saturday evening, March 3, 
Delphian Literary celebrated, with 
splendid success, her Sixth Anniver- 
sary. Many bf her alumni returned, 
so thajt ;the entJilr'e weekend was a 
busy one. 

Miss Olive Weigel opened the first 
part of the program with two splen- 
did piano numbers, "To a Waterlily" 
and "Witches Dance" by McDowell. 
Mrs. Anna Long Dazell, class of '22, 
delivered the invocation. The Presi- 
dent's address by Sara Lou Rose Off- 
ered welcome to all, after which 
Harry Krill's Accordian Orchestra en- 
tertained until the stage was reset 
(Continued on page 3) 



Y. W. ELECTS NEXT 
YEAR'S OFFICERS 

Emma Shaeffer Eelected Presi- 
dent For Coming Year — 
Succeeding Snoke 



An association meeting of the Y. 
W. C. A. was held on Monday, March 
5 at 4 o'clock in North Hall Parlor. 
The President, Miss Eleanor Snoke, 
presided and at that time she gave her 
annual report. Reports were also 
given by the following cabinet mem- 
bers: 

Vice Pres., Alice Kindt; Correspond- 
ing Sec, Mabel Brewbaker; Recording 
Emma Shaeffer; Chairman of Music 
Committee, Mildred Umholtz; Chair- 
man of World Fellowship Committee, 
Ruth Strubhar; Chairman of Discus- 
sion Group, Madeline Rife; Chairman 
of Freshman Commission, Ruth. Coop- 
er. 

After the various reports the gir's 
elected the following officers for the 
year 1928-1929. 

President, Emma Shaeffer; Vice 
President, Mildred Umholtz; Corres- 
ponding Secretary, Katherine Bork: 
Recording Secretary, Hazel Bailey; 
Treasurer, Jane Fearnow; Pianist. 
Olive Weigel. 

All the girls of the old cabinet 
have enjoyed their work and wish 
the new cabinet and the new presi- 
dent a very successful year. 



Annual Third Year Presenta- 
tion Coached By Dr. Wallace 
Proves A Big Hit 

Last night the Junior Class pre- 
sented one bf the best play hits of 
the season, giving Bernard Shaw's re 
cent play, "You Never Can Tell". 
This play comanded the largest sale 
of reserved seat tickets of any enter- 
tainment so far during the year. 

The play itself was a four act 
comedy. The play begah with a fam- 
ily that had been separated through 
marriage difficulty. There were 
three small children. The wife, an 
authoress, (Mrs. Hammond), with her 
children, went to Madeira where they 
lived. After eighteen years they came 
back to England on a visit The old- 
est daughter Gloria, (Leah Harpel) 
was then marriageable and beautiful. 
She coldly refused to marry the First 
Officer of the ship, an incident which 
led to the question of who her father 
was, but to no satisfaction. In Eng- 
land a dentist called Dr. Valenti te 
(Beattie) fell in love with Gloria. 
The landlord of the dentist was in- 
(Continued on page 



SOPH GIRLS ARE 

GUESTS AT TEA 

Mrs. Gossard Again Hostess As 
Senior Girls Provide 
The Program 



The girl's of the Sophomore Class 
were entertained at a tea Friday, 
afternoon, March 9, at the home of 
Mrs. G. D. Gossard, wife of the Presi- 
dent. 

The program was furnished by 
members of the Senior Class. Grace 
Daniel opened the program with a 
piano solo, "By the Brookside" 
Frances Long and Jerry Hafer, a 
Roumanian couple danced and sang. 
They were accompanied on the piano 
by Grace Daniel. Anna Mark gave a 
very clever original reading, entitled 
"Burned Snits and Scorched Sauer- 
krout" which yas filled with her wit 
and humor. "Among my Souvenirs" 
was sung by Frances Long and Elea- 
nor Snoke, again accompanied by 
Grace Daniel. The final number Was 
the Alma Mater by the Sophomore 
girls. Delightful refreshments were 
then served. Tea was poured by 
Eleanor Snoke and Frances Long. 

Everyone had an enjoyable time 
and all the girls appreciated Mrs. 
Gossard's kindness in having these 
teas. 



SENIORS MEASURED 

FOR CAPS— GOWNS 

The Seniors were measured last 
week for their gowns for graduation. 
A meeting was held in room 18 Of the 
Administration Building, in which all 
the Seniors were measfred for their 
gowns and caps. There seems to 
have been some trouble to get head- 
sizes to fit, for the AA's were too 
small and the A's tob large. The 
Senior class must have unusual heads. 
The members of the committee to 
measure the students and get the 
gowns vvere Eleanor Snoke, Elsie 
Rieder and Bruce Behney. The gowns 
are rented from a firm in Chicago at 
$2.50 a piece. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1928 



latie€olkjiennt 

PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
rU COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chiei 
H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 
Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

Conservator MARY L. HARTZ, '30 

Athletics G - CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '28 

Clio MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

DelpWa'n""™"™" ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Kalo __ MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

phllo JOHN W. BEATTIE, '29 

General 1" 1" JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '2S 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



T 



EDITORIALS 



BOYS TAKE NOTE! 

The boys have another reason for being proud- of* the CorEds. 
They won a double victory from the Schuylkill debaters; but 
there were more speakers on both teams than there weft stud- 
ents in the audience— almost ! If the girls don't support the 
boys' games they have no school spirit. How about the boysi 
supporting the girls — once ? 



"It Is Written-" 



"There is no past, so long as books 
shall live!" 

— Bulwer-Lytlon 

"A good book is the precious life- 
blood of a master spirit, embalmed 
and treasured up on purpose to a 
life beyond life." 

— Milton 



"Medicine for the Soul." 

it —Inscription over the door 
of the Library at Thebes 

"The debt which he owes to them 

is incalculable Time glides on; 

fortune is inconstant; tempers are 
soured; bonds which seem indissolu- 
ble are daily sundered by interest, by 
emulation, or by caprice. But no 
such cause can affect the silent con- 
verse which we hold with the high- 
est of human intellects." 

— Macaulay 



"In books lies the soul of the whole 
Past Time: the articulate audible 
voice of the Past* when the body and 
material substance of it has altoget- 
her vanished like a dream." 

— Carlyle 



THIS IS THE TIME ! 

The campus is a busy "Microcosm" these days. Debates, 
recitals, plays, anniversaries, games, concerts, exam* sounds like 
a catalog! We ARE pretty busy, aren't we? 



GOOD-BYE "ALBRIGHT GAMES"! 

Another coluimn of this issue gives an account, of the sever-, 
ing of relations with Albright College. (Deep sigh.) There 
may be no real consolation in saying, "Gosh, it was great while 
it lasted", but it is hard to forget the "white-washing" trips to 
Lebanon, the weeks of preparation and anticipation, or the 
games themselves and the excitement that followed. "The glory 
that was Greece, the grandeur that was Rome — they are but 
dust!" 



"Some books are to be tasted, 
others to be swallowed, and some 
few to be chewed and digested: that 
is, some books are to be read only in 
part, others to be read, but not curi- 
ously and some few to be read wholly, 
and with diligence and attention." 

— Bacon 



$ 4 ' '# 




'O wad some Pow'r the giftie &e us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



-BURNS 



Spring is here! If you don't believe it look at the muddy 
heels of the co-eds, and the holes in the campus sod between 
North Hall and the Ad building. 



Naturally the said spring weather makes Cupid's neophytes 
as one would say— regret that more than half their class cuts 
have been consumed. This is the time of year when that pro- 
fessor is most popular who doesn't count cuts. 



"Not a heart burn in a million chews" — College food. 

Barney ("Whale") Barnhart attended a sopority dance at 
Elizabethtown College last Saturday. 



The worm thought this was a good one: — 

Burglar: — Hand over your money or I'll blow out your brains 1 

And the college boy laughed and laughed. 



"Beware of a man of one book." 

— Ancient Proverb 



THE MIDNIGHT HOUR 

Midnight sessions are among the most enjoyable experiences in college 
life. No class room discussion can possibly take the place of the friendly, 
rambling, soul-revealing sort of argument that mtost of us carry in our 
memories as the choicest part our undergraduate days. Count not that 
time lost, which is stolen from studies and dull, profitable education to drag 
discussions through interminable windings while the room is filled with the 
atmosphere of philosophy and tobacco smoke, and the hands of the alarm 
clock which is to ring at seven, slowly move around to four o'clock in the 

. . !.-,. T, f ,,vj >.,or, t . T '< w< f vir, vim r.Y srfi t<v snitown rtoUfltoos** 
morning. 

That is the time when friendship is tempered and tested, when toler- 
ation and fairmindedness are taxed to the limit, when Utopian schemes are 
advanced to reform religion, college politics, or the social system. That 
is the time when generous or impracticable impulses have full sway, when 
man meets man without the deceiving mask of manner and custom, on a 
basis of complete acceptance and equality. That is the time when a man 
forgets that he has always considered it immodest to expose his own feel- 
ings and beliefs, and when he speaks the thoughts that are in his mind 
with full assurance of understanding. That is the time when friends are 
made whom we mean to keep through life. 

Finally, the conversation lags and dulls, and the host shows by nods 
and yawns that he is sleepy, and he ;opens the door to say "Good night" 
with a lack of politeness that at any other time would surely arouse re- 
sentment One then takes his feet off the furniture and dumps the ashes 
from his pipe on the floor, departing to leave the cool night wind to blow 
away the tobacco smoke, and the host to snatch a few hours sleep before 
daylight. 

The midnight hour is the supposed mythical education that one gets 
from heart-to-heart contact with his fellows. It is the course in human 
psychology that is not based on scientific laws nor book theorems; it is 
the period of broadening one's mind, intellect, and most of all, sympathy. 
If there is one thing in a college education that the commuter misses, it is 
that learning acquired from midnight hours of discussion, confiding, and 
confession. It is that hour of life with one's associates that should make 
the parent and the students themselves realize what they are losing by 
living at home away from the atmosphere and contact of the human feel- 
ing of the College. 

— Columbia Spectator 



"Books are the true levellers. They 
give to all who faithfully use them 
the society, the spiritual presence, of 
the best and greatest of our race." 

— W. E. Channing 



"Except a living man, there is 
nothing more wonderful than a book." 

— Charles Kingsley 



"As good almost kill a man as kill 
a good book: who kills a man kills 
a reasonable creature, God's image, 
but he who destroys a good book 
kills reason itself." 

— John Milton 



"The foolishest book is a kind of 
leaky boat on a sea of wisdom: some 
of the wisdom will get in anyhow." 

— Holmes 



"My library was dukedom large 
enough." 

— Shakespeare 



"Books, like proverbs, receive their 
chief value from the stamp and es- 
teem of the ages through which they 
have passed." 

—Sir Wm. Temple 



"Some books are drenched sands, 
On which a greaet soul's wealth 
lies all in heaps. 
Like a wrecked argosy." 

— Alexander Smith 



"Laws die, Books never." 

— Bulwer-Lytton 



"There is no book so bad, said the 
bachelor,"but something good may be 
found in it." 



The worm has just finished looking over some old "Bizarres". 
Wow ! What they laughed at in the "good old days"! 

Item: — 

Miss Johnson: — "Who was the hero of 'Paradise Lost'?" 
Boaz Light '13: — "Either Adam or Eve. I'm not sure which!" 
Item: — 

Prof. Wanner: — ''The rubber stopper started to glow and it 
'glew' like everything." 
Item: — 

Y. M. C. A., in those days, meant: — "Young monkeys care- 
fully assorted" 
Item: — 

Prof. Shroyer: — (finding Groh cribbing on exam in Bible, 
and putting his hand on Sam's shoulder) "Young man, I believe 
Satan has a firm hold on you." 

Item: — 

Miss Clippinger '13: — "I want you to understand that 1 don't 
Jtand on trifles!" 

Vera Myers (looking at her feet) : — "No dear I see you don't." 



(And then, there were the pictures!) 



•THE CAMPUS WORM 



JUNIORS GIVE "YOU 

NEVER CAN TELL" 

(Continued from page 1) 



vited to a dinner party, and he prov- 
ed to be no other than the father, 
(Lutz) but he spurned the effort of 
reconciliation. 

The love affair of the dentist went 
on, and Lawyer Bohun (Kiehner), 
the son of the waiter, endeavored to 
disentangle the affairs. Although 110 
definite understanding is reached, one 
is led to believe that all goes better 
in the end. 

Perhaps the most humorous scene 
was when Valentine, at the ball, went 
over toward Gloria to dance with 
her; but just as he came, she went 
off with another. Then he turns 
to the other daughter, the same 
thing happens and likewise when he 
proceeds to the mother. It is then 
that he murmurs dejectedly, "I 
might as well be married already." 
But at the precise moment the 
thoughtful, diplomatic, and ever-pre- 
sent waiter (Aungst) appears on the 
scene and cheerfully proffers, "Yon 
never can tell, you never can tell." 

The part of the lively twins was 
played by Miss Brinser and Mr. Oye>- 
respectively Dolly and Philip. The 
part of ^Eamily Solicitor, McComas 
was played by. Mr. Klinger. Miss 
Ulrich took the part of Maid to the 
Dentist while Derickson and Emen- 
heiser were the assistant waiter and 
-Cervantes | the cook respectively. 



A remarkable feature of the play 
was the number of phrases which 
Bernard Shaw used which fit so eas- 
ily into our every-day life. One which 
even some of the professors have 
been using is this expression: "It is 
a principle in life with me." And 
how like it is for some of our well- 
learned students to say when they 
come here to college, "Judging from 
my knowledge of human nature — "! 

Dr. Wallace, who "cast" and di- 
rected the play, deserves a world of 
credit for his part in the presenta- 
tion. 



FIRST OF SEASON'S 

RECITALS IS GIVEN 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Nightingale, Rinsky Korsakow, The 
Sweet Singing, Olmstead, Benetta 
Burrier; Cantique d'amour, Liszt, 
Grace Daniel; On the Road to Man- 
dalay, Oley Speaks, On the Shore, 
Neidlinger, Wesley Carpenter; The 
Worrior's Song, Briggs, Bernita Stre- 
big. 

The recitals give the pupils a fine 
opportunity to learn to play in public. 
The Monday evening recital was not 
only for the advanced students who 
will participate in a series of Spring 
Recitals held during the months of 
May and the beginning of June, but 
for students of all ages and grades, 
some appearing in public for the first 
time. These recitals are worth at- 
tending so come out to the next one, 



A c ; 
dents t 



by 



the 



(j r ask a 
sins n 
^enten 
Snob 
led the 

ing *y 
total 
girls v- 
Heel by 
of the 
receive 
sins w< 
jrreligi 
jntoier 
lessnes 
culture 



"The 
bears 
down ; 
deed a 
at time 



A si 
not sa 
broke 
the Co 
Presidt 
inform 
of the 

FORfl 



lights 
talk d( 

Dr. 
perinte 
bis ac 
that v 
was a 
thinkir 
addres; 
practic 

Appi 
wed b 
and sti 
tod de 

The 
origin i 
amin 
erected 
has be 
depart: 
Pairs r 
Plete 1 
the la 
second 
'argem 
Astern 
coing < 
terior. 
r enova 

This 
a dvanc 
"lakim 

lar ged 
^a r p 

and tl 
^mer 
a cost 
48 We; 

Othe 
Mated 

*hich 

to om i 

>at e 

s ■ 

Sr' s 
^ther 

V 

The 

tr °ns? 
% 

"ten, 



LA VIE COLLEGCENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1928 



PAGE THREE 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



STUDENT SINS 

A canvass to determine the worst 
stu dent sins, as judged by the stu- 
dents themselves, is being carried or. 
jjy the Vespers committee of the Y. 
to C. A. of the University or Ne- 
braska, so that discussion of these 
s ins m a y be presented during the 
j^nten season. 

Snobbishness, with a vote of 4b, 
j e j the list, with cheating and drink- 
ing tying for second place, with a 
total of 37 votes each. Twenty-hve 
girls named smoking, usually quali- 
jjed by the phrase, "by girls" as one 
f the worst student sins, and petting 
reC eived 22 votes. Voles on other 
s j n s were scattered among profanity, 
jrreli&ion, extravagance, discourtesy, 
intolerance, falseness, thought- 
lessness, and lack of interest in 
culture. 

— The Bucknelliaa 



A PROBLEM! 
"The Cabinet" of Geneva College 
lears an editorial on "how to turn 
down a date gracefully." This is in- 
>d a "thought provoking question ' 
at times. 



A NEW RECORD 

A student of Ursinus, evidently 
not satished with his own record, 
broke in the college olfice and stole 
the College Historical records. The 
President has ottered a reward for 
information leading to the capture 
of the "naughty ooy". 



FORMAL RE-OPENING 

PROGRAM IS GIVEN 

(Continued From Page 1) 



lights which he interpersed made his 
talk doubly interesting. 

Dr. Fultz, of Washington, the Su- 
perintendent of Penn Conference, in 
bis address presented many ideas 
that were very timely. Dr. Fultz, 
was again true to his good clear 
thinking and the whole tenor of his 
address was along most clear-cut and 
practical lines. 
Appropriate musical numbers rend- 
ered by the members of the faculty 
a nd students made up a well-balanced 
a nd delightful program. 
The Engle Conservatory of Music, 
originally given by the late Benj- 
^in H. Engle, of Harrisburg, was 
er ected in 1897, and through the years 
^ been one of the most valuable 
departments of the college. The re- 
pairs recently completed were a com- 
plete re-construction of the interior, 
laying of hardwood floors, a 
^cond pipe organ, new seating, en- 
ar gement of the stage, new lighting 
, beautiful stage curtains, fres- 
within, and painting of the ex- 
teri °r. The complete cost of the 
Novation has been nearly $25,000. 
^his is but one of the physical 
^ancements that Lebanon Valley is 
joking. This year the President's 
0lr ie has been re-modelled and en- 
ar ged at a cost of $6,000; and last 
* ea r property on the Northwest cor- 
aer of the campus was purchased 
the residence remodelled for a 
0tI1 en's domitory. This was done at 
J c °st of $15,000 and is now known 
18 West Hall. 

Other improvements are contem- 
ned i n the near future, among 
f ^ch is a new and sanitary shower 
0ln in the Men's dorm and an ad- 
ulate "Y. M" room in the Men's 
I rri i where students can go for an 
t 0Ur 's enjoyment in the evening 
*th er than down town or to Leb- 

jjhe student body and alumni are 
^gly behind the college in these 
« an y and splendid improvements of 
^ campus which so directly affect 
student life and the future ad- 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



1 



ei nent of Lebanon Valley. 



CLIO-PHILO HOLD 

JOINT MEETING 

Clio and Philo joined ranks on 
Friday evening, March 9 in an at- 
tempt to settle the dispute about a 
pleasing calendar. The proposed 13- 
month calendar was rejected and the 
following adopted: — 

January, "Devotions", Esther Ang- 
stadt; February, "Swedish Chatter", 
Prof. Alexander Crawford; March, 
"The Winds", Leah Harpel; April, 
"Showers of Suitors", Bruce Behney, 
Byron Sheetz, Arnold Zwally, Milford 
Knisley, Jacob Horst, and Paul Barn- 
hart; May "A Jolly Dance", Clio 
girls; June, "Wedding Bells" with 
Mary McCurdy and Milford Knisley 
as the leading characters assisted by 
Rev. Byron Sheetz and numerous at- 
tendants. Preceding the ceremony, 
Miss Leah Miller sang "O Promise 
Me" and following the ordeal, 'T 
Love Only Thee." July, "Firecrack- 
ers", John Snyder; August, "Way 
Down Souf", Ruby Ann See; Sep- 
tember, "Cheese Box Quartette", 
John Rojahn, Russel Oyer, Harold 
Rider, Luther Rearick; October, 
"Musical Reading", Madeline Rife; 
November "Chills", Alice Kindt; De- 
cember, "Christmas Banquet". 

PHILOS ELECT 

AND INITIATE 



Philo's first election for the new 
year put the executive duties upon 
the following officers: 

President, Samuel Meyer; Vice Pres- 
ident, Harold Rider; Recording sec- 
retary, Edgar Hertzler; Correspond- 
ing secretary, C. Paul Barnhart; 
Chaplain, Palmer Slenker; Critic, 
Henry Kohler; Chairman of executive 
committee, Luther Rearick, Sergants 
at arms, Herbert Welker y Albert 
Miller, Lloyd Daub; Pianist, Warren 
Lebo. 

Friday evening, March 2, was set 
aside for the reception of new mem- 
bers and a full evening was enjoyed. 



CO-EDS WIN FROM 

WESTERN MARYLAND 
(Continued from page 1) 



with another two-pointer and here- 
after due to the accurate foul shoot- 
ing of Miss Lane, Lebanon Valley 
was never headed. The entire Leb- 
anon Valley team played fine basket 
ball. Misses Todd and Murphy starr- 
ed for Western Maryland. 
The Score:— 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G F P 

Meyer f 3 17 

Lane f 4 10 18 

J. Miller c 

I. Miller sc 

Cochran g 

Gorski g 

Total 7 11 25 

WESTERN MARYLAND 

G F P 

Engles f 10" 

Miles f 7 4 18 

Murphy f 

Johnson c 

Hamilton c 

Todd sc 5 

Willinger g 

Ward g 

Total 8 4 20 



KALOZETEANS PRE- 
SENT TWO PROGRAMS 



CONGRATULATIONS! 

The Clionian, Philokosmian, and 
Kalozetean Literary societies un- 
ite in congratulating their sister 
society, Delphian, on her success- 
ful Sixth Anniversary. 



Another of Kalo's usual interesting 
programs was given Friday night, 
March 2nd at 6:30 in Kalo Hall 
Various magazines and newspaper ar- 
ticles of interest were reported on by 
the following. 

The life of Houdini, Derickson; In 
Southern Training Camps, Wentz; 
Jokes, Albright; When Training for a 
Fight was no Picnic, Mayhew; Piano 
Solo, Kunkle; Alcohol is not a Med- 
icine, Calabrese. 

A short literary program was ren- 
dered on Friday night,Mar ch 9th due 
to the fact that the Philo-Clio joint 
session was held the same evening. 
The program was as follows: 

Airplanes and Radio, Heilman; Boy 
Scouts of America, Roudabush; Hoo- 
ver, the Man for the big jobs, Mor- 
gan; The First Cities in the Scientific 
World, Bruno. 



Y. M. AND Y. W. DELE- 
GATES REPORT 



On Sunday evening, March 4, the 
Y. W. and Y. M. met in a joint ses- 
sion to hear the reports of their del- 
egates to the Detroit and Gettysburg 
conferences. The latter was a fol- 
low-up of the former, and went into 
details on questions which were rais- 
ed in the first meeting. 

Lbanon Valley was represented at 
the Detroit Conference by Mae Ham- 
er and Ruth Strubhar, and at Gettys- 
burg Conference by; Jane Fearnow, 
Mildred Umholtz, Madeline Rife, 
Elizabeth Engle, Fred Christman and 
Lawrence Derickson. Each delegate 
reported on some part of the Con- 
ference which he attended. 

The Gettysburg Conference was 
divided into six commissions, each to 
discuss one of the following prob- 
lems: 

L Appreciation of other Religions 
and Cultures, 

II. Christian Unity. 

III. Mutuality in Missions. 

IV. The Quality of Christian Train- 
ing Needed Today. 

V. How Can Western Civilization 
Contribute to Bringing in the King- 
dom of God? 

IV. Translation of International 
Mindedness into Campus and Individ- 
ual Living. Each delegate was placed 
in a different Commission, so, that a 
complete report of the Conference 
would be made to the student body. 



"CHARLIE" JOINS 

ST. LOUIS CARDS. 

(Continued from page 1) 



On Friday, March 10, "Charlie" 
broke into the line-up of the Cards 
against the Philadelphia Athletics 
during the last two innings of the 
game. He was credited with one as- 
sist, but struck out in his single 
chance at the plate against Quinn. 
The Philadelphia Inquirer said of 
him: — 

"Gelbert, whose father's name was 
magic in Penn's football activities de- 
cades ago, and who himself won ac- 
claim in Lebanon Valley athletics, 
finished the game at short for the 
losers (The Cards). Te is a spry, 
young chap, who has a good throwing 
arm and covers ground." 

Every student is extremely proud 
of "Charlie" for he leaves behind him 
a host of friends who find in their 
regret at his leaving, a tinge of plea- 
sure for the opportunity which is his. 
On the campus there is a universal 
hope that he may be as successful in 
higher baseball as he was in scholas- 
tic athletics. 



DELPHIAN RESUMES 

WEEKLY PROGRAMS 



On Friday evening, March 9, a 
6:30, Delphian after several weeks 
of strenuous preparation for her An- 
niversary, again settled down to her 
weekly literary programmes. 

"Who", sung by Agnes Haertter, 
caused all the girls to ask the same 
question, who? It was then quite 
appropriate that the girls be given a 
"Recipe on How to Keep your Hus- 
band", a negro reading by Irene 
Schrope. A paper upon "Japanese 
Teas" written by Irene Schell, was 
very intereting. 

The Judiciary Committee has been 
working industriously, and the next 
few programmes promise to be most 
interesting. 



DELPHI ANS' SIXTH 

PROVES SUCCESS 

(Continued from page 1) 



for the second part of the program, 
the presentation of "Quality Street'' 
written by J. M. Barrie. 

The success of this part of the 
program is due to a great extent to 
the work of Miss Mary K. Wallace, 
who coached the play. Her splendid 
work showed itself in the capable 
way in which the play was presented 
and "cast". 

The costumes and settings were as 
charming as the play itself. Al- 
though the cast was admirably chosen 
and each interpretation was com- 
mendable, additional credit is due 
Miss Apgar, Miss Long, and Mr. 
Keene, who carried the "heavier" 
parts, and whose work was excep- 
tional. 

The cast included the Misses Dor- 
othy Heister, Edna Lang, Sara Lou 
Rose, Ruth Strubhar, Anna B .Apgar, 
Marion Heaps, Violet Morton, Ber- 
nita Strebig, Ruth March; and the 
Messieurs Maynard Wilson, Calvin 
Keene, Robert Roudabush, Alexander 
Grant, Robert and Henry Grimm. 

After the play, faculty, alumnae, 
and students enjoyed the reception 
held in North Hall parlor. 



The La Vie regrets to inform its 
readers of the death of Mrs. D. Al- 
bert Kreider on February 22j 1928. 
Mrs. Kreider before her marriage, 
was Anna Forney of Annville, Pa. 
She graduated from the Piano and 
Harmony Department of L. V. C. in 
1890. Mrs. Kreider, with her hus- 
band, a member of the faculty of 
Yale University, had been a member 
of the Cook Tours around the world, 
and during this trip, became ill quite 
suddenly while at sea. Burial was 
made at sea, due to conditions pre- 
vailing. 




House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville - P». 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

KODAKS Sc SUPPLIES, FILMS. 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING-- 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Printing - — Publishing 
Advertising 
Annville Penna. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 



THE HUB 



713 Cumberland Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



Photographs w S?1Sw 

Jf Forever BLAZIER & MILLER 

36 North Eighth Street, LEBANON, PA. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. THURSDAY. MARCH 15, 1928 



| Y.W.-Y.M.C.A. Notesj 



A SUGGESTION 

"Princeton in PeMn", "Oberlin in 
China", "Dartmouth in Turkey" and 
"Lebanon Valley in Africa" jare com- 
ing to be real and vital ventures in 
international friendship and good 
will. These projects are possible be- 
cause" students are internationally 
minded. 

In former years the students of 
Lebanon Valley always contributed 
to the "Martin Fund" which was so 
named in honor of Prof. Martin who 
was on the Albert Academy Faculty. 
This year Prof. Martin is on our own 
campus, but the work at Albert 
Academy is being continued never- 
theless and needs our financial sup- 
port. 

The annual budget for Albert 
Academy is $14,000. The Board in 
America must provide $6,000 of this 
amount and of this the Board to- 
gether with the "Y" Cabinets of the 
various United Brethren schools have 
set $1250 as a goal to be raised by 
, the students of these institutions. 

Is Lebanon Valley ready to join its 
efforts with other schools in this 
larger program? What will our school 
do in this united enterprise in world 
friendship? If the traditions and 
ideals of Lebanon Valley are worth 
while perpetuating in America, they 
are worth proprogating in Africa. 

In the near future each student 
will be asked to make a donation to- 
ward the "Albert Academy Fund" 
which is sponsored by the Y. W. and 
Y. M. C. A. of our campus. You are 
not to be begged and solicited and 
then to toss a coin as a condescend- 
ing act of charity or as a means to 
get rid of the person who asked you 
to give, but let each one of ^ou con- 
sider just how much of the money 
dad "checks out" to .you or that you 
yourself earn, do you actually give 
straight forward to any philanthropic 
project. A very small amount indeed, 
it is when we really compare the sum 
to what we spend selfishly on our- 
selves. 

L Because I believe "Albert 
Academy Project" noble and worth 
while. 

2. Beecause I want my school to 
do its share in the budget. 

3. Bebause out of the unselfish- 
ness of my heart and my desire to 
do my share to prove my friendship 
for other students. 

I will make a free will contri- 
bution to the "Albert Academy 
Fund." 

Watch this Spirit grow! 



RELATIONS WITH 

ALBRIGHT BROKEN 

(Continued from page 1) 



This is true, insofar as he cancelled 
the Albright games when the Red 
and White authorities refused to live 
up to the "Little Three" rules drawr 
up over a year ago. In an official 
report from Mylin's office, the coach 
stated .that the above rules bar trans- 
fer students until they have complet- 
ed a year's work at the college they 
have transferred to. Furthermore 
no min is eligible to play until he 
gains (full academic steanding. How- 
ever, ft is reported, Albright violated 
the transfer rule in last fall's foot- 
ball games with Schuylkill and Leb- 
anon Valley, giving no assurance that 
they would discontinue this practice 
in future contests. Further, the fac- 
ulty of Albright declared two men 
eligible for the second meeting in 
basketball between Lebanon Valley 
and Albright who have not yet com- 
pleted a year's work at the Myers- 
town institution. They transferred 
from another School last fall. 

It is expected that other relations, 
such as those of debating contests, 
etc., will also be severed. The above 
should clear up the matter for alum- 
ni and other interested persons. 



LOCAL CAGERS WIN 

TWO AND LOSE TWO* 

(Continued from page 1) 
LEBANON VALLEY 



Miller c 



Total 



GETTYSBURG 



G 


F 


P 


3 


1 


7 


4 


1 


9 





1 


1 


1 


2 


4 


2 





4 


4 





3 











3 


2 


8 


17 


7 


41 


G 


F 


P 


6 


2 


14 


4 





8 


1 





1 





1 


1 


2 





4 


4 


2 


10 


1 


1 


3 


18 


6 


42 



Referee — Boyer. 
Annville, March 7: — 

Proving that their one point vic- 
tory at Lancaster was not a fluke 
Lebanon Valley vanquished Franklin 
and Marshall here to-night 43-36. 
Franklin & Marshall proved danger- 
ous at all times, and it took steady 
playing fo.- the Lebanon Valley team 
to maintain its. advantage. 

Piela starred for - Lebanon Valley 
with 33 points. He was unstoppoble 
the second half, caging goals from all 
parts of the floor. Biown was F. & 
M's big gun. This was the Blue and 
White's last home game, and closed 
a very successful home season in 
which only one game was lost, that 
to Gettysburg 42-41. 

The F. & M. Score: — 

LEBANON VALLEY 
G 



F P 
2 2 
1 1 



5 



1 



p 

4 10 



Miller f-c 

Bell g 

Brubaker f 

Piela f 13 7 33 

Wheeler c-g 1 

Pier sol g 

Shroyer f 

Albright g. 1 

Total 15 13 43 

FRANKLIN & MARSHALL 
G F 

Kulp f 3 

Rupp f 2 4 

McCune g 2 1 & 

Coleg 2 4 

White g t 

Brown g 3 7 13 

Total I 2 12 36 

Referee— Boyer. 

Collegeville, March 9:— 

Ursinus had little trouble defeating 
Lebanon Valley here to-night' 62-28. 
It was not the same Blue and White 
team that defeated F. & M. twonights 
before. Ursinus experienced little 
trouble in penetrating the Lebanon 
Valley defense. Bigley had little dif- 
ficulty swishing the nets for eight 
baskets in the first half. Moyer took 
up Bigley's job the second half and 
dented the cords for eight two point- 
ers. Albright and Miller did most of 
Lebanon Valley's scoring. 

LEBANON VALLEY 
G 

Miller f-c 2 

Piela f 2 

Bliechert f 

Shroyer f 

Wheeler c 1 

Bell g 1 

Piersol g J? 2 

Brubaker g 1 

Albright g 6 10 

Total 10 8 28 

URSINUS 

G F P 

Hoagey f 10 2 

Young f —-x 5 10 

Weidensal f 

Bigley f 9 18 

Peters f 

Shink c 2 2 6 

Newcomer g 12 4 

Strine g 

Moyer g 9 4 22 

Francis g 

Total _T. 27 8 62 

Referee — Emery. 



F 

3 
2 




2 2 
2 
1 




Philadelphia, March 10:— 

Lebanon Valley closed its basket 
ball season here to-night by giving 
Drexel its only home defeat of the 
season 38-27. The game was of the 
rough house variety, reminding one 
of the old time two handed dribble 
game, when personal fouls were ta- 
boo. 

Drexel showed flashes of form but 
were unable to efficiently break up 
the passing of the Annville Collegians 
Wheeler played a great game for 
Lebanon Valley, being all over the 
floor. His combination of offensive 
and defensive play was the feature 
of the game. Piela of Lebanon Val 
ley and Hey of Drexel also starred. 
LEBANON VALLEY 

G F P 

Bleichert f 10 2 

Miller f 

Piela f _._ 6 6 18 

Brubaker f 

Wheeler c 6 1 13 

Piersol g 

Albright g 10 2 

Bell g 113 

Total 15 8 38 

DREXEL 

G F P 

Shnipis f 113 

Tuckle f 11 

Logan f 

Hey f ; 5 1C 

Dobbins c 15 7 

Davis c 

Shwartz g 12 4 

Gregory g 1 1 

Total 9 9 27 

Referee — Abrahams. 



SOPHS BOW BEFORE 

THEIR SUPERIORS 

The Senior-Soph game, held in the 
gym at 6 o'clock on Tuesday evening 
proved to be a much "better game" 
than its predecessor, the Soph-Frosh 
game of the week before. While the 
latter proved to be a "battle royal", 
Fritz Miller held Tuesday's game in 
check, so that a closely and well played 
game resulted. Brubaker and Shroy- 
er were high scorers, but scleral 
others on both teams played excellent 
games. 

The Score:— 

SENIORS 

G F P 

Lux f 113 

Brubaker f 4 3 11 

Koch f 

Elberti c 2 15 

Fornwalt g 2 4 

Knisley g 

Total 9 5 23 

SOPHS 

fG F P 

Shroyer f 3 4 10 

Barnhart f i. 3 6 

Keene c 1 11 

Hertzler c _ T _ X 

Bendigo g %L- — 11 

Zappia g ' 

Cunjack g 

Total 6 6 18 

Time of halves 20 minutes. 

Referee— F. Miller. 

Scorer — H. Nitrauer. 

Time Keeper — D. Calabrese. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St Annville, Pa. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



FROSH LOSE IN 

ANNUAL B. B. GAME 

L. V. C, March 8— 

The annual Frosh-Spoh basket- 
ball war took place to-day in the 
Alumni Gym, the Sophmores emev/- 
ing on top 30-19. Eve-' y thing "went" 
from flying tackles to blocking as 
taught by Knute Rockne. The Sophs 
were never in danger Of losing any- 
thing but teeth, arms, legs et . 
Freshmen gladiators stood the ga«f 
well, but made touchdowns instead 
of field goals and therefore lost their 
annual basket ball (?) battle. 

The Score:— 

FRESHMAN 



Wood g 



SOPHOMORES 



G 


P 


P 


2 





4 


1 





2 





2 


2 


2 


1 


5 











2 





4 











1 





2 











8 


s 


19 


G 


F 


P 


2 


1 


5 


3 


1 


7 


3 


2 


8 


4 





8 














2 


2 




















12 


6 


30 



Referee — Wallace and Piersol. 



Thomas W. Gray, who received his 
B. S. at L. V. in 1902, visited his 
Alma Mater in the past week. He 
has just accepted a position as prin- 
cipal at Millerstown, Pa. 



At the parsonage of Reverenl 
Guyer of Middletown, Pa., Carl M. 
Bachman was united in marriage with 
Miss Charlotte Schell of the same 
place, on March 3, 1928. Mr. Bach- 
man received his A. B. at L. V. in 
1924. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

LumLar and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 
LEBANON. PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 
Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 



UNION EMBLEM CO 



PALMYRA, PA. 



Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



EOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS— TRY 



THE PENNWAY 



OPPOSITE P. O. 



A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 

HARRY W. LIGHT 

43 EAST MAIN STREET, ANNVILLE. PA. 



HAIL ! 
TO THE 
QUEEN OF MAY 



lafieColkaieirat 



BASEBALL 
SCHUYLKILL 
WED., APRIL 11 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 1928 



NUMBER 12 



Y.M.-Y.W. OFFICERS 
ARE INSTALLED 

Dr. Gossard Speaks As New Of- 
ficers Are Installed 
In Chapel 



The Y. M. C. A. together with the 
Y. W. C. A. officially began their 
year's work with the formal install- 
ation of officers which took place in 
the Chapel yesterday morning. The 
program consisted of very short and 
pointed addresses from the outgoing 
presidents of the two organizations 
and the incoming ones, and this was 
followed by a statement from Presi- 
dent Gossard by way of conferring 
upon the new officers their responsi- 
bilities. 

As has been announced through 
these columns in the last issue the 
President of the Y. W. is Miss Ernme- 
line Shaffer who takes the place of 
Miss Eleanor Snoke who has served 
admirably during the last year. 

The officers of the Y. M. elected 
last week were as follows: Mr. 
Derickson is the new president t"> 
succeed Mr. Behney; Hazelton, Vice 
president, Mr. Mentzer having served 
last year; for Secretary, William 
Meyers succeeding Mr. Aungst; and 
John Snyder succeeds Hazelton as the 
new treasurer. 

The other members of the Y. M. 
staff will be appointed by the presi- 
dent to serve with him. The remain- 
ing eight members of the Cabinet are 
made heads of special committees 
having responsibility for carrying 
forward very specific parts of the 
year's program, Dr. R. R. Butter- 
wick and Prof. G. A. Richie are the 
faculty advisors of the Y. M. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



GLEE CLUB GIVES 

FIVE CONCERTS 

Club Visits Waynesboro, Green- 
castle, Red Lion, Baltimore 
And Washington 



Heralded as one of the outstanding 
college einging organizations of 
the year and with its program men- 
tioned in highest lerms of praise in 
newspaper accounts, the Lebanon 
Valley College Men's Glee Club re- 
turned from its second trip of the 
1928 tour with a just feeling of pride 
at its remarkable successes in every 
concert. No little credit is due Prof. 
Alexander Crawford for his untiring 
efforts in behalf of the club. 

Five concerts were given during 
the trip, and in no one of them was 
any individual number neglected, but 
all were well received by large ap- 
preciative audiences. Probably the 
most welcome and best liked number 
of the entire program is the sketch, 
"A Girl to Order," but Russell's cor- 
net solos and Carpnter's bass solos 
received their share of commendation. 

Almost 1000 persons turned out to 
hear the club in Waynesboro, Pa., on 
the first night of the trip. The con- 
cert was given in the United Breth 
r en Church in that place, and the 
main auditorium became crowded, 
making it necessary to take care of 
the overflow in the Sunday School 
room. 



(Continued on page 4) 



STAR COURSE NUM- 
BERS ANNOUNCED 

Russell Oyer Chairman Of Com- 
mittee For Next Year Com- 
pletes Program 

The Star. Course Committee, with 
Mr. Russell Oyer as chairman, has 
announced its program (consisting of 
four carefully selected numbers for 
the Redpath Lyceum Bureau) for the 
coming year. The numbers were se- 
lected for the purpose of affording 
a larger variety of entertainment 
than we have had during previous 
years. 

The first number will be a "Comi- 
cal tragedy" of married life by Frank 
Craven, entitled "The Firsl v 
The story of this clean cut comedy 
relates to the first year of married 
life, its laughter and sorrow, its sun- 
shine and shadow, as folks hav? 
lived it and are living it now, in 
every American home. 

(Continued on page 4 J 



TENNIS SCHEDULE 
COMPLETE FOR '28 

Matches Are Scheduled With 
Five Colleges In 
Six Matches 



After a number of disappointments, 
all of which have now righted them- 
selves, Manager Russell C. Oyer has 
completed the 1928 Tennis schedule 
under the supervision of Coach Ben- 
nett. The Lebanon Valley netmen 
will meet the racquet wielders from 
five other colleges in six matches ac- 
cording to present arrangements, but 
another match is pending with Get- 
tysburg. 

Urisinus will be the May Day at- 
traction for the local court fans. Un- 
less the match now pending with Get- 
tysburg is arranged, there will be no 
(Continued on page 4) 



SENIORS LOSE B. B. 

GAME TO JUNIORS 



On Monday evening, March 26, the 
juniors defeated the seniors in their 
annual basket-ball "brawl", 33-^2. 
Jap Albright blew the whistle for the 
for the contest. Rank, Wallace, Lux, 
Orbock, Brubaker, Singley, Elberti, 
and Knisley played for the seniors, 
With Brubaker leading in the 
scoring. Wood, Hovis, Wilson, 
Wentz, and Laurie appeared in the 
junior line-up. Wood, Hovis and Wil- 
son had three buckets each. Then 
seniors led at half-time, 18-16. Nit- 
rauer was official scorer. The can, 
pus is now looking forward to the 
probable Senior-Faculty "panic". 



MILLER ELECTED 

GIRLS' CAPTAIN 



Miss Irene Miller was elected to 
lead the Lebanon Valley Girl's bas- 
ketball team for the season of 1928. 
Miss Miller has been a star player 
and one of the mainstays of the 
sextette for the last three years. Her 
election is a popular one, and looked 
upon with favor by the student body. 
The entire school joins in wishing 
Miss Miller and her team mates the 
greatest success for next season. 




FRANCES LONG 
1928 QUEEN OF THE MAY 

"HAIL TO THE QUEEN!" 

At the election held in chapel 
yesterday morning, Frances Long, 
popular senior, of Bordentown, N. 
J., was elected May Queen of the 
1928 Court, "Fran"— she of the 
ready smile — was an almost un- 
animous choice. As well liked 
as she is pretty, she will make "the 
perfect queen'. 

"Jerry" Hafer, of Chambersburg 
was honored with the place of 
Maid of Honor. The attendants 
are as follows: — Bernice Hoover, 
Grace Daniel, Benetta Burrier, 
Mary Geyer, Elsie Reider and 
Olga Freeman. 

Miss Emma Shaeffer, newly elecc- 
ed Y. W. C. A. president, had 
charge of the election. Plans are 
alrady under way for the 1928 
May Day Exercises. 



EUHYDICE APPEARS 
IN HOME CONCERT 

Girls Give Well-Balanced Pro- 
gram In Annual Home 
Concert 



The Eurydice Choral Club of Leb- 
anon Valley College, under the li- 
rection of Miss Ruth Engle, gave its 
annual home concert in Engle Hall on 
Thursday evening, Mar. 22. The pro- 
gram consisted of selections by the 
club, vocal solos, - readings, piano solo 
and an "operetta". 

The number sung 1 y the club were 
well selected and beautifully sung. 
The program opened with the Alma 
Mater and "Salutation". There was 
a group of pieces in old English and 
Scotish dialects the first "Sumer is I 
cumen in" being in the form of n 
round, with the last part in Modern 
form. The other two were "Whisle 
My Lad" and "The Abode of Love". 
The next group formed a delightful 
contrast with the former. The num- 
bers in this group were "Beau Soir". 
"The Wind", "Rain", and "Deep Riv- 
er". The quiet smoothly flowing solo 
in Beau Soir was sung in a very com- 
mendable manner by Miss Benetta 
Burrier. Another number by the club 
was a sacred selection "Reve Angli- 
que", in which Irene Peter 
sang the contralto solo, with 
Alcesta Slichter, the club's capable 
violinist, playing the violin obligato. 
The last two numbers, "A May Dey 
Carol" and "Valse Arietta" were es- 
pecially well rendered and formed a 
fitting ending to the program. 

Miss Grace Daniel played the livel'/ 
"Juba Dance" (by Dett) in which she 
displayed her fine technique and rhy- 
thm. Miss Spatz with her clear and 
sweet soprano voice charmed the 
(Continued on pajjO 1) 



CO-EDS END UP 

WITH VICTORY 

Avenge Former Juniata Defeat 
With 26-22 Victory 
Over Rivals 



Annville, March 17: — 

Lebanon Valley's Co-eds defeated 
the Juniata Sextette here to-night 26 
-22. This victory avenged the defeat 
administered by Juniata at Hunting- 
ton earlier in the season. The game 
was close and hardfought throughout. 
Lebanon Valley went into the lead 
early in the game, when Miss Lane 
made good two free throws. Juniata 
soon tied the score but was never 
able to forge ahead. Lebanon Valley 
lead at half time 16-11. In the second 
half both teams played on even terms 
Lebanon Valley scoring 10 points 
while Juniata swished the cords for 
11 points. 

Misses Meyer and Freeman playing 
their last game for Lebanon Valley 
(Continued on page 4) 



FROSH GIRLS ARE 

GUESTS AT TEA 

Mrs. Gossard And Junior Girls 
Make Charming Enter- 
tainment Possible 



Mrs. G. D. Gossard entertained the 
girls of the Freshman class at a St. 
Patrick's Tea on Wednesday after- 
noon at 3:30 o'clock at her home. 
Mrs. Gossard, assisted by Mrs. Green 
and a few Junior girls, class cousins 
to the first year girls, proved to be 
a very able and entertaining hostess. 
A short program was given including 
the following numbers: — A St. Patty's 
Dance by Florence Miller and Miriam 
Hershey; a few selected readings by 
Edna Lang; a piano solo by Ruth 
Strubhar; another dance by Mildred 
(Continued on page 3) 



KALOS SPONSOR 

CHAPEL PROGRAM 



Students who missed Chapel last 
Thursday morning missed a "high- 
powered program", (to quote Dr. 
Wagner) for the Kalos were on hand 
with the "wherewithal" for a merry 
morning. Besides some consummate- 
ly executed piano novelty solos by 
Orville Kunkle '29, a quartet com 
posed of Kiehner, '29, Mentzer, '29; 
Shroyer, '30 and Russell, '31, sang 
two groups of popular numbers, in- 
cluding "Dream Kisses", "I Told 
Them All About You", "Just Once 
Again", and "Is She My Girl Friend" 
Kalo will probably furnish another 
Thursday morning program at a later 
date. 



PIELA TO PILOT 

NEXT YEAR'S TEAM 



At a recent meeting of the 'Letter" 
men Stanley Piela star forward was 
elected basketball captain for next 
season. Piela has been a star per- 
former for three years. This season 
he led the team in scoring with a 
total of 257 points for 18 games. 
Everyone acquainted with Piela's 
ability as a court star feels sure he 
will have another great year next 
season as captain of the team. 



KALOS PREPARING 
FORHFTY-FIRST 

Cast Is Working On Milne Play 
— Second Annual Ban- 
quet Planned 



Extensive preparations are beipg 
carried out for another eventful an- 
niversary of Kalo. This will be the 
fifty-first birthday of Kalo, and each 
year these programs have been strik- 
ing events of the college year. The 
regular date is Friday evening, April 
13th, two days after Easter vacation 
ends. 

This year the Society is presenting 
a play by Milne, entitled "The Dover 
Road." The Cast is now hard at worn 
in the production of a first class en- 
tertainment, under the direction of 
Mary K. Wallace. 

Kalo is following the new custom 
of having the reception in North Hall. 
All the committees are very busy and 
enthusiastic in making this anniver- 
sary a memorable event. One of the 
features will be a fifteen piece sym- 
phony orchestra under the leader- 
ship of Franklin Kiehner, L. V. grad- 
uate of the Conservatory '26, and 
brother of Miles. 

Last year the Kalo Alumni banquet 
which followed the Anniversary was 
so successful that it was resolved at 
that time to make the affair an ann- 
ual institution and custom. This year 
the banquet will be held at Chef's 
Place on Saturday night at 6:00 P. M. 
The Society has been in communi- 
cation with its extensive and far- 
scattered alumni, and it is expected 
that there be another splendid fellow- 
ship rally at this year's Kalo banquet. 
Rev. P. B. Gibble a well known alum- 
nus will be the toastmaster at the 
banquet. 



LOCAL QUINTET 
WINSJ0--L0SES 8 

Piela Is High Scorer As Blue 
And White Completes 
Successful Season 



Lebanon Valley closed its basket 
ball season March 10 with a well 
earned victory over Drexel at Phila- 
delphia. The team enjoyed a very 
successful season winning more than 
half their games, the actual count 
being 10 victories and 8 defeats. 
Juniata, the first game of the season, 
proved a victory 43-32. Later they de- 
feated Lebanon Valley 39-22. Schuyl- 
kill fell twice by scores of 32-11 and 
51-35. Penn State followed with a 
victory for State 41-22. Mt St. Mary's 
and Western Maryland each took a 
game, winning 46-28 and 38-34 re- 
spectively. Susquehanna was beaten 
51-29. Muhlenberg won their first 
game in six years 39-30. Dickinson 
proved too strong, winning 51-42, as 
did Georgetown, who triumphed 52- 
29. The next three games were vic- 
tories for Lebanon Valley. Albright 
our old rival was taken into camp 
51-31. Ursinus dropped one 45-29. 
Franklin and Marshall lost out in a 
close game 30-29. Gettysburg won in 
a thrilling game by the narrow mar- 
gin of 42-41. Franklin and Marshall 
took a second whipping this time 43- 
36. Ursinus avenged her defeat 
(Continued on page 2.) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE CQLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 1928 



Iaiie€olIqienne 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chiel 

H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 
Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '3o 

Athletics G. CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '28 

Clio MARY E. McCURDY, '3U 

Delphian ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Kalo MILES S. K1EHNER, '29 

Philo JOHN W. BEATT1E, '29 

General JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '2<d 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTER WICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 6 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



EDITORIALS 



AFTER GRADUATION WHAT? 

The May Day election brings to our minds that spring- is here 
at last. And in the spring- a young- man's fancy turns to tnouglits 
of, (among other things; graduation! But alter graduation, 
what? . 

The business of getting a job may be very beautifully ex- 
plained in a correspondence course for a certain sum, but that 
is not getting a position. Men no longer walk from the doors of 
their Alma Mater confident that there is a position waiting for 
them. Today they find themselves in the midst of unparalleled 
competition. They must be prepared to light their way in the 
great process called 'The Survival of The fittest." r\o, Seniors, 
—your work is not soon over. It is just beginning. Happiness 
is the sure sign that one has found his true vocation. Are you 
happy? 




"HAPPINESS " 

"Happiness grows at our own fire 
sides, and is not to be picked in 
strangers' gardens." 

—Douglas Jerrold 



"It is in the nature of things that 
those who are incapable of happiness 
should have no idea of it. Happiness 
is not for wild animals, who can only 
oscillate between apathy and passion. 
To be happy, even to conceive hap- 
piness, you must be reasonable or 
(if Nietzche prefers the word) you 
must be tamed. You must have tak- 
en the measure of your powers, learn- 
ed your place in the world and what 
things in it can really serve you. To 

be happy you must be wise " 

— Geo. Santayana 



PASSING ON. 



This issue marks the last for the 1927-28 "La Vie" regime. 
The old staff is "passing on". 

The work has had its compensations, as it nasi had its dis- 
appointments. Compensations, disappointments, successes, fail- 
ures, thiills, expectations — all these are gone. New people are 
stepping into our places: there will be a new "La Vie"— almost! 
On us they must build, as we have built upon those who have 
gone before us. We hope we have done, well! 

Next year, at this time, someone else will be writing this; 
someone else will be working, writing, planning, for the last 
time. The old staff will be "passing on " 



"Happiness itself is a sufficient ex- 
cuse. Beautiful things are right and 
true; so beautiful actions are those 
pleasing to the gods. Wise men have 
an inward sense of what is beautiful 
and the highest wisdom is to trust 
this intuition and be guided by it. 
Thee answer to the last appeal of 
what is right lies within a man's own 
breast. Trust thyself!" • 



— Aristotle 

"The happiness of a man in this 
life does not consist in the absence, 
but in the mastery of his passions." 

— Tennyson 



"Real happiness is cheap enough, 
yet how dearly we pay for its coun- 
terfeit." 

— -Ballon 



"The rays of happiness, like those 
of light, are colorless when un- 
broken." 

— Longfellow 



THE OFFER OF A COLLEGE 

"To be at home in all lands and all ages; to count Nature a 
familiar acquaintance and Art an intimate friend; to gain a 
standard for the appreciation of other men's work, and the criti- 
cism of your own; to carry the keys of the world's greatest library 
in your pocket, and feel it's resources behind you in whatever 
you undertake; to make hosts of friends among the men of your 
own age who are to be leaders in all walks of life; to lose your- 
self in generous enthusiasm, and co-operate with others tor com- 
mon ends; to learn manners from students who are gentlemen, 
and form character under professors who are Christian— this is 
the offer of the College, for the four best years of your life-"— 
Dr. William De Witt Hyde, Bowdoin College. 



BASE BALL SCHEDULE 1928 

April 12 '_ Schuylkill Away 

April 14 Juniata at Homa 

April 20 Bucknell at Home 

April 21 Gettysburg at Home 

April 25 .Lafayette Away 

April 28 W. Maryland at Home 

May 1 Villanova Away 

at Home 



May 5 Ursinus 

May 8 Mt. St. Mary's Away 

May 9 Georgetown Away 

May 12 Susquehanna at Home 

May 18 Juniata Away 

May 19 Bucknell Away 

May 23 Schuylkill at Home 

May 25 Susquehanna Away 

May 26 : Penn State Away 

June 2 Mt. St. Mary's at Home 



"The foolish man seeks happiness 
in the distance; the wise grows it 
under his feet." 

— James Oppenheim 




'O wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



—BURNS 



A current campus, topic concerns the reason why Prof. 
Stokes, in chaperoning the hikes of his physical training class, 
always walks in the .rear. There is no apparent reason why he 
cannot walk on the side, except that by walking behind, a path 
through the mud is already made for him, and the farmers 
cannot see him so well. 



How about agitating for a May King election. Let the 
fellows enjoy a little of the thrill too. Of course it stands to 
reason the King can't be elected on good looks, but ways and 
means could be found. 



Another mess of neophytes have begun practice teaching. 
Another group of college students will for the first time in their 
four years at college begin to study. Another group of young 
men and women will learn that the high school puplis of today 
are not what they were when they went to sfchool. 



Anyone who attended the Junior-Senior basketball game 
will recognize that in Peaches Elberti another star has been dis- 
covered. Everyone wondered why such a quiet person should 
wear such a loud uniform. 



Even though there have been no official mid-semester, 
exams, spring is here, and "with it the robins", so its time for 
the Campus Worm to do his farewell act. But before he leaves 
he can't resist passing on a few good ones ; ; it's irresistible, es- 
pecially when there are such good subjects as Klinger. He's 
the bird who always eats so fast that "The Kid" (in order to 
leave the dining room in time to siee him) must go without 
dessert. 



"We can only have the highest hap 
piness, such as goes along with being 
a great man, by having wide 
thoughts, and much feeling for the 
rest of the world as ourselves; and 
this sort of happiness often brings 
so much pain with it that we can 
only tell it from pain by itsbeing 
what we would choose before every- 
thing else, because our souls see it 

is good And remember, if you 

were to choose something lower 

calamity might come just the same; 
and it would be calamity falling on a 
base mind, which is the one form of 

sorrow that has no balm in it " 

— George Eliot 



"No man is happy who does not 
think himself so." 

— Pubulis Syrus 



"The way to bliss lies not on beds of 
down, 

And he that had 'AO cross deserves 
no crown!" 

— Quarle? 



"And there is even a happiness, 
That makes the heart afraid." 



—Hood 



They grow better year by year: Last year Jitney Brubaker's 
experience with the Y. M. meal ticket at the York Cafeteria 
was considered good — but this year that one has. been surpassed 
by Scrunt Rider, who entered that self -same cafeteria and, seat- 
ing himself, waited to be served. e 



Now that baseball practice has begun it will furnish an 
adequate outlet for campus energy and save the few window 
panes remaining in the boys' dorm. 



Whoever used the covers, of "College Humor" for the "Don't 
walk on the Paths" signs has a fine sense of humor. 



The boys' aorm is a firm believer in a "back to nature" move- 
ment. Their ability to imitate animal calls is improving. Of 
course it should come natural to them. 



The Campus Worm wishes the best of luck to its successor 
and dies with only this advice — "Say not what you have to say 
but what you ought". The worm would also like to thank the 
campus for so kindly submitting, as subjects for the column, to 
its frequent outbursts. 



The Derricks,on-Engle-Kiehner combination successfully in- 
vaded Washington last week-end, just a few days after our august 
Glee Club had rather thoroughly "browned" it. "Mike" is i« 
a quandry, for the Sunday School teacher at the U. B. Church 
very hopefully inquired of him, "Oh, are you going to locate 
here?" 

— THE CAMPUS WORM 



l 



"V 
nell 
eds i 
man; 
we v 

W 
Leba 
one i 



A 

Midcl 
wise 
matti 
crow 



Th« 
conv( 
Colbj 
clipp< 

"W 
inteix 
have 
of Wi 
bates 
traini 
ing, a 
we cc 
had t 
ers. 
We d 
of ou 
side 1 
every 
deveh 
lost t 
that v 

Spe 
Rober 
discov 
have 1 
when 
game, 
pride 



Dr. 
the Ui 
tha st 
"Frien 
life's 
to offt 
and g 
of the 
lege h 
fcolleg 
times 

valuab 



Obei 
ters a 
Kappa 
Were 
Wolfe i 
five m< 
here, 
incenti 
countr; 
honors. 

M 

Actii 
Way to 
fege. ; 
College 
engage 
their si 
demaru 
care oi 
80 to ; 



Our 1 
* "pre 
Pnivers 
Cou nc i| 

' r anchi 
pshrnt 
* r e not 
e s if , 

^earhu 



eir ca 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 



PAGE THREE 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



COLLEGE MEN ? ? ? 

"What is the matter with the Buck 
nell men? Don't they please the co- 
eds any more? When we hear how 
many go to Penn State each week-end 
we wonder what the reason may be.' 

The Bucknellian 

Why do Lebanon Valley men go to 
Lebanon every Saturday night, — and 
one to Cleona? 



A WISE MAN 

A wise man is President Moody of 
Middleburg College, for he speak* 
wise words: "It is the game that 
matters, not the applause of the 
crowd." 

— The Juniatian 



WIN OR LOSE 

The following was taken from a 
conversation betwen the President of 
Colby College and Merle Crowell, 
clipped from the American Magazine 

"We have been winning a lot of 
intercollegiate debates. But we could 
have won even more if all we thought 
of was victory. As I saw it, our de- 
bates were held for the purpose of 
training young men in public speak 
ing, and not just to seee what laurels 
we could bring home. Last season we 
had two or three outstanding debat- 
ers. Did we use them all the time? 
We did not. In every debate some 
of our best men were sitting on the 
side lines because we wanted to give 
everyone on the squad a chance to 
develop his talents under fire. If we 
lost the debate the debate was ali 
that we lost! 

Speaking of Athletics, president 
Roberts said, we've made two great 
discoveries: One is that we don't 
have to win. And the second is that 
when we lose we lose nothing but a 
game. We don't lose our college 
pride or our self-respect, for example. 



FRIENDSHIP 

Dr. John Hart, student pastor at 
the University of Penna., addressing 
tha student body of Dickinson says, 
"Friendship is the dearest of all 
life's associations which college has 
to offer. The art of making friend, 
and getting along with them is one 
of the rare achievements which col- 
lege has to offer the average student. 
College friendships mean more often 
times in after life than the diploma 

because they are always a 

valuable asset." The Dickinsonian 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



PHILOS PRESENT 

TWO PROGRAMS 



On the eve of St. Patrick's Day, 
Philo members were treated to an 
appropriate program, fully in keep- 
ing with the time, which the mem- 
bers thoroughly enjoyed throughout. 

"President Cosgrave's Visit", was 
brought to Annville by Harvey L. 
Nitrauer. Albert Miller then began 
work on "Flooding the California's 
Green Valley", and vividly portrayed 
the west coast disaster. Due to his 
experience under the spell of the 
moon, Elmer Keiser was given an 
opportunity to tell of "Green Cheese" 
and this pathetically humorous sel- 
ection gave way to a more sober dis 
cussion of "Teapot Dome's Green 
Oil" by Elwood Meyers. Palmer 
Slenker showed his patriotism by 
"The Wearing of the Green", but 
Monroe Martin brought the subject 
back to the United States by speaking 
of "Lindberg's Tarnish of Overpub- 
licity." 

On Friday March 23, the members 
of Philo presented an extemporane- 
ous program which provided a 
wealth of information. Millard Mill- 
er started things going by dabbing 
into politics on the subject, "The 
Presidential Prospects." "Last Night 
You Belonged to Somebody Else But 
Tonight You Belong to Me", was a 
very delicate but well mastered sub- 
ject by Dave Rank. Byron Sheetz 
made a public confession in sp<»-' " 
on the subject "Fifty Miles per Hour 
And Why," Charles Wise then intro- 
duced the audience to "The 'Whys' 
of the Coal Region", while Qhl Kuhn 
explored "The Great Out Doors. 1 ' 
Albert Sitlinger delved into a long 
literary discussion on "Why I Read 
The Cosmopolitan", then Francis Ban 
gave as final advice, "Go West Young- 
Man — Go West". The literary meet 
ing was followed by a very import 
ant business session. 



KALOZETEANS GIVE 

TWO AND ELECT 



On Friday evening, March 16, Kalo 
presented a' literary program with its 
usual "vim and vigor". It was as 
follows: 

Rodman Wanamaker, Disney; 
Possibilities for the Coming Presiden- 
tial Campaign, Bechtel; Doings in the 
U. S. Senate, Derickson; Piano, Kieh- 
ner; Resume of Basketball Season, 
Koch. 

A short business meeting was then 
held, for the purpose of electing of- 
ficers for the spring term, at which 
time the following officers were 
elected: 

President, Darkes Albright; Vice 
President, Henry Aungst; Recording 
Secretary Lawrence Derickson; Cor- 
responding Secretary, James Hazel- 
ton; Critic, W. Otterbein Emmenheis- 
er; Chaplain, William Blatt; Editoi- 
Examiner, Heilman; Sgt.-at-Arms : 
Tetter; Assistant Sgt.-at-Arms, Mor- 
gan; Pianist, Kiehner. 
iner, Heilman. 

On last Friday evening the subject 
of the program was, "Spring". The 
following numbers were presented: 

Spring Styles, Wentz; Springs 
Manifestations, Vanderwall; Spring 
Ten Years Ago, Waggoner; Spring 
Blues, Kunkle; Spring Fever, (Its 
Cures), Blatt. 



FROSH GIRLS ARE 

GUESTS AT TEA 

(Continued from page 1) 



A FINE CUSTOM 

Gettysburg College students meet- 
ing a stranger on the campus salute 
politely and greet the visitor with a 
pleasant "Good Morning or "Good 
Afternoon." 



A NEW INCENTIVE 

Oberlin, Ohio, (IP).— Sport roads- 
ters as a substitute for Phi Beta 
Kappa keys as scholarship awards 
Were suggested by Professor John 
Wolfern, of Oxford, England, for 
five months a professor of chemistry 
here. He declared that not enough 
incentive is given to students in this 
country to strive for scholastic 
honors. 



MEN FOR NURSE MAIDS 

Acting as a nursemaid is the latest 
Way to work your way through col- 
fege. Some 50 students of St. John's 
College at Annapolis, Maryland are 
engaged in this new profession and 
their services are said to be in great 
demand. The usual fee for taking 
c are of baby while mama and papa 
So to a dance or play is one dollar. 

"The Cabinet" 



NOTICE FROSH ! 

Our freshmen may think they have 
I "pretty tough" here, but at the 
diversity of Akron, the Student 
Council has passed recently a disen- 
* r anchisement rule concerning their 
freshmen regulations. The freshmen 
ar e not allowed to vote or hold offit- 
68 if they are found guilty of not 
^earing their caps or of parkinr 
their cars on the campus. 



ALBRIGHT AND SCHUYLKILL 

Merger of Albright College, of 
Myerstown, and Schuylkill College, 
of Reading was approved at Harris- 
burg, last week, by the Boards of 
Trustees of the four Pennsylvania 
Conferences of the Evangelical 
Church. The proposed merger pro- 
vides that the Church college be lo- 
cated at Reading, and that the name 
be Albright College. 



LOCAL QUINTET 

WINS 10— LOSES 8 

(Continued from page 1) 



earlier in the season by a n2-28 tri- 
umph. Drexel was the victim in the 
last game of the season 38-27. 

Only one home game was lost, that 
to Gettysburg 42-41. This is the first 
season a Lebanon Valley team has 
had the benefit of a good floor upon 
which to practice. They showed the 
effects of this by winning a majority 
of their games. 

Piela was the high scorer for the 
season with a total of 257 points. 
Gelbert was runner up with 129, Mil- 
ler third with 73. Albright and 
Wheeler followed with 69 and 60 re- 
spectively. The team will lose cap- 
tain Piersol, Wheeler, Bell and Bru- 
baker through graduation. 



Lane and Edna Gorski; and a group 
of songs led by Janet Miller, sung by 
the Junior girls. 

After the program the girls danced 
and chatted until they were served 
most delicious refreshments by the 
Junior girls. The dining hall was 
prettily decorated in white and green, 
appropriate to the occasion. Every 
one had an enjoyable time and the 
Freshman are fortunate to be able 
to look forward to three more such 
events. 



YALE SENIORS VOTE 

LINDY FIRST PLACE 

NEW HAVEN, Conn., March 26,- 
Seniors at Yale have voted Col. 
Charles A. Lindbrgh first place in 
their list of outstanding world fig- 
ures. Mussolini was second, six 
votes below Lindy. 

Other decisions of the class ballot- 
ing include: 

That prohibition is harmful to col- 
lege life. 

That English is the most valuable 
study and psychology the least. 

That, after Yale, Harvard is the 
favorite university. 



Y.M.— Y.W. OFFICERS 

ARE INSTALLED 

(Continued From Page 1) 



In both the Y. M. and the Y. W. 
there is considerable thought being 
yen bo the annual Eagles Mere con- 
ference of young people, which is 
held almost immediately following; 
the closing of the college year. Last 
year there were nine of the students 
who attended, and there seems to be 
considerable interest already which 
would indicate at least that many 
going again this year. Those attend- 
ing the Eagles Mere conference are 
not at all limited to being Cabinet 
members but any of the student body 
interested in going will be giver, 
consideration. 



SAYS COLLEGES SHOULD TEACH 
Ralph P. Boas, pi-ofessor of Eng- 
lish in Mount Holyoke College, South 
Hadley, Mass., declared to the Grad- 
uate Council assembled there last 
week that the business of college 
professors is to teach young people, 
rather than to make themselves 
specialized masters of some remote 
field of learning, according to a dis- 
patch to the Christian Science Mon- 
itor. 

If professors carried out this policy, 
much of the problem of adjusting col 
leges in the United States to the re- 
quirements of the modern era would 
be solved", Professor Boas declared. 
"Teachers are often more interested 
in their subjects than in their stu- 
dents," he said. Turning to the un- 
dergraduate attitude, Professor Boas 
said: "Too often students don't want 
to learn what the faculty have to 

teach Thy want 120 credits, not a 

full and complete knowledge of some 
branch of academic learning." 



ALL FOR HOOVER 

New York, N. Y. (by New Student 
Service)— Herbert Hoover continues 
as the presidential favorite in the col- 
leges, with Al Smith trailing along 
as outstanding Democratic choice. 
Of 2210 ballots cast at the University 
of Cincinnati, Hoover received 1281, 
which was 58 percent of all votes 
cast, and 75 percent of the Repub- 
lican poll. Smith stood second with 
436 votes, which represented 88 per- 
cent of the Democratic choice. The 
Anti-Saloon League might oe inter-, 
ested to know that Smith's main sup- 
port came from the law college. Here 
Hoover defeated the New York gov- 
ernor by only four votes, whereas in 
the other schools he gathered many 
times the Smith vote. Coolidge and 
Dawes followed the two leaders in 
the order named. Willis did not fare, 
Well with his fellow Ohians, receiving 
only 32 votes. 

At Middlebury College the high 
men were again Hoover and Smith. 
Of 529 votes cast, Hoover received 
357, and Smith 110. Smith's suppo.t 
came mainly from the men. 

On March 19 colleges throughout 
the country took part in a two-day 
straw vote on the presidential pos- 
sibilities. Seventy institutions were 
represented in this first comprehen- 
sive attempt to measure college opin- 
ion on the forthcoming nominations 
Five Republicans and five Democrats 
were named on the ballots, although 
voters were free to write in the 
names of other choices. Those listed 
were: Curtis, Dawes, Hoover, Lowden, 
Willis, Donahey, Reed, Ritchie, Smith 
and Walsh, of Montana. 

Stanford University, which has^, 
high hopes of becoming alma mater 
of a president, will dedicate its 1928 
year book to its most prominent 
alumnus, Herbert Hoover.. 



CHEF'S 



House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Annville 



Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

KODAKS & SUPPLIES, FILMS. 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING-- 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Printing — Publishing 
Advertising 
Annville Penna. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 



THE HUB 



713 Cumberland Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 
QC^ye Forever 

36 North Eighth Street, 



Photographs of Quality 

BLAZIER & MILLER 

LEBANON, PA. 



PAOfi FOUR 



LA VIE OOLLEGIENNE. THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 1928 



EURYDICE APPEARS 

IN HOME CONCERT 

(Continued from page 1) 



audience with her selections "Sol- 
vejg's Lied", "Don't Come in Sir, 
Please, and "Ma Curly Headed 
Bebby." Everyone enjoyed Miss Ap- 
gar's readings and the excellent way 
in which they were given. The club's 
quartet, consisting of Misses Miller, 
Fischer, Bachman and Hess greatly 
pleased the listeners, judging from 
the applause. Their numbers were 
"Sleep Little Baby Sleep", and "Oh 
Golden Sunshine". 

The "operetta", presenting a farci- 
cal scene on the fifth floor of a burn- 
ing apartment house, was popularly 
successfuly. Misses Burrier, Spatz, 
and Strubhar took the "leads", while 
the chorus was composed of Misses 
Haertter, Miller, Fisher, Schlichter, 
Bachman, Miller, Hafer and Hess. 

The entire program was tastefully 
arranged and brilliantly executed. 
Although the audience was but a fair 
size, it thoroughly enjoyed and ap- 
preciated the efforts which the con- 
cert represented. 



GLEE CLUB GIVES 

FIVE CONCERTS 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Greencastle, Pa., also filled its the- 
atre to capacity to hear the club for 
the first time in eight years, in spite 
of the fact that a snowy, slushy even- 
ing had threatened to spoil the at- 
tendance. 

From Greencastle, the club jumped 
to Red Lion, Pa., making a short stop- 
over in York at the Y. M. C. A. 
Swimming furnished the main diver- 
sion until time for dinner. Then the 
cafeteria was a mecca for all the 
lucky holders Of "Y" cards. Afti 
lunch, bowling was enjoyed until the 
time for departure. 

Snow was falling rather lively at 
the time of the concert in Red Lion, 
and the crowd was somewhat small 
on account of that fact. Sunday 
morning the group sang in Sunday 
School and Church. 

Immediately after dinner the club 
left for Baltimore, Md., and gave 
several numbers in the Salem United 
Brethren Church at the evening ser- 
vice. Rev. J. B. Behney, president 
of the club, delivered the sermon of 
the evening on a revival theme. Mon- 
day was spent in viewing the city and 
the program was presented to a large 
crowd in the church during the clos- 
ing hours of the day. 

The final day of the trip was spent 
in Washington, C. Most of the 
members of the club spent the day 
viewing interesting spots, and very 
few were fortunate enough to see 
President Coolidge, although it was 
impossible to get close enough to 
shake hands. 

The program and the trip closed 
about 10 o'clock and a group of re- 
luctant glee club men returned home 
on Wednesday, March 21. Then, after 
a two day rest, a short run to Harris- 
burg was made and the concert given 
in the Edison Junior High School 
there. 

Klinger and Sneath were the arize 
winners on the trip, with Klinger 
taking first prize for his splendid ex- 
hibition in Baltimore. The booby 
award was. given to Sneath, who is 
now awaiting a favorable opportunity 
to pay for everything Sitlinger can 
eat at one sitting. This penalty is 
imposed upon the second prize win- 
ner because of his inability to resist 
the entreating looks of the sweet 
young things exposed to his manly 
charms. 




MEN'S GLEE CLUB, 1928 

(Left to right) Sitting J. M. Horst, pianist; O. P. Bollinger, Bus. Mgr.; 
Prof. Crawford, Director; J. B. Behney, Pres.; R. C. Oyer, Treas. Standing 
J. W. Beattie; F. W. Miller; R. C: Morgan; A: J: Klinger; H: C: Rider; 
A. W. Rearick; J. C. Keene; E. 0. Sneath; J. L. Mentzer; E: A: Wolfe; 
D. J. Edmunds; K. L. Russell. 



CO-EDS END UP 

WITH VICTORY 

(Continued from page 1) 



were the stars for their team. Evans 
and Livingston starred for Juniata. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G F P 

Meyer f 6 12 

Lane f 4 6 14 

J. Miller c u u u 

L Miller sc J 

Cochran g 

Gorski g 

March g 

Freeman g 

Total 10 6 26 

JUNIATA 

G F P 

Dugan f 113 

Musselman f 2 10 

Evans f 6 2 14 

Laing c 

Garrier sc ^ 

Hower sc 

Free g 

Livingston g 

Neff g 

Total 9 4 22 



STAR COURSE NUM- 
BERS ANNOUNCED 

(Continued from page 1) 



Another feature of the program 
will be Sue Hastings' Marionettes. 
These delightful little actors quaintly 
present the most novel and artistic- 
entertainment imaginable. They are 
little wooden figures carefully pro- 
portioned, weighted and jointed so 
as to be capable of making virtually 
all the movements of human beings. 

There will be two Musical numbers, 
but entirely different in content and 
form. The first will be "The Betty 
Booth Concert Company", featuring 
costumed sketches, vocal, piano, and 
violin solos. The outsanding musical 
number will probably be Robert 
Jackson's Four Plantation Singers. 
Mr. Jackson is a graduate of the 
University of Kansas and is head of 
Music department and Dean of .West- 
ern University. He is an authority 
on Negro folk lore and negro music. 
Consequently with these four husky 
Africans he has developed an organi- 
zation notable for its close harmony, 
negro spirituals, plantation scenes, 
southern songs, and plantation melo- 
dies. 

Too much can not be expected 
from these four numbers. 



SOPHOMORE GIRLS 

COME OUT VICTORS 

The girls' annual Soph-Frosh bas- 
ketball game took place Tuesday, 
March 20 in the gym. The Sopho- 
more girls came out victors for their 
second successive year, with a score 
of 32-20. From the beginning every- 
thing went well with the Sophs, but 
both teams kept on "fighting" so 
that it was considered by all to be a 
fast girls game. 

FRESHMEN 

G F .f 

Fisher f 9 9 

Stager f 11 

Thompson f 5 10 

Engle c 

Haertter c 

Bowers c 

Eldridge g 

Le Van g 1 

Total 5 io ::o 

SOPHOMORES 

G F P 

Cochran f 9 5 23 

McCurdy f 2 15 

Keener f 2 - 

Morrow f 2 4 

Knaub f 1 2 

Schlicter f 

Parnell f 

March c 

Weigel c 

Bachman g 

Horst g -1 

Hand g 

Gordon g 

Dyne g 

Total 16 6 38 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET ,ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



TENNIS SCHEDULE 

COMPLETE FOR '28 

(Continued From Page 1) 



other home matches. 

Only one member of the team tast 
year was lost by graduation, and the 
prospects are bright for a winning- 
combination this year. 

The present schedule is:— 
April 21— Gettysburg at Gettysburg. 
April 24— Ursinus at Collegeville. 
May 2— Franklin and Marshall at 
Lancaster. 

May 5— Ursinus at Annville. 
May 12— Dickinson at Carlisle. 
May 17— Moravian at Bethlehem. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

LumLer and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON. 



PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in J 
Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

UNION EMBLEM CO VALLEY trust building 

~_ ., PALMYRA, PA. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS-TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

opposite p. o. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 




BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
aTnTJ™^ S vers ^rp" Pencils, Pennants 

2£ STtt^^ JeweIry > La ™ Ten - 

HARRY W. LIGHT 

43 EAST MAIN STREET, ANNVILLE. PA- 



vo 



PL 



Sat 



M 
eve: 
seer 
cou 
the 
spec 

A 
tain 
afte 
age 
froi 
ane 1 
the 
The 
of g 
cou 
proi 
a vi 
the 
coni 
own 
a gj 

T 



EU 



Gii 



T 
con 
Can 
Mai 
had 
dest 
con 
tori 
the 



FA 



Jers 
C 
new 
bas< 
afte 
gait 
five 
out 
Y 

at 

poli 

the 

iouf 

Cha 

gaii 

gue 

nun 

Rea 

Usu 

fori 

Will 



ti< 
w 
it 
th 
m 
n; 
b« 
bt 



BEST WISHES TO 1TIILO 
FRIDAY, MAY 4 




HEAR THE GLEE CLUB'S 
MAY DAY CONCERT 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1928 



NUMBER 13 



PLANS GO FORWARD FOR NOVEL MAY 

DAY ENTERTAINMENT ON LOCAL CAMPUS 

Saturday Afternoon, May 5, Will Find Visitors From Southern 
Europe Here For Frolic; Prof Sharr of Harrisburg 
Directing College Dancers 



Monte Carlo, the meeting- place of 
every nation in the world will be the 
scene this year of our May Queen's 
court. Her throne will be raised on 
the Riveria, amid the colorful and 
spectacular life of this great resort. 

An international assembly of enter- 
tainers will meet here on Saturday 
afternoon, May, 5, to pay their hom- 
age to the queen. They are coming 
from sunny Italy and France. Jap- 
anese maidens will gaze wistfully at 
the queen from behind painted fans. 
The Dutch are sending us a company 
of girls and boys who will amuse he 
court with their antics. Spain has 
promised us her bravest toreador and 
a vicious bull for him to fight. From 
the motherland of all May Queens are 
coming the May Pole dancers. Our 
own America will be represented oy 
a group of school children. 

The dances in which the college 
(Continued on page 3) 



EURYDICE APPEARS 
IN TWO CONCERTS 

Girls' ChoruiS Presents Its Pro- 
gram In Campbelltown 
And Palmyra 

The Eurydice Choral Club gave a 
concert in the Reformed Church at 
Campbelltown, Wednesday evening. 
March 28. The patrons of the club 
had cars sent to take the girls to their 
destination, and home again. As the 
concert was held in the church audi- 
torium, there was no applause, but 
the audience was appreciative. The 
(Continued on Page 2) 



FAVORABLE REPORTS 

FOLLOWING GELBERT 



Jersey City, N. J., April ?.0. 

Charlie Gelbert, Lebanon Valley^ 
newest representative in professional 
baseball made his debut here this 
afternoon playing for Rochester a- 
gainst the Jersey Skeeters. Out of 
five chances at bat, Charlie banged 
out two hits and scored one run. 

Yesterday, Gelbert also performed 
at shortstop for the New Yorkers, 
poling out three hits in five trips to 
the plate, scoring Hurst after a vic- 
ious drive to center. Incidentally, 
Charlie will play with Rochester a- 
gainst the Reading International lea- 
gue club on April 29 at Reading. A 
number of students will journey to 
Reading to witness the game, as un- 
usual interest has been shown in the 
former L. V. star's bid for a berth 
with the St. Louis Cards. 



PHILO CLOSING ITS 
SIXTY-FIRST YEAR 



'Cyrano de Bergerac" 
Feature Program of 
Friday, May 4 



Will 



On Friday evening, May 4th at 7:30 
o'clock the Philokosmian Literary 
Society will hold its sixty-first An- 
niversary program in the chapel of 
the Engle Conservatory. As the lead- 
ing feature of the program the so- 
ciety will present the play entitled 
"Cyrano de Bergerac" by Edmon.l 
Rostand, translated from the French 
by Gertrude Hall. It is one of the 
leading plays of its period and per- 
haps Rostand's best. The cast is 
working hard under the careful 
supervision of Dr. Paul A. W. Wal- 
lace and will furnish an evening of 
first class entertainment. 

On Wednesday evening, April 18th 
Mrs. Bennett gave a lecture to the 
members of the cast on the history 
and interpretation of the play. In- 
cidentally Mrs. Bennett formerly user! 
"Cyranode Bergerac" in one of her 
French courses. 

As agreed upon by the lour socie- 
(Continued on page 3) 



L, V. OPENS SEASON 
WITpCTORIES 

Schuylkill And Bucknell Are 
First Victims Of Blue 
And White Nine 



NEW QUITTIE STAFF 
HAS BEENCOMPLETED 

Hazelton and Keene Select 
Associates; Engraving 
Contract Let 



ANONYMOUS 

We recently received contribu- 
tions for La Vie Collegienne whic:i 
were unsigned, and for that rea-t^n 
it is impossible for us to publ ! n 
them. Every such contribution is 
most welcome, but although the 
name will not be used, each must 
bear the signature of its author- 
before it may be printed. 



Work has already begun on nerct 
year's Quittie. It has been formerly 
announced that the Sophomore Cla.*? 
elected Jim Hazelton as the Editor- 
in-chief, and Calvin Keene as Busi- 
ness Manager. The complete Editor- 
ial and Business Staff has been se- 
lected and appointed to their tasks. 

Norman Vanderwall is Associate 
Editor; Blanche Cochrane, General 
Secretary; Messrs. Shenk and Bovino 
Artists; Benita Streibig, Sonservtory 
William Meyers, Athletic; John Sny- 
der, Feature; Gladys Knaub, Activity; 
Ruth Cooper, College Dept.; and Ed- 
gar Hertzler, Photographic. The Lit- 
erary Editors are Edgar Shroyer, 
Mary Hartz, and Anne Gordon. On 
the Business Staff working with Mr. 
Keene, are Homer Allwein, Sales 
Manager, and Mary McCurdy, the 
Advertising Manager. 

Next year will be the first time in 
eleven years that the book was not 
engraved and printed by Hammer- 
smith and Kortmeyer. The engrav- 
ing contract has been let to Canton 
Engraving Company, and there are 
several bids out for the printing oj 
the book. Plans are progressing rap- 
idly; the general theme of the book 
is now being decided, and it is ex- 
pected that before the end of the 
year, a dummy lay-out of the whole 
book will be completed. Many new 
and striking features are already 
planned. 



Reading, April 13 — 

Lebanon Valley opened its baseball 
season with a victoiy here this after- 
noon, playing off the game with the 
Schuylkill Lions which was scheduled 
for yesterday. Although the Reading 
collegians threatened in the fourth 
and sixth innings, the visiting club 
emerged victors after an impressive 
showing. 

Zappia held the Schuylkill team to 
ten scattered hits, and, backed by al- 
most faultless fielding, he was able 
to pull the team out of tight pinches. 
A home-run by Radcliffe in the 
fourth inning gave the Reading club 
a start which it was unable to follow 
up, while the visiting aggregation, 
more aggressive throughout, main- 
tained its lead and sealed the game in 
(Continued on page 4) 



KALOZETEANS CELEBRATE THEIR FIFTY-FIRST 
ANNIVERSARY BEFORE LARGE AUDIENCE 

"The Dover Road" Presented By Capable Cast Under The Direc- 
tion Of Miss Mary K. Wallace; Characteristically 
Unique Features For Reception 



KALOS ME 



SENIORS CHOOSE 

ANNUAL PLAY 

Darkes Albright Will Direct 
"The Passing of The Third 
Floor Back" 



The Senior Class is this year es- 
tablishing a custom in regards to the 
rendition of their annual class play 
in that the cast of the production will 
be coached by a capable student 
which Mall permit the Seniors to 
show, the benefit derived from faculty 
coaching and to develop an initative 
in that direction. Last year the Sen- 
iors thought it best to break with the 
custom of staging a class play but the 
present graduating class has decided 
upon this new plan which has been 
sanctioned by the faculty. If success- 
ful, it will be carried on in the fu- 
ture. 

The student ccach, whom the clasf 
of 1928 has chosen, is Darkes Al- 
bright, whose ability along dramatic 
lines is well known. Thursday, May 
24 has been set as the date for the 
presentation of the play. 

The committee, composed of Nelda 
Spa!?;, Darkes Albright and Millard 
(Continued on page 3) 



READERS' CLUB WILL 

STUDY MILNE PLAYS 



The Reader's Club of Lebanon Val- 
ley College will meet at the home ol 
Dr. and Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace to- 
night, Thursday, April 26 at 7:30 
o'clock. The club has set out on a 
study of plays for the remainder of 
the school year. It has studied a 
number of poets and novelists. This 
evening's program will be on A. A. 
Milne and the following plays will 
be reviewed. 

"The Romantic Age" by Leah Har- 
pel "The Truth About Blayds", 
Darkes Albright, "Wurzel Flum- 
mery", Mary McCurdy. 

All Readers Club members are urg- 
ed to pay their dues as soon as pos- 
sible. A large attendence is expected 
for the last few meetings so as to 
keep up the fine record made 
throughout the year. 




Chef's Place Is The Scene Of 
Second Annual Society 
Affair 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 
has esablished a new custom and in- 
stitution in its Annual Alumni Ban- 
quet, the second one of which was 
held on Saturday evening, April 14th, 
at Chef's Place. Nothing bespeaks 
the success of the affair better than 
the many Kalos of former days who 
were present for this gathering and 
fellowship reunion with the Kalos of 
today 

In the large dining hall at Chef's 
Place between sixty-five and seventy 
Kalos from far and wide sat down to 
bant.uet together. There were also v 
few specially invited Faculty mem- 
bers who were Philo. A special and 
pleasing menu was prepared, and 
none of the mathematicians present 
either old or young had the courage 
to calculate or even to approximate 
the number of waffles that were con- 
sumed. 

The toastmaster was Rev. P. B. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



GLEE CLUB WILL 

ENTERTAIN HERE 

New Numbers Are Planned For 
May Day Concert By The 
Men's Organization 



Kalozetean Literary Society ob- 
served its fifty-first anniversary on 
Friday evening, April 13th., with A. 
A. Milne's "The Dover Road" as the 
feature of its program. Quite a large 
number of alumni returned for the 
event and for the Alumni Banquet 
held the next evening at Chef's Place. 
An orchestra of unusual size and cali- 
bre, under the direction of Franklin 
M. Kiehner '26, furnished appropriate 
music both at the program in the 
Conservatory and later at the recep- 
tion in North Hall parlors. 

The first part of the program open- 
ed with the invocation by G. W. Hall- 
man, '17. Kenneth Russell played a 
beautiful solo on the cornet, and this 
was followed by the address of wel- 
come by President Darkes Albright. 
Wesley Carpenter then sang a splen- 
did bass solo. 

The scond part of the anniversary 
(Continued on page 4j 



MRS. GREEN GIVEN 
PLEASING SURPRISE 

W. S. G. A. Tenders The Dean 
A Party On Her Birthday 
Anniversary 



North Hall became the scene of a 
unique celebration sponsored by the 
W. S G. A. in honor of Mrs. Mary C. 
Green's birthday last Thursday even- 
ing. It was different in all respects 
from the usual surprise parties which 
have been tendered her on similar 
occasions. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



The Lebanon Valley College Men's 
Glee Club is busily engaged in re- 
hearsing several numbers for exclu- 
sive rendition at their home concert 
to be given on the evening of May 
Day in Engle Hall. The campus con- 
cert of the glee club is one of LeV« 
anon Valley's major events; an affair 
looked forward to from year to year. 
The group is preparing for a crowd 
which will tax the full capacity of 
the chapel. May Day visitors and 
the town patrons will soon pick out 
the select seats, so students are ad- 
vised to place their orders for tickets 
early. Tickets may be obtained from 
any member of the club, and atten- 
tion is called to the fact that the re- 
served seat chart will open at North 
Hall instead of at Light's Book Store 
on the Thursday before May Day. 

Comments of a most pleasing na- 
ture have been pouring in from all 
places where the Glee Club has given 
its concerts. This year's club is re- 
ported to be the best that was ever 
organized here. The program is com- 
posed of an exceptionally well bal- 
anced musical program together with 
a humorous skit and literary produc- 
tions, all of which make the entei- 
tainment thoroughly enjoyable. 

On Monday, April 16, the club fui- 
nished entertainment for the county 
meeting of the American Legion held 
in the Annville High School audito- 
rium under the auspices of the An i- 
(Continued on Page 3) 



DR. SIDDALL VISITS . 

LOCAL CAMPUS 



Dr. A. C. Siddall of Bonebrake 
Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio 
was a visitor at Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege recently. During his stay he 
spoke in chapel to the students body 
and proved himself to be a very 
jovial fellow. He came primarily to 
interest the ministerial students ol 
the upperclasses in going to Bone- 
brake Theological Seminary. 

Dr. Siddall gave an informal dinner 
to the ministerial students at tne 
Pennway on Friday evening to which 
Dr. Gossard, Dr. Butterwick and Dr. 
Richie were also invited. After the 
dinner he talked on various phases 
of seminary life and answered ques- 
tions asked by the students regarding 
the school. During the day Dr. Sid- 
dall remained in North Hall Parlor 
where he filled many appointments 



FIFTY-ONE 

The Memebers of the Clionia l, 
Delphian and Philo kosmian ;t 
erary societies unite in expressing 
to the members of the Kalozet-» i 
Society their most sincere congrat- 
ulations upon the successful cele- 
bration marking the close of fifty 
one years of activity on our cam- 
pus. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1.928 



4fie 

PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 

JOHN W. BE ATT IE, '29. 
Associate Editors 

CAROL E. BRINSER, '29 MILES S. KIEHNER, % 

General Reporters 

JOHN W. SNYDER, '30 ESTHER ANSTADT, '30 

RUSSELL E. MORGAN, '31 

Conservatory M. ALCESTA SLICHTER, '30 

Athletics NORMAN VANDERWALL, 'Hi 

Clionian _ GLADYS M KNAUB, '30 

Delphian ___ _ RUTH A. STRUBHAR, '2i> 

Kalozetean _ _ - JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

Philokosmian CHARLES H .WISE, '31 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 

L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Associate Business Manager J. CALVIN KEENE, '30 

Circulation Manager HARRY L. HOVIS, '2t 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 

| iwTORIALS J 

INTRODUCING: LA VIE FOR 1928-9 

This, issue is the first of a new regime. The neophyte staff-- 
the campusf new "hopeful" — is made up of folks well known to 
most of us, perhaps, but yet a word of introduction will not be- 
out of place, here. ■ 

The Beattie-Lutz combination will "lead the pack . Seattle, 
who is Editor-in-Chief, takes the place with a wealth of success- 
ful past efforts to recommend him; Lutz, too, who will direct 
the business end, has carried off satisfactorily a long succession 
of society and class affairs. A witty and popular pair of seniors- 
to-be — . Brinser and Kiehner— will assist in the Editing. Al- 
cesta Slichter and Norman Vanderwall, both members of '30.. 
will take up the- conservatory and athletic duties, while Gladys 
Knaub '30, will represent Clio. Ruth Strubhar '29, Charles Wise 
'31, and James Hazleton '30, will be Delphian, Philo, and Kalo 
reporters, respectively. John Snyder '30, Esther Angstadt '30, 
and Russell Morgan '31, general reporters, complete the editorial 
staff. Calvin Keene '30, as Associate Business Manager, and 
Harry Hovis '29, as Circulation Manager, will work with Lutz on 
the business staff. 

"On paper", the staff looks excellent. With "Lot's of luck!" 
from the old staff, and ''Let's go!" from the .student body— 
"They're off" I ! ! 

and so: — 



THE CURTAIN RISES— 

La Vie Collegienne today begins another period in its short, 
but varied and colorful history under the direction of a newly 
organized staff. At the very outset of our work, we wish to 
express most sincere thanks to those who have gone before for 
the firmly laid foundation upon which we may safely continue 
to bu'ild. toward a realization of the ideals incorporated into La 
Vie Collegienne since the time of its introduction to our campus. 
We especially appreciate the assistance of the out-going star! 
in the publication of our initial number. 

The members of the 19218-29 staff stand on the threshhold of 
a year of glorious opportunities. Behind us there is a wealth ol 
outstanding achievements to spur us on; to create within us an 
overpowering desire for even greater success. We stand to- 
gether to face this challenge, and together we cheerfully accept 
its call. 

Once each year on just such an occasion as this, when a new 
staff assumes its duties, there is a large array of new ideas for- 
mulated; a multitude of new plans made, and a galaxy of high 
aims fashioned upon these ideas and plans. But we wish to en- 
compass our projects into a smaller scope. We do not promise 
the student body a paper that is new in any one particular, noi 
in every particular. Rather, it is our firm intention to build 
upon trie materials) at our disposal, and, in our .small way, tc 
help create "A Bigger and Better Lebanon Valley." 

We welcome any suggestions or constructive criticisms which 
might be offered. La Vie Collegienne is a student publication, 
and above all we ask for the loyal co-operation and siipnorl e 
every student on the campus in the publication of their paper. 

CIRCLING THE CAMPUS 

We should like to suggest a more dignified "rush" into the 
dininsr room after the bell has sounded, 



Prof. Shenk recently asked his, History 46 jrroup if they h.'u' 
seeii any drunken men in Annville dtlring their slay in College. 
Has anyone ever seen a drunken MAN? 



"The Bucknellian" inquires why an appropriate sign could 
not be erected to point out l^ucknell to passing autoists. South 
Hall could well be used as a background for a similar sign adver- 
tising Lebanon Valley. 



FEW CHANGES FOUND 
IN NEW CATALOGUE 

Interesting Figures Show A 
Complete Enrollment of 
More Than 700 

No great changes are evident in 
the new catalogue that has recently 
appeared. School will start Septem- 
ber 17, a few days earlier than the 
last few years and will consequently 
close earlier, June 12. Students have 
learned with regret that the tuition 
for next year will again be increased 
by the amount of ten dollars. 

A definite date, Dec. 12, has been 
set for the Junior Class Play. It is 
hoped that this will eliminate the 
overcrowding of activities at one 
time and allow for concentration on 
play. Vacations are to remain much 
the same. A full two-weeks vacation 
will be granted at Christmas. 

The Course in Business Administra- 
tion as outlined in the catalogue, al- 
though a recent innovation, reflects 
much credit on the school. 

Perhaps the portion most interest- 
ing to friends of the school is the 
Summary of the Collegiate Year 1927- 
1928: 

Seniors , 6^ 

Juniors 6'.) 

Sophomores 7? 

Freshmen 111 

Unclassified 9 

Total in College 323 

Conservatory of Music 74 

Summer School 157 

Extension Department 20o 

Total Enrollment in all Depts.__757 
Names repeated in Conservatory 
Music, Summer School and Ex- 
tension 109 

Net Enrollment 648 



CO-EDS MEET TO 

DISCUSS TENNIS 



A meeting of all girls interested in 
tennis was held April 13 to plan fo-- 
an active season of this sport. Inter- 
class matches are to be the new fea- 
ture at L. V. C. and, it is hoped, a 
Girls' Varsity will be built up to 
compete with other colleges. 

There is a possibility that a regular 
schedule can be made. Jerry Hafer, 
who was elected manager last year, 
has already received one offer from 
Ursinus who desire a match to be 
played on their courts. An attempt 
will be made to date Getysburg, Sus- 
quehanna, Juniata and Shippensburg, 
which are known to have Grls' teams, 
as well as several other schools whicn 
will be determined later. 



GETTYSBURG TAKES 

OPENER IN TENNIS 



Gettysburg, April 20: 

The Lebanon Valley College Tennis 
team opened its 1928 season with a 
5 to 1 defeat at the hands of the 
Gettysburg College team here today. 
The Blue and White team did not 
show up as well as was expected, 
Eberly winning a lone match for the 
visitors. Shroyer played well and 
forced Hood to the limit of three sets 
before the contest was decided. In 
the doubles, Rank and Shroyer were 
easy victims for Lauer and Hood, but 
Hertzler and Eberly gave Miller and 
Koch some trouble. The scores: — 
Eberly, 6-6 
Hertzler 4-5 
Shroyer 2-6-3 
Rank 6-4 

Rank, Shroyer 3-2 Lauer, Hood 6-3 
Heitzler, Eberly 4-6-3 

Miller Koch 6-3-6 



Koch 4-3 
Lauer 6-7 
Hood 6-2-6 
Miller 8-6 



LOCAL STUDENTS 

TO GIVE RECITAL 

The pupils of Mrs. Edith Frantz 
Mills, voice teacher of the Conserva- 
tory, will give a recital in Lebanon 
in the early part of May. The pro- 
gram will consist of solos, duets, and 
ensembles. 




'0 wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!' 



—BURNS 



One thing I hate about spring": You can't pick up a paper 
but what you sec some gushings about birds singing and buds 
budding. I wish such founts of slush had to dig garden Lill 
their backs stayed bent. 



What's the difference between a cow chewing her cud and 
a co-ed chewing gum? 

That's easy — the thoughtful look on the cow's face. 



If ignorance is bliss,, who in the happiest person on the 



campus 



It's wonderful to be in a position where you don't have to 
work to get into a positin where you don't have to work. 



"It can't be done." They did it. "You can't do it again." 
They did it again. "You can't keep on doing it." They hit him 
with an axe. 



According to Welker there are no fellows attending Eliza- 
bethtown College. He says that all the students are co-eds. 



West Chester, Penna., Mr. "Moose" Morgan, a popular young 
freshman from Lebanon Valley College, will spend the week-end 
of April 28th here. The "Bean Soup" band will meet the student 
at the station and present him with the key of the city. It is 
undestood that Mr. Morgan comes to see bis sac de l'ouest 
Chester. 



Koch and Emma Meyer were meandering spasmodically in 
a Lancaster Courthouse. A clerk, evidently judging by the at- 
titude of the pair, approached and said: "You are looking for 
marriage license? This way please". 



Prof. Butterwick was recently telling one of his stories in 
Philosophy class. In the course of the narrative he remarked: 
"When the tea kettle boiled over the dop; crawled from under the, 
stove and went out." As he said that, Oyer suddenly got up and 
left the room. To date we have not been able to ascertain 
whether Prof, looked tea-kettle-ish and Oyer felt guilty or wheth- 
er he was just too sleepy to appreciate the story. 



The Editor of the La Vie is at the present time considering 
a new feature for the College paper. The department under 
consideration, is: Advice to the Lovelorn by the Rev. P. Millard 
Slenker. 



A Co-ed may love a boy from the bottom of her heart but 
there is alwaj^s plenty of room at the top for at leasjt one more. 



A lot of Profs, think that passing applies only to football. 



Theodore Roosevelt said a thorough knowledge of the Bible 
was worth more than a college education. A thorough know- 
ledge of anything is worth more than a college education. 



Fis;h with hands have been discovered in the South Seas. 
These, it is believed, were developed telling other fish how big 
the fellow was from whom they got away. 



Life is a game of cards in which the queen takes the jack. 



The world is divided into two zones: The male and female. 
The male zone is temperate, intemperate or drunk. The female 
is frigid, horrid, or torrid. 



The laziest animals we know of are oysters). They are al- 
ways found lying in beds. 



EURYDICE APPEARS 

IN TWO CONCERTS 

(Continued from Page 1) 



novelty which was an imitation of 
grand opera, was especially well liked. 
The setting was a burning appartmenl 
house, the words of the "opera" suit- 
ing the occasion. The music was 
taken directly from the grand operas, 
chiofly Gounod's "Faust", and acting 
was cleverly done in grand opera 
style. This quaint mixture made a 
very humorous and interesting pre- 
sentation. The more serious parts of 



the program, all of which were the 
same as had been given in the home 
concert several weeks ago, were well 
liked also. 

The club gave another concert or 
Tuesday evening, April 24, at Palmyra 
in the Parish House of the Lutheran 
Church. The club sang to a very 
large audience. The chorus selection, 
"Reve Anglique" by Rubinstein, was 
an outstanding number. The quartet 
composed of four me'mbers of the 
chorus, was also highly praised. 

There are several more concerts 
scheduled for this season, including 
Minersville and Middlotown. 



PL 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE/ THURSDAY, APRIL 2$ 1928 



PAGE THREE 



PLANS GO FORWARD 
FOR NOVEL MAY DAY 
ENTERTAINMENT ON 
LOCAL CAMPUS 

(Continued from page 1) 



students are taking part, are undei 
the direction of Prof.. Sharr of 
Harrisburg, who has trained many 
people for the professional stage. The 
school children in the American 
group are being selected from the 
first, second, and third grades of the 
Annville public school. Miss Oyer, 
a teacher in the Annville school has 
entire charge of their dances. 

Preparations are in full swing for 
the gayest May Day pagent that this 
campus has ever seen. Prof. Sharr 
has already met twice with each of 
the dancing groups and all dances 
are being rehearsed every night. The 
seamstresses are busy in the dormi- 
tories pricking their fingers and sew- 
ing seams.. Plans by the decorators, 
are being laid for artistic decorations 
and a gorgeous throne. 

We all want to see this the BEST 
May Day. To make it that, each one 
must contribute something. Let us 
make that contribution our generous 
and willing service. 

The following committees and chai"- 
men have been appointed and already 
started work: Entertainment, Ann 
Apgar, Miss Wallace, Adviser; Decor- 
ation, Kathryn Bork; Costumes, Janet 
Miller, Mme. Green, Advisor; Plat- 
form and Grounds, Harry Hovis, Dr. 
Wagner, Adviser; Finance, Henry 
Aungst, Dr. Bennett, Adviser; Pro- 
gram and Tickets, Miles Kiehner: 
Processional, Walter Pugh; Refresh- 
ments, Ruth Cooper. 



KALOS MEET IN 

ALUMNI BANQUET 

(Continued From Page 1) 



Gibble and in his versatile manner 
he conducted the program with life 
and spice. Mr. Shroyer '30 opened 
the program with a selection on the 
piano. Then Rev. D. E. Young gave 
an interesting toast on "Heads". The 
second speaker was G. C. Bair who 
talked on "Straight Lines". Prof. 
Derickson, one of the loyal Kalo 
members gave a spirited talk on 
"Changes". Everyone arose when the 
next speaker was announced, for "t 
was Mr. Garman, the first President 
of Kalo. Fifty one years ago he spoke 
at the first anniversary. There was 
something about the strong but tou<"-h- 
ing tone of his few remarks which 
impressed his hearers. Among other 
things he said: "Last year, at the 
First Annual Banquet, I made a re 
solve that I would be present at the 
100th. anniversary of Kalo. But I'm 
beginning to have my doubts. I guess 
a lot of you young fellows- are saying 
to yourselves 'that old geezer is lucky 
to be still alive'." 

Prof. Paul A. W. Wallace, made e 
peppy toast, using many limericks. 
Mr. A. K. Mills, a well known Kalo 
together with some serious remarks 
pulled a few personal jokes that 
brought down the house. Dr. Reuben 
Williams, a Kalo of Philadelphia 
elucidated on "Human Nature". The 
hist sf>eaker on the program was Dr 
Gossard who proved himself quite 
a dept at repartee. 

The spirit of the whole evening 
was one of fellowship, a fellowship 
that was more than just a jolly time 
It was a fellowship that got into the 
spirit and blood. It established anew 
the kinship between the Kalos of 
ttiany long years. And through this 
deeper spirit of Kalo there was felt 
a deeper spirit of Lebanon Valley. 
It has been repeatedly expressed that 
ln the course of years this new insti- 
tution of the Annual Alumni Banquet 
will grow to be one of the greatest 
e vents of the whole year, particularly 
f or the Kalo side of the Campus. 




PHILOKOSMIAN 

At a special meeting, Monday, 
April 23, Philo elected the following 
officers: President, D. Pugh; vice- 
Presnlent, H. Rider; Recording Sec- 
retary, L. Weber; Corresponding Sec- 
retary R. Harris; Treasurer, A. Su- 
linger; Chaplain, M. Miller; Pianist 
W. Lebo; editor, C. Wise; Critic. S. 
Meyer; Janitors, L. Paul, L. Daub, 
H. Hoy; Chairman Executive Com- 
mittee, P. Barnhart. 

In their last meeting before the 
Easter vacation, Philos were treated 
to a pleasing mixture of literary tal- 
ent and humorous discussions. Oyer 
tried to discover "What Kind of a 
Society Our Society would be if All 
Members were Like Me", and Sneath 
led those present in a search for "Our 
Resolutions" trying to learn "What 
Became of Them". Rider had as h - L 
searching subject "What Has Become 
of Our Piano?'" while Hunter at- 
tempted to size up the society by 
"Service, the Yardstick by which all 
Greatness is Measured." Klinger's 
well known success with the Glee 
Club led him to declare, 'MeFor The 
Glee Club Forever!" Kohler's criti- 
cal remarks closed the program. 

Friday evening, April 20 found 
Zwally in a very retrospective mood 
and he discussed the "Defects of Our 
Present Year." Pugh, however, took 
a forward view and made "Resolu- 
tions for Next Year." W. Meyers 
made his confessions under the title, 
"Why I Joined a Society", after 
which Lebo pleased the assembled 
group with his cornet solo. 

Carl Snavely, coach of the Buck- 
nell athletic team, a graduate of ^he 
college and an ex-Philo, was present 
at this meeting and he offered quite 
an interesting speech which was ap- 
preciated by everyone. 

MRS. GREEN GIVEN 

PLEASING SURPRISE 

(Continued from Page 1) 



All the guests assembled in the par- 
lor, and Miss Burrier ?.n touching 
words recognized "the debt we owe" 
to our Dean, after which she present- 
ed as a token of the girls' apprecia- 
tion, a pin and pendant, both of 
aquamarine stones with filagree sett- 
ing in white gold. At the same time. 
Mrs. Green received a large boquet 
of pink roses from Mrs. G. D. Goss- 
ard and Miss Minnie Gossard who 
were present. 

The curtains between the parlor 
and the dining room were drawn 
back and everyone was quite amazed 
at the appearance of the uom. The 
tables were arranged in true banquet 
fashion. In the center of them was 
an immense cake with blue and while 
candles, which together with the blue 
white crepe paper had transformed 
the entire hall into a cozy "Blue and 
White" room. Pauline Schaeffer gave 
an original toast and the guests weie 
seated, covers having been laid for 
seventy-five banqueteers. 

One of the items which extinguish- 
ed the affair from previous birthday 
parties was that the program was 
given between courses. Miss Thome- 
son, as head waitress, ably supervised 
her Freshmen assistants, who were 
dressed in blue and white. The fol- 
lowing program interspersed the 
menu: 

Vocal selections, "A Kiss in tie 
Rain," by Schnecker; "Evening Song," 
by Gilberte, Miss Spatz; vocal selec- 
tions, "Oh Golden Sunshine," and 
"Roses of Picardy," by A quartette 
composed of Misses Miller, Fisher, 
Bachman and Hess; reading, "My 
Father Can Lick Your Father" Mi* 
Rife; violin solo, " Celebrated Min- 
uet", by Boccherini, Miss 
"Alma Mater," everybody. 



Slichter; 



CLIONIAN 

As the month of May draws near 
Clio's thoughts are turned to formu- 
lating plans for a circus. At the 
business meeting on Friday, April ?0, 
the president appointed all commit- 
tees for the Circus which will be held 
in the middle of May. An open dis- 
cussion was held concerning the com- 
ing event and many new suggestions 
were received. 

Clionians on March 30 were taken 
into the real spirit of this season of 
the year when they were treated to 
a program embodying Easter and 
April Fool events. 

Madeline Rife began with a talk on 
the meaning of Easter after which 
choice bits of Easter music were play- 
ed and sung by Misses Slichter, Millei 
and Peter. Ruby Ann See then added 
much color to the affair oy a clever 
visit of the Easter Bunny. 

The more serious subjects of the 
evening having been mastered, every- 
body felt more comfortable when 
"April Fool's Day'" assumed full sway! 
Mildred Say lor started things going 
by "tickling the ivories" in an ex- 
tremely foolish composition. Clioni- 
ans had no doubt in their minds as to 
who the L. V. fools might be after 
Alice Forman humorously called the 
roll. The entire audience was a vic- 
tim of the prevailing spell when Haz- 
el Baily assuming a fool's role, servxl 
"April Nuts" to all. "April Caprices" 
by Nelda Spatz put everybody on 
their guard for April 1 and ended a 
night of enjoyment and frolic for 
Clionians. 

The spirit of the afternoon game 
between Bucknell and L. V. was car- 
ried from the athletic field into Clio's 
portals on Friday evening, April 20 
when a "Baseball" program was given 
The "Diamond" was laid as a working 
hypothesis by the chaplain after 
which the "Scoreboard" was erected 
by Dorothy Eldridge. A novel fea- 
ture of the program followed when 
Corinne Dyne ushered the "Bags ' on ! 
the scene. The "Batteries" for the 
occasion were Pauline Sehaffer and 
Olive Marrow while the "Fielders" 
were Misses Snoke and Spatz. Aftei 
the services of Emma Schaeffer were 
engaged as "Umpire", Clionians wit- 
nessed an interesting game. 



PHILO CLOSING ITS 

SIXTY-FIRST YEAF 

(Continued from page 1) 



ties on the campus, Philo will follow 
the new custom .of holding the re- 
ception in North Hall. The various 
committees are working enthusiastic- 
ally to make this anniversary a mem- 
orable event of the year. 

The following are in charge of 
anniversary events: Costume and 
play, Behney, Snyder, Flinchbaugh; 
Seating, Pugh and Zwally; Stage: 
Horst, Kuhn, Oyer, W. Meyers; Dec- 
oration: Sheetz, Sitlinger, Sneath 
KUnger, Hunter, A. Dohner, P. Doh- 
ner; Refreshment and Social: M. Mill- 
tr, Rearick, Martin, Barr, Slenker: 
Invitation: Meyer, Beattie, Keene; 
Favors: Kohler, Nitrauer, Barnhart: 
Program and Orchestra: Knisley, 
Wallace, Rank. 

As the following day ?s May Day, 
Philo expects many of its "old grads" 
back for the anniversary. 



SENIORS CHOOSE 

ANNUAL PLAY 

(Continued from page 1) 



Miller, has chosen "The Passing of 
the Third Floor Back" by Jerome K. 
Jerome as the last drama to be pre- 
sented this year. In selecting the 
plays thus far for this year's pre- 
sentation the various organizations 
have tried to preserve a balance of 
the different types. Maintaining this 
idea, as well as because of its own 



DELPHIAN 

A regular literary session of Del- 
phian Literary Society was held on 
Friday evening, April 20, at 7:30. 
The program consisted of two parts, 
the first including the following num- 
bers:— Devotions by the chaplain 
Dorothy Heister; Selections of popu- 
lar musical numbers by the "comb" 
Symphony Orchestra which included 
Dorothy Boyer, Katherine Bowers 
Ruth Krout and Lillian Barber; and a 
group of selected poems, read b r 
Sarah Ensminger. 

In the second part of the program 
was given a one act play "The Medi- 
cine Show" by Stuart Walker under 
the direction of Janet Miller. Then- 
were three characters in it, "Lut'er ' 
as represented by Ruth Strubhai, 
"Giz ', Mae Hamer, and "Dr. Steven." 
Mary Elizabeth Engle. The play, 
while it did not have much plot, took 
its merit in the characterization and 
atmosphere. 



CHEFS 
House of Good Food 



KALOZETEAN 

At the program of the regular lit- 
erary session of Kalo last Friday 
evening a "Post- Mortem" was made 
of the Anniversary and Banquet. It 
was, largely, a burlesque on the dif- 
ferent divisions of the anniversary. 
Bruno elucidated on "Favors", then 
Aungst told the wonders of "Make- 
up", and incidentally he has had 
some real experience along that line 
as indicated by the black glasses he 
has been wearing. Noll gave a re- 
production of the fine music and 
George Becker (alias 1 "Cawker") dip- 
ped deep into the mysteries of 
"Punch". The last number was by 
Morgan who, as a new Kalo, spoke on 
the "Banquet" and in a serious way 
told how it endowed him with a new 
spirit of Kalo. 



merits, the committee selected this 
work of Jerome. 

The cast is composed of twelve 
characters equally distributed be- 
tween the males and fmales. The 
roles will be picked after the tryouts 
to oe held in a few days. 



GLEE CLUB WTLL 

ENTERTAIN HERE 

(Continued from Page 1) 



ville Post American Legion. Several 
of the regular concert numbers we:e 
given which were very much appre- 
ciated. After the program, the cluo' 
members were served a lunch at the 
Legion home; 

Several members of the club also 
made a trip to Lebanon on Tuesday 
evening, April 17, when they parti- 
cipated in a program given by the 
North-East Parent Teacher's Associa- 
tion at the Mifflin School. • Here, also 
several of the popular numbers were 
given along with the skit. At a re- 
cent meeting of the club, it was de- 
cided that advantage should be taken 
of the remaining five concert tnp> 
that are allowed. 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville _ _ _ _ _ Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

KODAKS & SUPPLIES, FILMS. 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING-- 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Printing- — Publishing 
Advertising 
Annville Penna. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 

THE HUB 



713 Cumberland Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



Photographs ni r^r p i s °. f .?r. iity 
^eForever BLAZIER & MILLER 



36 North Eighth Street, 



LEBANON. PA. 



I 



FAGK FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1928 



Y.W.-Y.M.C.A Notes 



"World-Wide Y" was the interest- 
ing topic discussed at the meeting on 
Sunday night of the Y.W.C.A with 
Madeline Rife as leader. 

Articles were read which showed 
the work of the "Y" outside our snug 
Y.W.C.A. homes in American cities. 
On the Indian reservations of Arizona 
and New Mexico are many workers 
of the Blue Triangle preparing Indian 
girls to fit into the white man's world. 
Along the Pacific coast the "Y" is 
woiking among the Japanese and 
Chinese girls. The girls are not only 
shown the Christian way of living, 
but the workers of the "Y" help 
them also to find worthwhile employ- 
ment. Many of the girls are spared 
lives of immorality through the sur- 
veillance which the "Y" women keep 
ove* them, for many of their own 
countrymen are anxious to entice 
them into evil environments. 

Two musical numbers added to the 
enjoyment of the meeting. The girls' 
quartette sang and Olive Weigle 
played a piano solo. 



L. V. OPENS SEASON 

WITH VICTORIES 

(Continued from page 1) 



the same stanza. Stolen bases by 
Bendigo, Abrahams, Disney and 
Wentz and a triple by Albright fea- 
tured the Blue and White attack. 
The score: — 

LEBANON VALLEY 

ab r lb po a e 

Disney, 2b 6 2 3 6 5 

Albright, cf 5 2 2 1 

Wentz, ss 5 2 4 6 4 

Piersol, lb 5 1 9 

Bendigo, c 5 2 5 1 

Pie'.a, If 4 1 

Zappia, p 3 4 

Abrahams, rf 5 110 

Jacks, 3b 3 11110 



LEBANON VALLEY 

ab r lb po a e 

Disney, 2b 3 2 1 2 3 

Albright, cf 4 12 10 

Wentz, ss 4 114 2 

Bendigo, c 3 1 10 

Piersol, lb 5 1 6 

Piela, p 4 1110 

Zappia, rf 2 112 

Abrahams, If 1 

Jacks, 3b 2 2 1 2 

Snyder, rf 1 



Alumni Notes 



1 



Totals 41 8 14 27 16 1 

SCHUYLKILL 

ab r lb po a e 

Kulp, 3b 1 

Henlsinson, 3b 2 

Knorv. 2b 4 3 2 3 

Roth, ss 5 1 2 1 

Rackliffe, rf 5 2 4 1 

White, If 4 1 2 1 ( 

Grant, cf 3 1 1 ( 

Boyle, lb 4 10 

Snader, c 3 11 1 

Yetzer, p 4 110 2 



Born! twins to Mr. and Mrs. H 
Lloyd Miller on April 13, 1928 at 18^ 
Gariield Place, Maplewood, New Je>- 
sey. Mrs. Miller was formerly Miss 
Grace Dietz, a graduate of Lebanon 
Valley of the class of 1921 and Mr. 
Miller graduated in the class of 1920. 
The names of the newly born ars 
Donald Berne and Doris Jean. 



Faculty 



Professor S. O. Grimm left Mon- 
day, April 16 to attend a conference 
of Collegiate Registrars, held in 
Cleveland under the auspices of the 
Western Reserve University. The 
purpose of the conference is the dis- 
cussion of problems of acute inter- 
est to registrars of the leading Ameii 
cn colleges and Universities. It will 
be in session for a week. 



Prof, and Mrs. Wallace, Prof, and 
Mrs. Bennett, and Prof. Stokes mo- 
tored to Toronto, Canada, for thei 
Easter vacation. They left Annville 
at noon on the last day of school and 
drove as far as Bath, New York, 
where they spent the night. On 
Thursday they motored on to Tor 
ont>. Their route, which covered 
450 miles each way, led past Niagara 
Falls on the Canadian side. They 
state that even at this late date the 
Niagara River above the Falls was 
etill clogged with ice, 



.32 6 10 27 10 . 



Totals 

Stolen bases, Bendigo, Abrahams; 
Disney; Wentz (2); Two base hits 
Wentz; Knorr; Radcliffe, White; 
Three base hits, Albright, White 
Home runs, Radcliffe; Double plays 
Disney to Piersol; Struck out, by Zap 
pia 5, by Yetzer 11; bases on balls, 
off Zappia 9, off Yetzer 5; Time of 
game 2% hours; umpire, Butler. 



Totals 29 8 7 27 6 2 

Stolen bases, Abrahams, Bendigo, 
Wentz; Sacrifice hits, Albright, Zap- 
pia; Two base hits, Albright, Jones. 
McCormick 2; Three base hits, Al 
bright, McCormick; Home run, Jones; 
Double Plays, Disney to Piersol. 
Struck out, by Piela 10; by Thomas 
5; Bases on balls, off Piela 6, off 
Thomas 10; Time of game 2 hrs. b • 
min. Umpire Gallagher. 

Rain forced a postponement of two 
baseball games scheduled to be play- 
ed on the home diamond and depriv- 
ed local fans of those opportunities 
to see the Mylinmen in action. Th<^ 
Juniata game, arranged for Saturd y 
April 14 and the Gettysburg contest, 
scheduled for Saturday, April 21, 
were called (|T. No definite arrange- 
ment has as yet been made for the 
playing of these games, but it is 
hoped that a satisfactory date can be 
selected. 



Mrs. Mary C. Green and daughter 
Yvonne, '24 were recent week-end 
guests of Mr. Edward Johnson and 
his daughter Fiorenzina in their New 
York home. The Johnsons and 
Greens have been friends for many 
years, having met on foreign shores 
Mr. Johnson is one of America's most 
famous tenors in the concert and 
operatic field to-day. "Tosca", "Ro- 
meo and Juliet", and "Lohengrin" are 
some of his most noted operas. The 
Greens had the pleasure of hearing 
Mr. Johnson sing on Saturday after- 
noon, April 14 at he Metropolitan 
Opera House in his closing perfor- 
mance, "The King's Henchman". 



Following the lead of nearly every 
college in the state of Ohio, Oebrlin 
College has abolished team captaincy 
in sports. The system of the selec- 
tion of acting captains for each con- 
test will be followed and an honorary 
captain will be selected at the close 
of the season. 



Annville, April 20: — 

Lebanon Valley scored its seconc 
victory of the season by winning i 
loosely played game from Bucknell to 
the tune of 8-6. The game was u i- 
usually slow and tho a few interesting 
plays added some zest to the perfor- 
mance, neither team appeared to be 
up to its regular standard. 

Albright opened the attack for the 
locals by poking out a smashing trip- 
le to left field, while a sacrifice by 
Wentz turned Albright's drive into 
the first tally of the game. The sec 
ond inning was equally interesting 
for L. V. fans, the local club increas- 
ing the lead to three runs; in this 
stanza, Albright got a double, but 
Abrahams and Jacks did the scoring. 
In the- third Bucknell showed promise, 
but later innings proved this to b» 
merely a momentary spurt. Walks 
issued to Disney and Bendigo, practi- 
cally sewed up the game for L. V. h. 
the fourth, while Bucknell, with iU 
only other two runs scored in the 
sixth and ninth, foundered in a flood 
of walks, strikeouts and putouts. Li 
the fifth, L. V. again wielded the 
big stick and made the outcome final. 
Restelli, James, Jones and McCormick 
played well for the visitors. Jones 
coming through with a home-run in 
what appeared to be the final spuit. 

The students and townsfolk who 
witnessed the game were somewhat 
disappointed in the showing of 
Snavely's Up-State understudies. In- 
terest was shown in the game because 
of the fact that Snavely was a for- 
mer Lebanon Valley man. 

The box score: — 

BUCKNELL 

ab r lb po a e 

Restelli, rf 5 1110 

Hadly, lb 5 1 1 11 

Jones, cf 3 112 

Jones, ss 4 2 6 

Halick, If 5 

Hambacker, 2b 3 1 4 3 o 

McCormick, 3b 4 2 4 1 

Quinn, c 3 5 1 

Thomas.p 4 2 1 

Mitchell 1 



KALOZETEANS CELE- 
BRATE THEIR FIFTY- 
FIRST ANNIVERSARY 
BEFORE LARGE AUDIENCE 

(Continued from Page 1) 



entertainment was the play, under 
the able direction of Miss Mary Kath- 
ryn Wallace of the English Depart- 
ment.. In striking contrast with the 
play of last year, "The Bill of Di 
vorcement" was the light and absurd 
comedy presented this year, "The 
Dover Road". The play was full of 
laughs and presented many ridiculous 
situations in the plot. The boys of 
Kalo were ably assisted in the cast by 
Miss Elizabeth Matthes and Miss 
Benetta Burrier. Miss Matthes took 
the part of Anne who was running 
away with Leonard to the South of 
France where they were "to be happ;, 
ever after". Miss Burlier took che 
part of Eustasia, the wife of Leonard 
and she was alo running away with 
Nicholas "to be happy ever after." 
Both of these parts were wonderfully 
acted. 

Henry Aungst again proved his 
ability as an actor by the easy man 
ner in which he fitted into the part of 
the suave old bachelor Latimer. He 
showed no evidence of self-conscious 
ness. The remarkable versatility ot 
Darkes Albright has been cropping 
out repeatedly in every activity 
through the past years. In dramatics 
he has been particularily active, and 
he interpreted most vividly the part 
of Leonard, the married man of the 
second chance. 

The part of ever-present Dominic, 



major-domo of the "kind of hotel" 
along the Dover road was acted by 
Norman Vanderwall. Mr. Vanderwall, 
like last year, conducted himself 
splendidly. David Edmunds, perhaps 
the least self-conscious of all the cast, 
played the part of Nicholas, the run- 
away man who was always fond of 
saying "No thank you, Eustasia." 
Joseph and Jacob, men-in-waiting, 
were represented by Allison Mayhew 
and Kenneth Russell, respectively. 

Following the new custom estab- 
lished this year, the reception was 
held in North Hall parlors. The 
Cress-Haven Orchestra played sev- 
eral numbers of excellent music at 
the general reception. A very dis- 
tinctive feature of the reception was 
the nature of the refreshments. Gold 
colored ice cream inlaid with the 
maroon letter "Kappa" was served 
on plates with doilies bearing the 
Society insignia. The cake was made 
in the society colors, and the napkins 
bore the insignia also. 

Mr. L. Archie Lutz was largely re- 
sponsible for the great success of the 
whole Anniversary. Mr. Lutz was 
the General Anniversary Chairman, 
and he gave freely of his time and 
effort. Mr. Palmer Poff as chairman 
of the Banquet Committee succeeded 
in this important part of the anniver- 
sary, and through his efforts a large 
representation of the alumni were 
present. Everyone has spoken well 
of the music which was secured by 
Mr. Miles Kiehner as Chairman of 
the Music Committee. Special credit 
should also be given to Mr. Derickson 
for his original ideas in the refresh- 
ments, for he was chairman of that 
part of the Anniversary. The othei 
chairmen were: Invitations, Joseph 
Bruno; Program and Tickets, W. E. 
Waggoner; Property, Norman Van- 
derwall; Decoration, H. L. Hovis; 
Alumni D. Calabrese; and Favor, 
Rajmond Koch. 

The handsome stage properties 
were by the courtesy of Kreamer 
Brothers. The kindness of this local 
business firm was a very appreciable 
factor in the production of the play. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



Totals 37 6 8 24 9 1 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Luml^r and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 

UNION EMBLEM CO palmyra, pa. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS— TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



HOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE. P*- 



\ 



WATCH 
"THE BIG PARADE' 
TO 

"THE CIRCUS" 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SUPPORT 
HOME BASEBALL GAMES 
AND 

SPRING RECITALS 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, MAY 10, 192* 



NUMBER m 



EAST MEETS WEST BEFORE THE THRONE 

OF THE QUE EN OF M AY AT MONTE CARLO 

Scene Of Local Celebration Laid in Picturesque European 
Setting With All Nations Sending Entertainers 
For Queen Frances Long 



Though East is East and West is 
West, the twain did meet on May Day, 
Saturday, May 5, in a brilliant pag- 
eant of nations before our May Queen, 
Frances Long, who was holding her 
court in Monte Carlo. 

The May Queen, glorious in a gown 
of white lace with satin -shimmering 
through its delicate meshes, her maid 
of honor, Jerry Hafer, splendid in a 
fluffy creation of pink organdy, and 
the queen's attendants in dresses of 
paled rainbow hues were Mother Na- 
ture's contribution to the May Day 
before whom the nations of the East 
and of the West met in a spirit of 
good will and happiness. After the 
procession of the queen and her re- 
tinue led by the heralds, across the 
campus to the throne, the Master of 
Ceremonies, Darkes Albright, official- 
ly inaugurated the spirit of good will 
between the Orient and the Occident 
and introduced the bearers of gifts to 
the queen. One subject presented to 
the queen a crown of roses, another 
a sceptre of daisies, a third a foot- 
stool of daffodils and a fourth a min- 
iature world of violets. Thus invest- 
ed with power over the abandonment 
and joy of May, the queen addressed 
(Continued on Page 2) 



GLEE CLUB PRESENTS 
A PLEASING CONCERT 

Men's Organization Rounds Out 
A Successful Season With 
Home Appearance 



What is reputed to be the best con- 
cert ever produced by the Men's 
Glee Club of the College was given 
before a crowded house in the Eagle 
Conservatory on Saturday evening, 
May 5. The event was a fitting cli- 
max to the picturesque activities of 
May Day, the program fulfilling the 
expectations of the most fastidious. 
Two new numbers were sung: "That 
Wonderful Mother of Mine" by Hag- 
and Goodwin, and "The Broken 
Melody" by Sibelius. The latter nam-, 
ber was this year's selection for the 
Intercollegiate Glee Club contest. 
Among the other high points of the 
program were Russell's cornet solos 
which went over with their usual 
zest; Carpenter's vocal solos, and the 
sketch. 

The members of the club wore the 
school colors and white roses, both 
ft which were innovations for the 
home concert and which added color 
to the affair. The home concert had 
been looked forward to since the be- 
ginning of the season as the apex of 
the 1927-28 career. Not having any 
taxing concert work for several 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace has re- 
sumed his work after being confined 
to his home for several days by a 
severe cold. 



CHANGES MADE IN 
1928-29 FACULTY 

History Department Will Be 
Enlarged; Bennetts 
Leaving 

Three new professors, all of whom 
have attained prestige in the scholas- 
tic world, will be added to our facul- 
ty in September. 

Dr. Eugene Stevenson, the son of a 
Methodist minister, will have the chair 
in the department of History. For 
three years he held one of the cov- 
eted Rhodes Scholarships at Oxford 
University, Oxford, England. This is 
one of the greatest scholastic honors 
to be attained in the United States. 
In June he will receive his Ph.D. in 
History at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. He has had previous college 
teaching experience and this year has 
been teaching part time at Muhlen- 
berg College, AllentOwn. Dr. Steven- 
son will devote his entire time here 
to teaching History. 

A leave of absence has been granted 
to Dr. and Mme. Bennett for one 
year. They will go to the University 
of Wisconsin in September, where Dr. 
Bennett will substitute one year for 
the head of the department of Latin. 
Mme. Bennett is planning to study at 
the university. They will resume their 
positions on the L. V. faculty in Sep- 
tember 1929. 

Dr. and Mme. Bennett have been at 
this college six years and in that time 
have made many friends among the 
students. We wish the best of luck 
and success to the Bennetts in their 
plans. Although we all regret their 
leaving, we are glad, nevertheless, 
that their departure is only temporary 
and shall be happy to welcome them 
back to this college a year hence. 

The vacancy occurring for one year 
in the Latin Department will be filled 
by Professor Donald Eugene Fields. 
Prof. Fields is one of our own grad- 
(Continued on Page 3) 



NEW QUITTIES DUE 

WITHIN SHORT TIME 



The campus is expectantly waiting 
for the appearance of the 1929 Quit- 
tie. The Editor, Miles Kiehner, and 
his efficient staff, have labored hard 
to make the book the best yet pub- 
lished. It was hoped to have the 
Quitties out by May Day since the 
"dummies" were completed earlier 
than usual. However, the year 
books will probably be on sale the 
second or third week in May. Every- 
one should be prompt in claiming his 
"Quittie" since only a limited number 
were ordered, and those books not 
claimed within a specified time will 
be sold as extras. 

The Sales Campaign, put on by 
Wayne Sparrow, Sales Manager, and 
Archie L u t z, Business Manager, 
proved very successful. 



L. V. LOSES THREE; 
WIN AND TIE ALSO 

Lafayette and Villanova Set 
Back Blue and White; 
Ursinus Tie 



Easton, Pa., April 25. 

The Blue and White dropped its first 
game of the season here today to La- 
fayette College. After Albright's 
home run in the first innin,g L. V. 
could not pass off its bingles into 
runs at critical moments, even tho 
the Lafaytte nine drove out only four 
safeties to the visitor's five. 

Albright's exhibition in the first pro- 
mised fair for L. V. as did a threat in 
the second inning, which, went up in 
smoke when Piela was tagged by a 
throw from Keaser to Shellenberger, 
and Jacks was caught when trying for 
second. In the following stanzas Mur- 
burg tightened up and a two-bagger by 
Disney, several walks and a number of 
flies were all the Annville Collegians 
could show for the remaining seven 
innings. Lafayette launched its first 
drive in the third when a walk issued 
to Wilson and a safety by Koch on 
Piersol's error were clouted into runs 
by Shellenberger's and Pursell's singl- 
es. Another run originating from a 
walk in the fifth boosted the total to 
three, dimming Lebanon Valley's 
hopes. The remaining innings saw no 
(Continued on page 4) 



"CYRANO DE BERGERAC" DRAMATIZED BY 

PHILO CAST IN ANNUAL CELEBRATION 

Famousi French Play Features The Sixty-First Anniversary 
Program On The Eve Of May Day Festivities 
Usual Reception Follows 



SENIORS ARE GIVEN 

THE CARNEGIE TEST 



On May 7 and 8, the Seniors of Leb- 
anon Valley College were tested on 
general educational achievments as a 
result of their work in school and col 
lege. The examination was given un- 
der the direction of the Carnegie Foun- 
dation to all candidates for bachelor's 
degrees throughout Pennsylvania col- 
leges and universities. 

The purpose underlying the test was 
to learn what the bachelor's degree 
representing an eight year high school 
and college education, amounts to, 
first, of clear, available, important 
ideas and, second, of ability to dis- 
criminate exactly among ideas and 
to use them accurately in thinking. 
The measurement of these abilities 
among college seniors corresponded 
exactly with the tests given at the 
same time and for the same purpose 
to 40,000 seniors in Pennsylvania high 
schools. 

The test was organized in a manner 
which presented knowledge in certain 
definite relationships and every sub- 
ject was thoroughly covered. The 
score made in the test will not affect 
the student's local rating, but the posi- 
tion of Lebanon Valley will be deter- 
mined by the relation which the scores 
of its students bear to the average for 
the state. 



CONGRATULATIONS! 

The members of the Clionian, 
Delphian, and Kalozetean Lit- 
erary societies join in an ex- 
pression of heartiest congratu- 
lations for the members of the 
Philokosmian society upon the 
very successful celebration of 
their sixty-first birthday anni- 
versary. 



PLANS BEING MADE 
FOR COMMENCEMENT 

Dr. Louis K. Anspacher Will 
Speak At Sixty-second 
Annual Exercises 



Sixty-six seniors and a few others 
are looking forward to Commence- 
ment which is now closing down to a 
matter of days; days filled with ac- 
tivity and deliciously savored with the 
culminating enjoymftit of the actual 
campus associations. 

Plans for the Commencement and 
Class Day exercises are being worked 
out very definitely. The Monday 
night of Commencement week will be 
given over to the Annual Concert by 
the Music Faculty and Music Stud- 
ents. The following day, designated 
as Alumni Day, will be devoted to a 
reception in the early part of the 
day, the Class Day exercises in the 
afternoon, and the Alumni Banquet in 
the evening at Chef's Place. 

All details of the Class Day exer- 
cises are not yet to be made public. 
However, it was especially stated that 
the usual "Ivy Oration" will be held 
after the Exercises. 

The Toastmaster of the Alumni 
Banquet will be Dr. Orville P. DeWitt, 
a lawyer of National Park, N. J. Dr. 
DeWitt is a Lebanon Valley man of 
the class of '98. Anna Kreider is the 
Chairman of the Alumni Committee, 
and Miss Esther Walmer is the Sec- 
retary. An unusually large number of 
Alumni are expected to return mainly 
through the interest in the project of 
beautifying the campus, which has 
been receiving very general discussion. 

The last day will be the Commence- 
ment. The speaker will be Mr. Louis 
K. Anspacher, one of America's dis- 
tinguished dramatists and orators. 
Mr. Anspacher is author of a good 
many dramas, produced in American 
theatres and abroad. As an orator 
Mr. Anspacher is of the finest calibre, 
and Lebanon Valley has been fortun- 
(Continued on page 3) 



On Friday evening, May 4th, mem- 
bers and friends of the Philokosmian 
Literary Society anxiously followed 
the career of "Cyrano de Bergerac" 
to its dramatic close, after he had 
valiantly fought and supremely sacri- 
ficed before he met an inglorious 
death at the hands of Paris black- 
guards. This seventeenth Century 
hero was made famous by the pen of 
Edmond Rostand in one of the sensa- 
tional successes of French drama 
during the 19th Century. 

The occasion was the sixty-first 
anniverstry of Philo, celebrated in a 
fitting manner by the dramatization 
of this play, which was excellently 
given and highly appreciated by the 
large audience. Many alumni and 
friends were present to help make 
the birthday a success. 

Due to the length of the feature 
the first part of the program was 
made short, consisting of the Invoca- 
cation by O. T. Ehrhart, '10, followed 
by the address of President Millard 
Miller. 

Cyrano de Bergerac (played by 
Bruce Behney) was a Gascony Cadet, 
a poet, a scholar, and a fighter and 
possessed courage and recklessness 
(Continued on page 3) 



CAST CHOSEN FOR 

SENIOR PRODUCTION 



Following the recent tryouts, Darkes 
Albright selected Bennetta Burrier, 
Nelda Spatz, Viola Wolfe, Catherine 
Craven, Eleanor Snoke, Alice Kindt. 
Walter Pugh, Henry Brubaker, Joe 
Bruno, Bruce Behney, Harvey Nitrau- 
er and Pass Bollinger as the cast 
which will enact "The Passing of the 
Third Floor Back," to be given by the 
Seniors on Thursday, May 24. Re- 
hearsals for the play have been start- 
ed and plans are going forward for 
its presentation. 

Committees in charge of the produc- 
tion of the drama are: Costumes, 
Bernice Hoover, Mary Geyer, Millard 
Miller; Properties: Roy Flook, Jacob 
Horst, Anna Mark, and Make-Up, 
Olivette Haas. 



SLIGHT FIRE CAUSED 
BY WIRING DEFECT 

North Hall Girls Are Given 
A Scare When Flames 
Threaten Dorm 



Prompt action by Paul Piersol and 
Darkes Albright in all probability pre- 
vented serious results from the short 
circuit which started a slight fire at 
the switchboard in North Hall on Fri- 
day evening, April 2*7. The defect in 
the wiring system was found on the 
fourth floor of the dormitory, and the 
wires were cut to eliminate any poss- 
ibility of more serious consequences. 

When one of the girls attempted to 
place a light in the empty socket 
above the fire escape on the east side 
of the building, she received a severe 
shock and shortly after flames were 
discovered at the switchboard on sec- 
ond floor. Even after these flames 
had been extinguished, smoke contin- 
ued to fill the halls. 

At that stage of events Dr. Gos- 
sard, Prof. Grim and Mr. Barnhart 
appeared on the scene and after work- 
ing for a half hour, Prof. Grim de- 
clared the building out of danger. 
When electricians were repairing the 
damage the next day they stated that 
had the wires not been cut, fire would 
have broken out on the fourth floor. 



Elizabeth Engle is reported to be 
rapidly improving after her recent 
operation for appendicitis at the 
Hershey Hospital. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY io, 1928 




tuts 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



CAROL E. BRINSER, '29 
JOHN W. SNYDER, '30 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 

JOHN W. BEATTIE, '29. 
Associate Editors 

MILES S. KIEHNER, ?& 

General Reporters 

ESTHER ANGSTADT, '30 
RUSSELL E. MORGAN, '31 

Conservatory M. ALCESTA SLICHTER, !30 

Athletics NORMAN VANDERWALL, '30 

Clionian GLADYS M. KNAUB, '30 

Delphian RUTH A. STRUBHAR, '2'J 

Kalozetean £ JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

Philokosmian CHARLES H .WISE, '31 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 

L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Associate Business Manager J. CALVIN KEENE, '30 

Circulation Manager HARRY L. HOVIS, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year — Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



EDITORIALS 



THE SPRING RECITALS 

"Music study exalts life." So the old saying goes, and it is 
oeing proved constantly on our campus. Who would like to 
live without hearing, either physically or mentally, a note of 
music from one year to the next? That would be mere existence, 
not life. Music is a necessity to life, and it was the realization of 
this fact which led the authorities of Lebanon Valley College to 
found a conservatory within the bounds of the College. Our 
conservatory has been an inspiration as well as a place of study, 
for many people during its past existence. We are now ap- 
proaching the time of year when its presence is most keeniy 
felt, the time when the fruits of all the efforts and struggles of 
the students and teachers during the past year will be reaped. 

We refer, of course, to the student spring recitals, which will 
begin sometime dua"ing this week, and continue for three 
weeks, with two each week. The programs will be made up of 
vocal, violin, piano, and organ selections by the advanced stu- 
dents of the Conservatory. These recitals are a valuable asset 
to the College, and also to the community. Music is universal 
in its appeal, and is enjoyed by people in all phases of life. Re- 
citals* develop and increase an appreciation and enthusiasm for 
high class music. They hep increase the musical knowledge of 
all who listen to their performance Recitals are always of 
value to the performers also. They offer practical experience in 
stage conduct, poise, and performance. They help the students 
who take part in interpretation as it is the aim of an artist, 
not only to put his own feelings into his work, but to cause the 
piece with its message and emotions to be recreated in the mind 
of each individual listener. This quality can be obtained and 
strengthened only by stage experience. These student perform- 
ances are also a goal and incentive toward which to work during 
the school year. Let us all cooperate in making this season 
the best possible. 



EAST MEETS WEST AT 

MAY QUEENS THRONE 

(Continued from Page 1) 



WHICH? 



The most vital force prompting the choosing of a life's voca- 
tion today is : the service one can render to humanity or the striv- 
ing for financial success regardless of service. This problem is 
especially confronting the graduating classes of all educational 
institutions. 

One hears so much admonition concerning service, that it 
becomes obnoxious, and to some, something to be considered very 
lightly, if at all. Rockefeller, Carnegie, Schwab, J. P. Morgan 
and hosts of others rendered untold service to humanity, and to- 
day are among the group of the world's most distinguished and 
respeeted men. Each of these men entered his chosen vocation 
with service as the foremost thought in mind. Financial power 
came incidentally to crown their efforts. 

On the other hand, at least 95% of the Seniors going out of 
our colleges and universities today are looking for "jobs" with 
the highest premium, regardless of whether or not their whole 
heart is in what they do to attain that premium. All of us must 
take thought of the financial returns, and it is only human nature 
to do so. But, should one forget or sacrifice service at the ex- 
pense of "big pay"? This problem is especially applicable within 
our own gates, and should be given serious consideration. 

Think it over! 



a welcome to her audience seated 
around the circular court to join in 
the merriment; the jester, "Red" 
Keiser, somersaulted down the steps 
of the throne and the mirth began. 

The American school children were 
the first representatives at court to 
entertain the queen. The first grade 
of the Annville public school gave the 
dance of butterflies and bettles who 
frolic in May breezes, the second 
grade were the rabbits who scamper 
about the fields, and the third were 
the elves and fairies who are happiest 
in the month of May. Japanese maid- 
ens, none other than our senior girls, 
then tripped out gaily before the 
throne, and with fans, now clicking, 
now fluttering, they danced before 
the queen. 

A brown velvet bull, who rushed 
viciously before the court, pawed the 
earth and smoked with rage ,was a 
delight to the whole assembly. Up to 
the bull stepped a brave toreador and 
goaded the beast on to greater fury 
with a tantalizing red handkerchief. 
After numerous dodges, the toreador 
laid low the bull, aided by the jester 
who wound the animal's brown velvet 
tail around his stick and bells. 

Dutch boys and girls, the fresh- 
men, were droll entertainers of the 
court. The boys finally so disgusted 
their fair partners with their folly 
that the girls dragged them by their 
ears from the queen's presence in dis- 
grace. Spain sent to the May Queen 
two senoritas who, with their gallant 
partners, exhibited the tango with 
spirit and gusto. Brightly dressed 
girls of Italy, our sophomore co-eds, 
entertained the court with their vi- 
vacious steps. From Paris came an 
Apache and his partner, and they in- 
terpreted vividly the uncrushable 
love of a girl of the Latin Quarter 
for her pitiless Apache lover. Last 
of all, the English youths and maid- 
ens, who were selected from the 
Junior Class, gathered about the May 
Pole to wind around it bright colored 
ribbons as they performed the tra- 
ditional May Pole dance. 

The chairman of the May Day 
Committee was Emma Schaeffer, and 
assistant chairman was Lawrence 
Derickson. Under their direct super- 
vision were several sub-committees in 
charge of the details of the May Day 
plans. 



GLEE CLUB PRESENTS 

A PLEASING CONCERT 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Visitors could not appreciate the apparent anxiety to get 
away from chapel on cerain mornings of the week, and probably 
would not approve of the disorganized dash for the exits. For 
an example: this morning". 

The American History Classes recently interested themselves 
in the satirical writings of David Ross Locke, who used the pen 
name, "Petroleum V. Nasby". We wonder if he was a Repub- 
lican? 



weeks previous to it, the club was in 
excellent condition, and quite able to 
do it in their best style. The house 
received every number in a most nf- 
able manner, helping the boys to do 
their best by a generous applause. 
The formality of the sedate musical 
program was broken by the comedy 
of the sketch. With the possible ex- 
ception of exaggeration, real college 
life "as she is" was portrayed by it. 
Bollinger and Russell showed the 
feminine part of their nature in a 
most genteel manner. Following 
their usual custom, the boys gave a 
yell at the close of the program. Not 
being under obligation to ony spons- 
oring organization, they expressed 
their appreciation for the work and 
leadership of Professor Crawford, 
who made the club the unusual suc- 
cess that it is, by giving him the 
yell. The club wishes to thank the 
student body and all other patrons 
for the excellent support received 
Its ambition is to do as well and bet- 
ter next year. 




"C 



'O wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!' 



—BURNS 



SAVED 

A Rip-Roaring Farce Comedy in Two Acts 
(Synopsis) 

Scene: North Hall on a pteaceful Friday night 
ACT I 

Two modest youths are being- entertained in the parlor. Sud- 
denly a cry of "Fire, Fire" sends the young- men tearing madly 
up the steps while the frenzied women scurry to their rooms, 
(For the sake of avoiding all unnecessary publicity, the names 
of the young gentlemen will be withheld and only nicknames 
will be given). By the combined efforts of Peck, Darky, and a 
fire extinguisher, the flames are expunged. However, just as the 
curtain is about to fall, a cry of "Fire, Smoke, Fire" again arises 
and Act I ends with a frantic rush to the third floor. 

• ACT II 

The curtain rises showing the interior of a room on third 
floor. Part of the corridor is visible through the open door. A 
table supporting two chairs on the top one of which the valient 
Mr. Barnhart is angelically swaying is located directly under a 
small trapdoor through which are seen thb two youths previously 
introduced. Two girls are making repeated trips from the room 
to the corridor where they deposit clothes taken from the closet 
together with other valuables. A lively discussion concerning 
the whereabouts of a certain- treasure arises among the two girls 
who remain in the corridor, their work being finished. The men 
hear a few meaningful remarks as they emerge from the room. 
One slips quietly back into the room and reappears with a hand- 
some portrait. This is immediately pounced upon by the maiden 
whose dry lips frame the word, "Saved!" as the curtain rustles 
down the last act. 

Moral: When putting out iV. es in a girl's- dormitory, keep one 
eye open for the unusual. 

We congratulates Dr. Schell. He was the first chapel speak- 
er to realize the essential truth of "Brevity it the soul of wit." 



S. O. G. was found meandering around the North Hall with a 
most pathetic, woe-begone expression. The only information 
that could be gathered from him was that he had lost a pencil 
in the fire excitement. Sympathetic students were about to take 
up an offering to buy him another good pencil when it was dis- 
covered he had lost a common blue one, purchasing price, three 
cents. , . ■ . . . 



Miss Wallace received a letter with the following address: 
Miss M. K. Wallace 
North Hall 

Lebanon Valley Gas Co. 
Annville, Pa. 

Evidently the reputation of our girls is being noised abroad 



A near catastrophe occured recently when the Prof Wagner 
Pride and Joy was placed on a small baby scales. After balanc- 
ing himself precariousy for several seconds, the youngster de- 
cided to stage a family thriller and toppled out, landing irreg- 
ularly on the proboscis, and with true first-child-father's anxiety, 
the professor felt obliged to cut classes for the day. 

Bendigo had read his English lesson. He was almost sure. 
Yet he had a doubt. 

"Whose race was that?" he asked tiiemulously, trying to appear 
casual. 

"Atalanta's." was the reply. 

Whereupon a beatific smile settled upon his handsome features. 
He had not got his sporting news muddled. That was Englisj} 
literature. Who ever heard of a modern track star named that. 



I Icrtzler — "What are your reasons for driving a car?" 
Kecne — "Mary, Edna, Anna, and Dot. 



Bechtel felt no vital urgle for food Saturday morning. Yet k e 
did appear at North Hall to escort the girl friend to the P ** 
office immediately after breakfast. However, his explanation 
is preeminently satisfactory. He thought it was ten o'clock- 
His alarm clock said it was. 



Miss McCurdy— "May I please have 'The Red Boat'?" 
Miss Myers — "We don't have that." 
McCurdy — "Perhaps it was the 'Scarlet Ship'." 
Miss Myers — "We have no such book." 

McCurdy (consulting her notebook) — "Oh, I beg your pardon- 
It's the 'Ruby Yacht.' " (Rubyiat) 



\ 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1928 



PAGE THREE 



"CYRANO DE BERGERAC" 
DRAMATIZED BY PHILO 

f 

j (Continued from page 1) 



which were ..boundless. He sincerely , 
Ibved his cousin Roxane (Alice, 
itindt) but his physical appearance 
prevented him from expressing his 
feeling to her. A nose of unusual size 
jharred his' features and was the 
source of trouble on several ccasions.; 

Comte de Guiche (Russell Oyer) 
had plans for a match between a pro- 
tege of his and Roxane. But Roxane 
had fallen in love with' the handsome 
Christian de Neuvillette (Millard 
Miller) arid succeeded in having Cy- 
ran promise to care for him. Chris- 
tian insults his protector by alluding 
to his nose, but de Bergerac checks 
his impulse to_fight and later agrees 
to assist another in winning the wo- 
man he loves. Cyrano lends his soul 
to de Neuvillette to complete a "hero 
of Romance" who might win the ob-j 
ject of their attention. 

. V ■ : 9 h *$ j 

This "hero of Romance" attracted 
the love of Roxane and on the nigh 
before the Gascbny cadets shouk 
march away to assist in siege of Ar 
ras, she is married to the handsm< 
cadet of her choice by a passing 
Capuchin (Milford Knisley). 

The scene then shifted to the post 
occupied by the company of Captain 
Carbon de Castel-Jaloux (Uhl Kuhn). 
Roxafie^ spurred 6h by 'the letters of 
Christian, finds her way to the camp 
just after de Guiche had given the 
orders for the cadets to hold back 
the lines of the Spanish until help 
should arrive. She sees Christian 
carried off. the field, a, victim of the 
enemy's first shot, and Cyrano re- 
fuses to reveal, that he was the writer 
of the letters. 

Roxane now returns to Paris to 
enter the convent of the sisters of the 
Crossi In this city, fifteen years lat- 
er, de Bergerac was struck down 
from behind in a brutal attack, and 
went to the convent to die. He re 
vealed his love for his cousin while 
reading the letter which she sup 
posed Christian had' written. She then 
discovered that it was realty Cyranp 
she loved. He feebly denied the fact 
went into a state of delirium, and 
fell back into the arms of Le Bret 
(Calvin Keene) and Raguenean (El 
mer Kreiser) to die, 

The entire cast is as follows: 



Cyrano de Bergerac .Bruce Behney 
•Christian de Neuvillette 

Millard Miller 
Comte de Guicbe r -----Russell Oye 
Rague^eaULJl-ll^lL'EhTier A. Reiser 
Le Bret____i__ — 1_-Calvin Keene 
Captain Carbon de Castel Jaloux 

Uhl R. Kuhn 

A Cadet_i_i____- : John Bealti 

Ligniere___: John Snyde 

De Valvert Henry Kohlei 

Montfiuery— _- '- ___W alter Pugh 

First Marquis Oscar Sneath 

Second Marquis -Edgar Hertz;ler 

First Poet Byron' Sheet 

Second Poet Paul Barahart 

Candle Lighter Edward Orbock 

A Capuchin Milford Knisley 

Roxane Alice Kindt 

The Duenna__Mrs. Bayard Hammon 
The Sweetmeat Vender_Nancy Tjlric 

Sister Martha Marian Dosheime 

' Sister Claire : Mary Ran 

Mother- Margaret __Mary Clynier 

Following the program the recep 
tion was held in North Hair parlors 
Where old friendships were- renewed 
and others formed. Outside the hall 
the Philo sign blinked is wecome, ah 
when all the guests had assembled 
the Philo boys served them with re 
treshments. 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 

KALOZETEAN 



CLIONIAN 



The murderer of Mose Light is still 
at large in spite of the fact that at 
the last session of Kalo Pete Kralick 
was tried for his murder. Kralick 
was acquited by the jury on the 
grounds of conflicting and insufficient 
evidence. 

The murder was committed at Har- 
pers, in the Inn owned and operated 
by "Broady" Derickson. There was 
the usual card game, and drink. The 
defendant .had lost considerable mon- 
ey in a card game, and in his rage 
and irresponsible condition he was 
purported to have killed Mr. Light 
in his room on the second floor of the 
hotel. However, the hour the card 
game ended and the- hour that the 
murder was committed varied several 
hours by the statements of various 
witnesses. 

This case was a most remarkable 
one, not so much in the fact that the 
defendant was acquitted, but because 
his lawyer, Hon. Wayne G. Sparrow, 
did not make his plea on the grounds 
of temporary insanity. 

Chief Justice Wilson presided at 
the trial, "Son" Russell was the Clerk 
of the Court. Attorney Archie Luti 
was the State's attorney for the prose- 
cution. Detective Sniff and Snoop 
Roudabush produced very valuable evi- 
dence which seemed to leave no loop 
hole for the defendant, and led the 
large audience that witnessed the trial 
to believe that the hang-man's noose 
had already been tied. 

The argument of the defendant, 
which in the end saved him from the 
gallows, was his proving to the satis- 
faction of the jury that he knew noth- 
ing of the murder, having been only 
a few hours in the town, going to 
: "Tony's Road House" right after the 
game of cards, and after seeing Tony, 
was waiting for the train to New 
York. 

A good many witnesses were sum- 
moned and sworn in by both sides of 
the case. Among these were the Taxi 
driver that took the defendent from 
the hotel in Harpers to 'Tony's"; the 
farmer who was taking his cows to 
pasture at 2:30 in the morning; the 
bootlegger who had his "regular good 
customers"; and Coroner Tetter, the 
Veterinary Doctor. 



DELPHIAN 



Clionions on Friday, April 27, did 
their bit in coaxing the "Trees" 
on our campus to put on their Spring 
garments and it is certain that if ev- 
ery tree had "listened in" on the 
program they would have appeared 
the next morning in green foliage to 
thank the Clio girls for their clever 
representations of the "Tree" family. 

"And he shall be like a tree planted 
by the rivers of water _ _ _" was 
the theme of a short talk on the "Tree 
of Life" by Madeline Rife. All Clios 
shared in the songs that followed un- 
der the direction of Alcesta Slichter: 
"The Linden Tree" and "Farewell to 
the Forest". Mary Stager then rep- 
resented the "Chestnut Tree," by re- 
citing "Trees," by Joyce Kilmore, and 
"The Village Blacksmith," by Long- 
fellow. It fell to the lot of Leah Har- 
pel to mimick the "Weeping Willow" 
after which Ruby Ann See offered a 
little enlightenment on the subject of 
what the "Yew Tree" may mean. Ev 
erybody w T as informed that you never 
can tell what the "Whispering Pines" 
may reveal, through a sketch under 
the direction of Mary Rank. '*«, ,dd 
to the frolic of the evening, Bennetta 
Burrier gathered the "Leaves of All" 
and after having juggled them about, 
reported a most entertaining result 



The Delphian Literary Society met 
in a regular literary session on Fri- 
day night, April 27, with a rather 
good attendance in spite of the storm- 
ing of the elements of Mother nature. 

musical program was presented 
which proved very entertaining. 
Margaret Young, a Freshman Con- 
servatory student, sang a solo, accom- 
panied by Amy Auchenbach, another 
music student. There followed a 
group of songs by Mary Ax and Ruth 
Krout, who accompanied themselves 
with a banjo and "uke". After a vio- 
lin solo by Lillian Barber, a clever 
musical skit was given by Ruth Coop- 
er and Betty Hoy. Katherine Flinch- 
baugh gave a piano solo, after which 
Sara Lou Rose closed the program 
with wise cracks. 



SENIORS WILL Bp 

GIVEN A PARTY 



The members of the Senior Class 
Will be entertained at a banquet and 
party by Dr. and Mrs. Gossard at 
Chef's Place, Thursday, May 17. The 
affair is an annual one, but the mode 
of entertaining is always varied and 
unique. All the preceeding classes 
have brought very pleasant reports 
back to the unfortunate under-class- 
men which made them look forward 
to Senior days. Reports this year are 
sure to be no less favorable. 



CHANGES MADE IN 

1928-29 FACULTY 

(Continued From Page 1) 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



PHILOKOSMIAN 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



uates, taking his B.A. here in 1924 
He will receive his M.A. in Latin and 
Greek at Princton University in June, 
after two years of post graduate 
work there. Prof. Fields has several 
years of teaching experience to his 
credit. He is the son of Dr. Joseph 
C. Fields, formerly minister for eight 
years of Christ Presybyterian Church, 
Lebanon, and now preaching at Christ 
Presbyterian Church, Susquehanna, 
Pa. 

Professor Stella Johnson will fill 
the vacancy in French and German 
occasioned by Mme. Bennett's leave 
of absence. Miss Johnson likewise 
comes here with splendid achieve- 
ments in scholarship. She received 
her A.B. from John Hopkins Univer- 
sity. This June she will take her 
Ph.D. at the same school and will be 
elected to the Phi Beta Kappa frater- 
nity, which is the highest honor ex- 
tended to students of unusual scholar- 
ship in the United States. Miss John- 
son is doing some teaching at the 
present time at John Hopkins, where 
her sister is one of the professors in 
Psychology. In addition to French 
and German, Miss Johnson is also 
qualified to teach Spanish and Italian. 



On Friday evening, April 27, in con 
nection with the installation of offi- 
cers, Philo rendered a very delight- 
ful and inspiring program. Following 
the devotional exercises, the presid- 
ent-elect, Walter Pugh, was installed 
by President Meyer. In his address 
Mr. Pugh set forth the ideals of Phil- 
oko-smianism. The other officers elect- 
ed were then installed. As usual Har- 
old Rider's work at the piano was 
very good. Dr. R. R. Butterwick 
spoke on "College and Literary Socie 
ties." He brought forth truths and' 
facts worth remembering. He saidJ 
"A college without a Literary Society 
is only half a course, and a Literary 
Society without a college, is less than 
half a course." "Living Thoughts, ' ; 
by the editor were mainly along the 
line of Friendship and the value of 
it was brought out by poetry and pro- 
verbs. Meyer's critical remarks then 
closed the program. 



The society is greatly indebted to 
Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, director of 
the play, for his untiring efforts in 
making "Cyrano de Bergerac" a 
great success. 

It also owes a great deal to Alice 
Kindt, Mrs. Bayard Hammond, Nancy 
Ulrich, Marian Dorsheimer, Mary 
Rank and Mary Clymer for their 
work in the cast; to Miss Mary K. 
Wallace, Mrs. Harold Bennett, and 
Miss Ruth Engle for assisting the 
cast; and to James, the victrola man 
of Lebanon, for furnishing the Or- 
thophony Victrola which was used in 
the chapel and North Hall during 
the "program and reception. 



PLANS BEING MADE 

FOR COMMENCEMENT 

(Continued from page 1) 



ate in obtaining him as the Com- 
mencement speaker. 

The speaker for the Baccalauerate 
sermon at the U. B. church the Sun- 
day previous to graduation has not 
yet been definitely arranged for, and 
will be announced at a later date. 

For the first time in the history of 
Lebanon Valley College the degree of 
B. S. in Economics will be conferred. 
There will be two of these degrees. 
The following is the approximate num- 
ber of the degrees that will be con- 
ferred: A.B. degree, 39; B.S. degree, 
17; B.S. in Education, 7; and B.S. in 
Economics, 2. 



IF NOT, WHY NOT? 

In Northwestern university Co-eds 
were given the only privilege which 
American women have failed to wrest 
from men. They were permitted—, 
that's the way the male students put 
it — to pay half the taxi fare, half the 
price of the dance tickets, and half 
the price of the corsage, if any. 

It took a conference of 103 student 
leaders to arrive at this dating millen- 
ium, and then it took two hours of 
persuasive argument by the boys be 
fore the women delegates could see 
the justice of "dutch" dates. 

How about an extension course in 
"dutch" dates at Lebanon Valley? 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Annville 



Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

KODAKS & SUPPLIES, FILMS. 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING-- 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Printing- — Publishing 
Advertising 
Annville Penna. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. B ASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 



THE HUB 



"13 Cumberland Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



PHOTO GRAPHS 
Q)Clz/e Forever 

36 North Eighth Street. 



Photographs of Quality 

BLAZIER & MILLER 

LEBANON, PA. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY to, 1928 



Y.W.-Y.M.C.A Notes 



Delegates from seventeen ' colleges 
of Eastern Pennsylvania met at Al- 
lentown April 27-29, for the annual 
Y. M. C. A. officers conference, the 
meeting being held at Muhlenberg 
College. The theme of the confer- 
ence was "Training for Service" and 
was well presented by prominent edu- 
cational leaders, and Y. M. C. A. 
workers. Paul Barnhart and W. J. 
Myers represented Lebanon Valley at 
the conference and during the ses- 
sions Mr. Barnhart was chosen as a 
member of the State Student Council. 



Plans are being rapidly completed 
for the annual house party of the 
joint Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. Cabinets 
at Mt. Gretna. The date is not yet 
fixed but the week-end of May 19 will 
probably be chosen. 



On Sunday evening, May 6 o'clock 
the Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. met in a 
joint session in the hCapel. The May 
Day court furnished the program and 
the May Queen presided. Half of the 
Chapel was filled with students who 
came to hear the Seniors who will 
soon leave the campus. 

After an opening hymn, Bernice 
Hoover read "The Optimists' Prayer." 
Then the group was entertained with 
a cornet solo by Warren Lebo after 
which Darkes Albright read the scrip- 
ture lesson. Before the next hymn 
Grace Daniel played a beautiful org- 
an solo. Elsie Rider then read a poem 
and a quartet, composed of Bennetta 
Burrier, Eleanor Snoke, Russell Oyer 
and Hilliard Smuck sang a number, 
accompanied by Grace Daniel on the 
piano and Mabel Hafer on the violin. 

Two very good talks were given on 
the subject "Know Thyself," by Mary 
Geyer, showing the girls' point of view 
and by Samuel Meyers, portraying the 
boys' side. After the last hymn the 
meeting was concluded by a prayer, 
by Daniel Pugh. 



L. V. LOSES THREE; 

WIN AND TIE ALSO 



NETMEN DEFEATED BY 

F. & M. ; TIEURSINIS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



more than four men from either team 
at the plate in each canto. 
The score by innings: — 

R. H. E. 

L. V. C. 100 0000 0—1 5 3 

Lafayette 1 2 x— 3 4 1 
Batteries: Piela and Bendigo; Mar- 
burg and Reaser. 



Alumni Notes 



The April Pennsylvania School Jour- 
nal tells of the activities of several 
Lebanon Valley Alumnae. 

Henry H. Baish, '01, one of the org- 
anizers and from its beginning the sec- 
retary of the Pennsylvania School Em- 
ployee's Retirement System, was 
elected president of the National 
Council of Teachers' Retirement Sys- 
tems at their annual meeting held in 
Boston the last week of February. 

Mr. Baish was presented with a 
gavel made from wood from a tree 
planted by Abraham Lincoln in front 
of his residence in Springfield, 111. The 
handle of the gavel was made from 
wood from the door-frame of the Ed- 
wards home in the same city. 



Villa Nova, May 1. 

The Villa Nova 'Priests" apparently 
charmed Napoleon's cussing parsons 
out of the traditional classic. In any 
event, the Martin's were ill received 
by the Peters in the final bargain, for 
the visitors were able to garner only 
three out of the seven pieces of dia- 
mond jacket cloth. 

Mappie' pried off the lid by wheedl- 
ing a three bagger out of Kuczo, but 
Disney and Wentz found the ball un- 
usually sunburned. Albright was 
nailed when trying for home. In the 
second episode Gillospie turned a sin- 
gle into one of the four runs for Villa 
Nova, thus tying Piersol's lone tally 
in the same canto. The fifth showed 
L. V. at premium with a total of three 
runs by the addition of two circuits 
on singles by Abrahams, Jacks, Dis- 
ney, and Wentz. To tie the score, 
Gillespie breezed out a homer, and 
McAndrews popped a single which lat- 
er evolved a run; so the eighth had a 
dampening effect on L. V. 

Piela pitched for the up-stateers 
during the first six innings, when he 
was relieved by Zappia. The game 
was one of the snappiest played here 
in many a fortnight. 

The score by innings: — 

R. H. E. 

L. V. C. 10 2 0—3 7 3 

Villanova ___ 01000003 x— 4 S 4 
Batteries: Piela, Zappia and Bendi- 
go; Kuczo and Flannigan. 



Mr. S. F. W. Morrison, '18, who is 
located at Clearfield, Pa., has been 
appointed to membership on the Com- 
mittee on Nominations and Elections 
of the Pennsylvania State Education- 
al Association by the President, Jos- 
eph H. Nonaan. 



Elwood D. Heiss, '21, is the co-au- 
thor with W. H. Atwood of "Educa- 
tional Biology" a text-book which has 
just appeared from P. Plakis'ton's Son 
and Co., Philadelphia. The text is 
intended to meet the demand in nor- 
mal 'schools and state teacher train- 
ing colleges for a background of 



Annville, Pa., May 4. 
The most interesting game the local 
fans witnessed during this season on 
the home lot was a hotly contested 
pitching fracas between Piela of L. 
V. and Keen for Western Maryland 
here this afternoon. Piela allowed 
only two bingles while Keen offered 
seven. This, however, was no indi 
cation of weakness in the visiting bat- 
tery. Timely hitting and errors prac- 
tically gave the game to Lebanon Val- 
ley. 

The Blue and White was held score- 
less until the fourth when Snyder, 
with two men on base and two out, 
drove the horsehide to center field, 
the wallop netting two runs on Neal's 
error. This fixed the number of tall- 
ies for L. V., but the local aggrega- 
tion threatened several times. In the 
sixth Keen scored the lone run of 
the game for the visitors. 

The score by innings: — 

R. H. E. 

West. Md. __ 00001 00 0—1 2 o 

L. V. C. 000 200 Ox— 2 7 1 

Batteries: Keene and Weisbackj 
Piela and Bendigo. 



Franklin and Marshall's tennis team 
romped to an easy victory over the 
Lebanon Valley team at Lancaster, 
Wednesday, May 2, six matches to 
one. It was Lebanon Valley's second 
defeat of the season. 
The Summary: 

Singles: Kahler, f. and M. defeated 
Shroyer, Lebanon Valley 6-3 and 6-2. 

Feagley, F. and M. defeated Hertz- 
ler, Lebanon Valley 8-6, 4-6. and 6-2. 

Schupp, F. and M. defeated Fink, 
Lebanon Valley, 6-0, 3-6, and 6-2. 

Eckman, F. and M defeated Rank, 
Lebanon Valley 6-3, and 6-3. 

Apple, F. and M. defeated Eberly, 
Lebanon Valley, 6-0, and 6-3. 

Doubles: Shroyer and Hertzler, 
Lebanon Valley, defeated Kahler and 
Feagley, F. and M. 9-7, and 6-4. 

Eckman and Apple, F. and M. de- 
feated Fink and Rank, Lebanon Valley 
8-6 and 6-j.. 



Annville, Penna., May 5, '28 
The Blue and White stacked up 
against Ursinus for its annual May 
Day baseball exhibition here this af- 
ternoon. The game was played ao 
cording to the qualifications of 'ja 
"thriller," but the local club showed a 
sloppy brand of ball until the eighth 
when the Ursinus pitcher, Mink, blew 
up. At that time Jupe Pluvius so 
watered the stamping grounds that 
the game was called with the score 
a tie. Had L. V. finished its cam- 



In the opening of the home season 
the tennis team tied the strong Ursi- 
nus netmen 3 matches to 3. The 
games were hotly contested and it 
was anybody's set until the last point 
was made. 

Fink and Eberly were winners in 
the singles and lateT came through 
with a victory in the doubles. 



turned into a run. The third made 
matters still worse when singles by 
Disney and Wentz went to naught, 
after Piersol's pop fly and Jack's fail- 
ure to beat the pellet to first. In the 
fourth, Bendigo came thru with an- 
other hit, but his single was fruitless 
for a double play followed. Zappia 
doubled in the fifth and scored on a 
single by Jacks. Albright, Disney and 
Wentz flied to left and right fields 
to complete the inning. The memor- 
able eighth started with Albright be- 
ing thrown out at first. Disney walk- 
ed, Wentz flied to left field, Piersol 
made first on an error, and Lebanon 
Valley's two runs scored on a single 
by Bendigo followed with a double by 
Piela. 

Piela was put out at second to com- 
plete the inning just as rain ended 
the game. 

The score by innings: — 

R. H. E. 

Ursinus 10 2 0—3 6 2 

L. V. C. 010 2—3 9 2 

Batteries: Mink and Francis; Zap- 
pia and Bendigo. 



BOVINO BESTS DAUB 

IN PITCHERS' DUEL 



The Frosh got the short end of a 
2-1 score that ended the ten inning 
annual Soph-Frosh baseball game 
played on the athletic field last Tues- 
day afternoon. The original plan was 
a 7 inning game, but due to the tie 
score, ten innings were played. Shroy- 
er, of the Sophs socked a two-bagger 
to bring in Renninger with the win- 
ning run. Until the last few innings 
the game was a' pitcher's battle, very 
little hitting being allowed by either 
twirler. Grant's double which brought 
in Paul to give the Frosh their run 
was the spectacular Frosh play. To- 
wards the end the crowd dwindled to 
a handful, supper proving to be more 
of an attraction than the game. Those 
who remained however, witnessed one 
of the snappiest ball games that has 
been played this year. 

Score by innings. 

R. H. E 

Sophs. 00 001 00 1—2 7 

Frosh. 00010000—1 3 4 



training in biology for all teachers 

Mr. Heiss is a product of the bio- 1 paign, the score, no doubt, would have 
logical department of Lebanon Valley j been somewhat different, 
and has had additional training in j Lebanon Valley's first inning didn't 
Teachers College, Columbia Univers- . even create an impression upon the 



Emmitsburg, Md., May 9 
The Mt. St. Mary's nine applied the 
kalsomine brush to "Hooks" Mylin's 
Pennslyvanians, who presented a 
rather poor calibre of baseball in 
their game here today. 

The Saints played themselves into 
the lead on Hemler's single and 



HOFFMAN STEAM. PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



Campbell's homer. Another run 
scored on a walk, and a triple by 
Hemler, put McGarrigan among the 
circuit men making Mt. St. Mary's 
final score three to nothing. 

Piela pitched his worst game of 
the season, walking eight, striking 
out only four, and allowing eight 
hits. He was relieved in the seventh 
by Joe Abrahams who held the 
priests hitless for the remainder of 
the game. The fielding for both clubs 
was on par, and the hitting for Leb- 
anon tho not bunched, deserved 
something more than a shutout. 

The score by innings: — 

R. H. E. 

L. V. C. 000000000—0 6 1 

Mt. St. M. __ 21 0000 00x— 3 7 
Batteries: Piela, Abrahams and 
Bendigo; Tenehan and Veltzer. 



D. L Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers irL 

Lumler and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 
LEBANON. PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 
Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 
• Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

UNION EMBLEM CO VALLE p A lmyr! ™ ild]no 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



ity, where he has almost completed 
the requirements for the Ph.D. 



spectators and much less did the sec- 
ond when Bendigo's triple was not 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS-TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



DOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE PA. 



ONLY 20 DAYS 
UNTIL 
COMMENCEMENT 



Mte €a%iennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SUBSCRIBE NOW 
SENIORS! 
1928-29 LA VIE 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA. t THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1928 



NUMBER 15 



GORSKI HEADS THE 
NEW W. S. G. A. BOARD 

Dr. Gossard Installs Members 
Of Women's Governing Body 
At Chapel Service 

The W. S. G. A. board for 1928-29 
was installed by Dr Gossard on Moy 
12th during the regular morning 
chapel service. After Dr. Gossard 
had called the new members to the 
platform, he spoke impressively to 
them of the great honor of their 
position at the helm of our women's 
student government and the re- 
sponsibility that membership on thi^ 
board thrust upon them. He likewise 
pointed out that as they were chosen 
because their comrades considered 
them competent, they had standards 
which they must live up to and ideals 
which they must ever keep before 
them. 

The new W. S. G. A. officers in- 
stalled are Edna Gorski, President; 
Ann Apgar, Vice President; Nancy 
Ulrich, Treasurer; Gladys Knauh 
Secretary. The four additional mem- 
bers elected to the board are Jane 
Fearnow, senior representative of the 
dormitory students, Esther Kauffman, 
senior representative of the day stu 
dents, Leah Miller and Madeline 
Sheddy representatives of the junio 
and sophomore classes respectively: 



CLEVER CLIO CIRCUS 
CROWDS CALM CAMPUS 

Charming Carousing Caravan 
Circles Campus Cavorting 
Cheerfully 



No small quantity of merriment 
was brought to the Lebanon Valley 
campus on Wednesday evening, May 
16, when Clio Circus, with its varied 
performances made its third invasion. 
The affair differed from those of 
former years at the very beginning, 
for the parade around the town w.as 
omitted to allow more time for the 
introduction of new features. 

When the crowd had gathered a- 
round a large circle in the middle of 
the campus, the ring leader heralded 
the circus participants into the rini 
and the fun began 

The "Dolly Sisters" gave a unique 
drill in their blue and white costumes, 
using sticks wrapped with blue and 
white crepe paper as guns. Not only 
local talent was employed to enter- 
(Continued on Page 2.) 



MRS. MILLS' PUPILS 

APPEAR IN RECITAI 



The pupils of Edith Frantz Mills 
Save a recital of song in the Tabor 
Reformed Church at Lebanon, Thurs - 
day, May 17. Songs of all types and 
wnguagres, including French, German, 
Spanish and Italian, were presentee' 
w 'th artistic ability. The girls' cho.us, 
*nade up of fifteen of Mrs. Mills'- 
Pupils, rendered their numbers es- 
pecially well. The chorus opened the 
Program with "Will o' the Wisp" and 
Song of Thanksgiving", and conclud- 
e <* it with "Dawn of Love", with 
^°ris James of Lebanon taking the 
s <>lo part. The students presented to 
Jfrs. Mills a beautiful basket of car 
Nations and roses. 



EURYDICE CONCLUDES 

SUCCESSFUL SEASON 

The Eur j; dice Choral Club, under 
the direction of Miss Ruth Engle, 
gave a concert in the Realty Theatre 
in Middletown, Monday, May 7. The 
club was well patronized by an ap- 
preciative audience. A reception was 
tendered the girls at the home of 
Fay Bachman after the concert. 

On Friday f May 18, the club took 
a trip to Minersville, where they gave 
two concerts in the High School Audi- 
torium. The afternoon concert was 
made up entirely of light numbers, 
being mostly for school children. The 
audience was the most enthusiastic 
one to which the club ever sang. The 
"kiddies" especially enjoyed the 
opera 

After the afternoon concert the 
girls wen- on a theatre party to a 
beautiful new theatre in Pottsville. 

Following the evening concert, the 
club enjoyed a light luch at the horn- 
of Grace Daniel, their accompanist 
and basiness manager. 



GLEE CLUB HOLDS 
BAHQOETAT CHEF'S 

Oyer And Keene Are Selected 
To Head Club For Next 
Year 



MYLINMEN COP THREE 
BATTLESJN A ROW 

Susquehanna, Juniata And 
Bucknell Fall Before 
L. V. C. Nine 



The annual banquet of the Men's 
Glee Club took place Tuesday, May 
22. Chef served one of his unsur- 
passable dinners to the club and Drs, 
Gossard, Bender, Butterwick, Bennett, 
and Wagner, the guests for the even- 
ing. The first hour was silently spent 
in stowing away the feed — chicken 
waffles, potatoes, corn, side dishes — 
topped off with ice cream and 
smokes. Then the fun began. Slight- 
ly handicapped by the presence of 
another party, the boys could not let 
out as completely as they might have. 
As it was, the other party considered 
the hearty renditions of ":he favorite 
numbers to be entertainment for 
them. The difficulty was soon solved 
by moving into a secluded corner, 
forming a round table and opening 
(Continued on Page 3) 



HOUSE PARTY OF T 
CABINETS IS HELD 

Mount Gretna Is Place Of En- 
tertainment For Old And 
New Cabinets 



Friday evening, May 18, a happy 
crowd of Y. M. and Y. W. Cabinet 
members bounced their way on a 
truck to Mount Gretna. It was the 
annual joint house party and a good 
and profitable time was in store foi 
those who went. Friday evening a 
short service was held and then all 
scattered to various entertainments. 
Next morning after a good breakfast, 
plans for next year were made. It 
has been remarked that plans made 
for the following year rarely pan out. 
This year, under the leadership of 
Emma Shaffer and Lawrence Derick- 
son the results, we are sure, will be 
different. 

Saturday afternoon roller skating 
and a baseball game were the attrac- 
(Continued on page 3) 



Annville, Pa., May 12, 1928. 

In striking contest to their previous 
game the Lebanon Valley diamond 
men set a record-breaking mark foi 
the season in runs, hits and premier 
playing against Susquehanna here 
today. The game was featured b> 
two successive home-runs by Went:: 
and Bendigo. Besides pitching the 
full course, Zappia sank two doubles 
out on three times at bat, walked 
twice, scored four runs himself, and 
drove several others across the plate. 
Wentz laid low a single, a double and 
a homer out of five times at bat while 
Bendigo also made some timely hits, 
including a home run. 

The first act was quite tame with 
only one single by Baird, but in the 
second, Bendigo started the scoring 
which resulted in four runs for the 
local club. The fourth brought v. 
four more runs for Mylin's protogee'f 
when Piela and Zappia and Jacks 
scored on the timely drives of Disney 
and Albright. The fifth was a relief 
for Susquehanna when Moyer's hora- 
(Continued on page i) 



OELPHIAN AND KALO 
HOLD JOINT PROGRAM 

Delphian Hall Is Scene Of 
Cleverly Arranged Dual 
Session 



A most unique joint session of Kalo 
Delphian was held last Friday, May 
11. The entire program, seating ar- 
rangement, and refreshments follow- 
ed the plan of a tea room setting. 
The program was opened by fitting 
remarKs from the president. An 01- 
chestra supplied the music between 
courses. To top off the evening, a 
sketch that caricatured "Stokes" to- 
gether with several of our other not- 
ables, was played in a clever way. 
Much ingenuity was displayed in 
bringing in the characters through 
the dorm window. Delphian Hall 
was pleasingly decorated for the oc- 
casion. The tables for four, scattered 
throughout . the hall ; were gayly 
trimmed with her colors. The re 
freshments were served in four 
courses, each bf which was tempting- 
ly delicious and displayed the good 
taste of the girls in charge of their 
preparations. One of the features of 
the program was a musical saw sel • 
lection by Russell. This was some- 
thing new and received quite a hand. 
"Among My Souvenirs" sung by a 
trio also went over big. The affaii 
was attended by one of the largest 
gatherings ever entertained at a joint 
session. 



We have learned with deep 
regret of the recent passing of 
W. H. Washinger, Bishop of the 
Pacific District of the United 
Brethren Church. In him the 
church has lost a great spiri- 
tual leader, and the college a 
sincere friend. 



SENIORS ARE RANKED 

IN CARNEGIE TESTS 



The Carnegie achievement tests 
which included approximately 3800 
questions and which sixty-six Leb- 
anon Valley seniors took two weeks 
ago have now been marked and the 
students ranked according to their 
scores. The results of the tests have 
been sent to the Carnegie Foundation, 
New York City, where they will be 
compared with the scores of othe' 
colleges and universities. It is not 
expected that any school will know 
before September, how it ranks in 
comparison with other institutions in 
the state. 

Educational leaders of the eastern 
and western part of the state will 
meet in Reading and Pittsburgh res- 
spectively on May 28 to discuss the 
merits of these tests. Revisions will 
probably be made in the tests before 
they are repeated next May. Those 
questions which were generally un- 
answered may be eliminated and more 
universal ones substituted. 



JUNIORS PLACE THE 
QUITTIES ON SALE 

1929 Annual Dedicated To Di 
Wallace; Egyptian Theme 
Prevails 



A wave of excitement passed over 
the campus when the "Quitties" < f 
the class of 1929 made their appear- 
ance last Friday. The book is very 
unique and individual and does the. 
class much honor. The theme is 
Egyptian with a color scheme of red 
yellow and black to correspond with 
it. The Quittie has a very attrac- 
tive, yet endurable^ maroon cover. 

The Junior class dedicated its ann- 
ual to Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace; Pro- 
fessor of English who is a very de- 
voted friend of the class and to the 
whole school. 

Much credit is due to the untiring 
efforts of the editor, Miles S. Kiehnei . 
the business manager, Archie Lutz 
whom the class chose to "put across" 
the most important piece bf work for 
(Continued on Page 3) 



FAREWELL PARTY IS 
TENDERED SENIORS 

President And Mrs. Gossard Are 
Hosts At Annual Senior 
Social Affair 



Perhaps the most enjoyed social 
affair of the collegiate season oc- 
curred on Thursday, May 17, when 
President and Mrs. Gossard gave 
their annual party for the departing 
Seniors. The evening opened at K 
o'clock with a riotous party in the 
gymnasium. Each guest was pre- 
sented with a program immediately 
upon arrival. Various contests were 
staged and prizes were given to 
lucky individuals. A rainy-day race 
vied with paper-hat making contest, 
marbles, cracker-eating, whistling, 
ballon race, shot put, etc in popu 
larity. After punch and pop corn 
had been liberally partaken of, the 
party progressed to Chef's Place by 
means of kind hearted professors' 
machines. 

(Continued on page 4) 



MEN'S SENAT 
1928-29 



E FOR 
S CHOSEN 



Tie Vote Holds Up Selection 
Of President For Com- 
ing Year 



After three ballots had each given 
an equal number of votes to Fredeiic 
Miller and Miles Kiehner, the contest 
for the presidency of the Men's Sen- 
ate was postponed from yesterdav 
until today when an attempt will be 
made to settle the tie. Edgar Shroyer 
was selected as Secretary-Treasurer 
of the group on the second ballot. 

The complete roster of the new 
senate as chosen on Thursday May 17 
follows: 

Senior representatives, Miles S. 
Kiehner, Lawrence Derickson, Henry 
Aungst, Orville Kunkle, Frederic Mil- 
ler and Wayne Sparrow; Junior rep- 
resentatives, William Myers, Rudy 
Cunjack, John Snyder, Edgar Shroyer 
and Calvin Keene; Sophomore repre- 
sentatives, Joe Wood, Kenneth Rus- 
sell and John Rank. 

There was a tie vote between Haz- 
leton and Keene on the first ballot, 
and the vote-off gave preference to 
the latter. 

The new senators will not be in- 
stalled until next year, and they will 
assume their duties immediatey after 
installation. 



ADVANCED STUDENTS 
APPEAR IN RECITALS 

Conservatory Pupils Present 
Pleasing Programs In 
Engle Hall 

The first of the series of spring re- 
citals by the advanced students of the 
Conservatory was held Thursday, 
May 10, by Grace Daniel, piano 
Miriam Oyer, soprano; Mrs. Troutman^ 
controlto; and Mable Yingst, organ; 
with Violet Walter accompanying. 

Miss Daniel, graduating in piano, 
easily convinced her audience of her 
mastery of the instrument. She pos- 
sesses fine musicianship, pianistic 
talent, and a pleasing personality, 
which have always helped her win 
her way into the hearts of her list- 
erers. She has also a fine sense of 
interpretation expressing whole- 
heartedly the various moods of the 
composer. 

Miss Oyer, instructor of music and 
(Continued on page 3) 



CO-EDS WILL MEET 

URSINUS IN TENNIS 



The girls of L. V. C. have almost 
completed the elimination matches 
preparatory to the selection of a var- 
sity tennis team. Only one match 
has been scheduled as yet. The local 
coeds will journey to Ursinus on June 
2 unless' examinations interfere with 
this program in which case the match 
may have to be postponed. Letters 
have been written to Gettysburg 
Bucknell, Drexel ( and Dickinson but 
no favorable replies have been re- 
ceived. L. V. seems to be one of the 
foremost colleges in this section to 
initiate a girls' tennis varsity. If 
matches can only be obtained the 
possibilities for a successful season 
look promising^ 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1928 



latieColIqiennt 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



CAROL E. BRINSER, '29 
JOHN W. SNYDER, '30 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 

JOHN W. BEATTIE, '29. 
Associate Editors 

MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

General Reporters 

ESTHER ANGSTADT, '30 
RUSSELL E. MORGAN, '31 

Conservatory M. ALCESTA SLICHTER, '30 

Athletics NORMAN VANDERWALL, '30 

Clionian GLADYS M. KNAUB, '30 

Delphian RUTH A. STRUBHAR, '2'J 

Kalozetean JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

Philokosmian CHARLES H .WISE, '31 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 

L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Associate Business Manager J. CALVIN KEENE, '30 

Circulation Manager HARRY L. HOVIS, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



EDITORIALS 



WHY A LA VIE? 

Recently, unfavorable criticism has been heard about the 
place of "La Vie Collegienne" on the Campus. Doesn't it take 
more time, effort, and money than it's worth? What is it good 
for? Why go to the trouble to write editorials which perhaps 
five students will read? In answer to those questions, it has 
been thought necessary to write a few words in justification of 
its existence. 

Time, effort, and money are required, certainly; but not 
more than the staff can furnish. Probably its greatest justifica- 
tion is the Alumni. It keeps them informed of the Campus activi- 
ties, of the doings of their friends, and of the progress of the 
school academically, athletically, and socially. Thus it keeps up 
the interest of the Alumni in their Alma Mater. But, it serves 
the students as well. It supplies them with the news (and it is 
news, for no one student can be informed on all the current events 
of the school before reading the paper) . It is instructive as well 
as entertaining. For the members of the staff specifically it af- 
fords valuable training in experience; but this opportunity is not 
restricted to the staff. Every student is at liberty to submit his 
suggestions and contributions; in fact, is urged to do so. For 
some, perhaps, work on the staff will lead to remunerative work 
later in life, even perchance to a journalistic or literary career. 
Most good colleges publish a newspaper. Does it not add "tone" 
to ours to do so 7 



SUBSTITUTION 

Among the recent anonymous contributions to La Vic was 
one in which the lack of social gatherings on our campus was 
decried, and properly chaperoned dancing was suggested as a 
remedy. While there is no one who will deny that thlere is a 
deficiency in our social life, can we say that dancing will fill the 
need? It is undoubedy trute that the receptions, conservatory 
programs, athletic events, joint hikes or joint society sessions 
are inadequate for the need, but will dances supply the demand? 

It seems, almost absurd to even think that dances w ill be a 
great asset to the social life of our campus when local conditions 
are taken into consideration. Permission to dance might be rank- 
ed under "class legislation," for what shall be done with those 
who cannot dance? It is safe to say that for everyone who can 
dance there is one who is not able to glide so gracefully over the 
waxed floor. Shall we provide a form of diversion which docs 
not include a majority of the students? 

We, too, should like to go on record as opponents of the pres- 
ent schedule of social activities, but we should like to see it re- 
placed with a calendar of events to include every student. The 
lengthy anniversary programs might wfell be made shorter to 
permit more time for the reception. The receptions, then, could 
be made moile interesting. Class and inter-class parties,, to in- 
;lude both boys and girls, can be arranged. Any number of 
activities might be suitable for the need, but we suggest that the 
receptions be. made longer and mmv interesting"; that the gir 1 - 
occasionally plan to shark their campus events with the boys, 
and that a number of such joint social affairs be arranged. 



Fishing is in season more than nine months of the year at 
Lebanon Valley, but the co-eds seem to forget that the law re- 
quires a license to be conspicuously displayed by the followers 
of Isaac Walton. 



SENIOR PLAY WILL 
BE GIVEN TONIGHT 

One Of Jerome's Plays Will 
Feature Revival Of Old 
Custom 



After a lapse of one year, the Sen 
ior class will tonight revive the tra- 
ditional custom of presenting a clase 
play near the close of the collegiate 
year. The entertainment of the clastf 
of 1928, however, will differ from 
those of former years in that it is en- 
tirely a student production. H. Darkes- 
Albright, versatile member of the 
class, has coached the cast in pre- 
paration for the presentation of "The 
Passing of the Third Floor Back," 

The play is one Jerome's and is 
in the nature of a religious fantasy. 
The type is not unlike Charles Rann 
Kennedy's "The Servant in the House" 
which adds a..touch of familiarity tr 
the drama. It differs from the plays 
so far presented this year to the ex- 
tent that it will complete a perfect 
balance > 

The scene of the play is laid in a 
middle class Bloomsbury, Londou 
boarding house. There a cheating, 
thieving landlady has as her guests 
several disreputable, quarreling chai - 
acters. A charming, almost beautiful, 
stranger chances by and leaves them 
a brighter and happier lot. There 
is provided plenty of room for subtle 
distinction in character. 

The class of 1928 is laying the 
foundations for a new custom which 
will enable the students to display 
their abilities in dramatic work. It 
is to be hoped that the custom may 
be followed. 



CLEVER CLIO CIRCUS 

CROWDS CALM CAMPUS 

(Continued from page 1) 



tain in trapeze performances, but two 
tots in their green outfits evoked 
much laughter with their antics. 

Two freaks which furnished much 
excitement were the fat lady and th( 
walking Senior corpse which attri- 
buted its demise to the Carnegie test'-, 
The various numbers of the program 
were interspersed by the "Barnyaici 
and Baled Hay" orchestra. 

The scene of Pocahontas and Cap 
tain John Smith together with the 
cowboys and their lassoes added much 
life to the events of the evening, 
while the winner of the motorcycle 
race was crowned with a laurel 
wreath. 

The magicians pulled some genuine 
tricks with no other serious results 
than that Dr. Bender lost a quarter. 
The kiddies were greatly amused 
when the animal show occupied the 
center of the ring, but the trainers 
had t'heir wild animals in check and 
not one escaped. 

The bare back rider showed her 
usual skill and then in spite of the 
fact that one high diver lost her 
nerve, the crowd was not disappoint- 
ed, for her twin sister pulled off the 
stunt After these sisters had walk- 
ed the tight rope, they danced from 
the ring and gave place to the bell- 
hops who were arrayed in tailored 
red suits to give a snappy tap danco. 

The circus ended when prizes were 
awarded to the two winners of the 
poster contest. Helen Copenhaver 
took the first prize while Kathryii 
Bork won second. 





"0 wad some Pow'r the &iftie g/e us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!' 



—BURNS 



LOCHINVAR JR. 

(A Five-Reel Drama) 
Time: — Friday, May 18. 
The Cast: 

Lochinvar Allen, E. Klinger 

His Faithful Attendant Harold C. Rider 

The Girl , Herself 

REEL I — "Lochinvar," dressed in his best white flannels and 
blue coat, waited patiently with his faithful attendant on one of 
the prominent Annville corners until a passing motorist carried 
them safely "out of the west" into Reading-. 

REEL II — A long- yellow, expensive car stopped to pick up 
our heroes and carried them into the residential :section of the 
city. 

REEL III — "The Girl" makes her appearance and expresses 
complete surprise at the visit. Wondering glances are exchang- 
ed, for a fair exchange ia no robbery, and then the amazed Loch- 
invar dazedly reaches into his pocket to draw forth the epistle 
announcing his coming. 

Subtitle: "By Jove, I forgot to mail the letter!" 

REEL IV — Night fell with no serious consequences, and a 
saddened Lochinvar went to bed, having placed his white flannels 
on a chair near an open window. 

REEL V — The curtain rises upon a storm scene. Our here 
fumbles through the dark to save hisi trousers and then gropes 
his way back to bed. Night passed and morning found Loch- 
invar fully awake, sitting up in bed and staring stupidly about 
him. 

Subtitle: "Doggone, I got in the wrong bed last night!" 



Paul said to Welker "Hey Squeek, let's go down to Lebanon 
to the "five and ten" and get a date."' — We would like to know 
whether they sell 'em or give 'em away. 



A rush of air — 

Dripping water — 

A clash of metal — 

And Sneath finished his soup. 



Prof. Wagner told his Calculus class that he had not, then 
looked at their examination papers but he would — just for the 
fun of it. 

We're glad somebody gets a "kick" out of our mental gym- 
nastics. 



The roundup the other night was a bouncing success. "Ab" 
Miller expressing the sentiments of the Freshman class tells us 
that "on the whole they had a whale of a time." 



It's all right to know your onions but don't breath it to a soul. 



"There is no such word as fail," Cried the optimist. "J >ut 
there are plenty of synonyms," growled the pessimist. 

Welker — "Hey, Paul, better get down on that Bible, you 
know we have the final exam tomorrow." 
Paul — "I am DOWN on it." 



Speaking of tight people, Prof. Crawford says that the Penn- 
sylvania I Dutchmen think that the Scotch are spendthrifts 

The first edition of the family album appears as the intro- 
ductory page of the co-ed basketball section in the 1929 Quittie. 

Dr. Reynolds: — "Can anyone tell me the name of the new 
coffee-like drink which does not contain caffine?" 
I Irinser: — "J )rinkit". 

Dr. Reynolds: — "Oh yes' you drink it like the rest." 



DINING HALL CRACKS 

"Chubby" Wilson: "Everybody keep quiet and I'll bet tWP 
bits that wie can hear Piela eating his sfoup over in the othei 
dining room." 



Elsie Rieder (to Behney at supper) "You cat too fast." , 
Behney— "Maybe I do, but I'm always the last one finished. 

Piersol, surveying the platter of chicken one Sunday dinnei 
—"Hey waiter, now bring us the meat that goes with these bones. 



FR 



The 

Ech 
Intc 
Wh 
The 

T 
min 
on 
cere 
exe< 
thrc 
to I 
lane 
"Th 
how 
or i 
by 1 
erer 

N 
ovei 
mer 
how 
run 
ing. 
pref 
pass 
and 
live: 

It 
er s 
cere 
of 1 
ally 
the 
und 
aboi 
Lik< 
thei 
Hat 
Sou 
reac 
full 



GL 



the 
star 
as 1: 
It \ 
wit! 
gue 

Pi 
was 
Ben 
whe 
wor 
the 
chai 
busi 
the 
ed. 

Pi 
Pres 
— H 
Rea 
Kee 
Ken 

T] 
thus 
bett 

T1 
for 
and 
Hot 
end( 
con< 
day 

T 
can, 
Whe 
first 
sive 
evei 



Ja 
at is 
a pc 
He 
ceiv 
info 
sess 
lecti 
is a 
Ucat 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE* THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1928 



PAGE THREE 



In And About The Literary Societies 



KALOZETEAN 



PHILOKOSMIAN 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



FROSH END THEIR 

APPRENTICESHIP 



The fiendish yell like shrieks from 
hell 

Echoed the whole dorm through. 
Into Quittie's heat, head first or feet, 
While muffled paddles beat 
The Freshmen's last tattoo 

* * * 

The last ceremonial rights were ad- 
ministered formally to the Freshmer. 
on Monday night a week ago. The 
ceremonies took about two hours for 
execution, as they were carried 
through in all the details according 
to Hoyle. In the vulgar campus par- 
lance this sacred ceremony is called 
"The Spring Roundup." It is said 
however, that none of the beauties 
or impressiveness of the affair is lost 
by the profanity of the common ref- 
erence and name. 

Now that these last ceremonies are 
over, technically there are no Fresh- 
men ftt Lebanon Valley. Nominally, 
however, there are still errands to 
run and a group that does the runn- 
ing. As usual it is impossible to im- 
press upon this group that they are 
passi 13 through the most wonderful 
and happiest period of their whole 
'lives. 

It is not permitted that the report- 
er shall divulge all the details and the 
ceremonial rights which long years 
of respect and tradition have practi 
ally deified. Yet it can be said that 
the ceremonies were administered 
under the starry canopy of heaven, 
about the mystical hour of midnight. 
Like the moon, the ceremonies had 
their quarters. First quarter West 
Hall, second at North Hall, third at 
South Hall, and by the time thev 
reached the Quittie they possessed a 
full shining moon. 



GLEE CLUB HOLDS 

BANQUET AT CHEF'S 

(Continued From Page 1) 

the speeches. Behney, the President, 
started off with a speech that served 
as both introductory and valedictory. 
It was savored, as his speeches are, 
with the usual wit and humor. The 
guests were then called on for talks. 

President Gossard led off and he 
was followed by Drs. Butterwick, 
Bender, Bennett, and Wagner, all of 
whom spoke commendably of the 
work of the club this year. Then 
the officers of the club were given a 
chance to do their stuff. A short 
business meeting followed in which 
the officers for next year were elect- 
ed. They are as follows: 

President — Russell C. Oyer, Vice 
President-John W. Beattie, Secretary 
— Harold Rider, Treasurer — Luther 
Rearick, Business Manager — Calvin 
Keene, Assistant Business Manager — 
Kenneth Russell. 

The affair ended with everyone en- 
thusiasic about the prospects of a 
better club next year. 

The club furnished entertainment 
for the members of the Kiwanis club 
a nd their wives at a banquet held in 
Hotel Weimer in Lebanon May 8 and 
ended its successful season with the 
concert given in Cornwall on Tues- 
day May 15. 



Two hundred "dads" invaded the 
campus of Lafayette College recently 
When the institution sponsored the 
first annual "Dad's Day". An exten- 
sive program kept the fathers busy 
every moment. 



James W. Armstrong, dean of men 
a t Northwestern University, is now in 
a position to win a popularity contest. 

acknowledges that a student re- 
ceives more benefit (or should we say 
^formation) from the so-called "bull 
sessions" than from many formal 
lectures or class room recitations. He 
ls a strong advocate of informal ed- 
ucation. 



COURTMEN WIN AND 

LOSE IN CONTESTS 



The local tennis team was defeated 
by Dickinson net men on Saturday, 
May 12. The score was 6-0, our men 
losing every match. The results 
were: — 

Englebach, Dickinson defeated Shrov- 
er 7-5, 3-6, 6-2. 

Asbegast, Dickinson defeated Hertz- 
ler 6-4, 6-4, 

Brodsky, Dickinson defeated Eberly 
6-1, 6-1. 

Green, Dickinson defeated Rank 8-6- 
6-3. 

Englebach and Arbegast defeated 
Shroyer and Hertzler 4-6, 7-5 8-6. 
Brodsky and Green defeated Oyer an<; 
Eberly 4-6, 8-6, 6-3. 
On Friday, May 18 the tennis team 
staged a walkaway over Elizabeth- 
town by defeating them 6-0, This 
was the first victory of the season. 
The Elizabethtown boys put up a 
good fight but none of them had a 
look-in on a match. They were com- 
pletely outclassed. 

The results: 
Shroyer defeated Beahin, Elizabeth- 
town 6-1, 6-4 . 
Hertzler defeated Kaylor Elizabeth- 
town 7-5, 6-2. 
Fink defeated Jacobs, Elizabethtown 

6-3, 12-10. 
Eberly defeated Hoffman, Elizabeth- 
town 6-3, 62. 
Ebeviy and Fink defeated Kaylor and 

Hoffman 6-4, 6-4. 
Shroyer and Hertzler defeated Beahin 
and Couthomel 6-2 7-5. 



A REQUEST 



Dr. G. D. Gossard recently sent the 
following communication to the edi- 
tor: — 

"My dear Mr. Beattie: 

I would like to have you announce 
through the La Vie Collegienne, that 
the college will greatly appreciate 
the aid of the various literary and 
other societies that will help in pur- 
chasing equipment and curtains for 
the stage in the Chapel. 

The Philokosmian Society very 
graciously sent a check for fifty doll- 
ars and expressed appreciation for 
the greatly improved condition ob- 
tained in the re-furnishing of the 
Chapel and entire building. We are 
happy indeed for this expression of 
good-will. 

Several of the Literary Societies 
and other organizations, have ex- 
pressed a desire to assist. We trust 
that all will help as far as possible. 
It will be greatly appreciated by all 
concerned and especially by the 
college authorities. 

Sincerely 

G. D. GOSSARD 

This lettei needs no added expla- 
nation, but the rapid approach of 
Commencement makes it very timely. 



WALLACES ENTERTAIN 
READERS AND WRITERS 



Dr. and Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace en- 
tertained the members of the Read- 
ers' and Writers' Clubs on Monday 
evening, May 21 at eight o'clock in 
their home, proving themselves very 
capable and entertaining hosts to the 
students as well as to the several 
faculty members who were guests. 
The parlor was one maize of blue 
pink, yellow, green and red baby 
ribbon with a numbered card at on • 
end and a limerick on the other. Each 
person unraveled one of the cards 
after which the limericks were read. 
Then those persons having the same 
number formed a group and gave a 
charade to represent the name of a 
book. Various other guessing con- 
tests followed, from which much fun 
and laughter was derived. Many 
limericks jokes, stunts, and conun- 
drums were given by the various 
guests. At a late hour refreshments 
were served. 



On Thursday, May 17, Kalo elected 
officers for the Fall term of next 
year, Archie Lutz was chosen Presi- 
dent; James Hazelton, Vice President,; 
and Wayne Sparrow was elected to 
the very important office of Treasur- 
er for the year. Robert Roudabush, 
a Minersville recruit this year, was 
made Recording Secretary for next 
fall. Arba Disney will be the Cor- 
responding Secretary, and Lester 
Kauffman has been elected Chaplain, 
while Lawrence Derickson is Critic. 
The Messrs. Knoll and Salada will 
preside as first and second Pianists. 
Joseph Hutchinson, another of the 
new men this year, has been made 
Editor of Examiner. Sergeants-at- 
Arms are William Spangler and Peter 
Kralick. 

The new President Mr, Lutz, has 
been one of Kalo's most active men 
in the past three years; and in mak- 
ing him president Kalo feels that she 
has used very good judgment. 



PRAYER SERVICE IS 

HELD ALONG QUITTIE 

On Tuesday evening, May 15 the 
folks who attend the Student Prayer 
meeting hiked down to the "Quittie" 
to enjoy a meeting out in the ope i. 
Ruth Cooper had charge of the pro- 
gram, which opened by singing 
"Praise God From Whom All Bless- 
ings Flow," Millard Miller read the 
scripture lesson after which Emma 
Schaffer read some very inspiring- 
poetry. Alice Kindt brought a very 
helpful message and Anna Leidig 
read more poetry. Then followed a 
number of sentence prayers after 
which there was singing. In closing 
everyone gathered in a circle of si- 
lent prayer and then were dismissed 
by Ruth Cooper. 

HOUSE PARTY OF "Y" 

CABINETS IS HELD 

(Continued from page 1) 

tive recreations. Saturday evening 
roller seating, and a storm were 
the features. Sunday morning, Mrs. 
Bennett led the group with a talk on 
the Sunday School lesson. Sunday 
noon Dr. Bennett started an inspiring- 
discussion on "sugar coated" religion, 
followed by an exceptionally good 
dinner. That afternoon various ac- 
tivities were indulged in and early 
in the evening the return trip to 
Annville was made. 

JUNIORS PLACE THE 

QUITTIES ON SALE 

(Continued from Page 1) 

the third year group. There are a 
number of new features, such as new 
pictu.es of our faculty and our Presi- 
dent separate pages for pictures of 
the class officers of both semesters, 
and the addition of the programs 
given by the Men's Glee Club and the 
Eurydice Club. 

Everyone who has not received his 
Quittie is asked to call at the La Vie 
Office as soon as possible or to see 
Archie Lutz, the business manager. 



The student council of the Univer- 
sity of Akron has found a method of 
enforcing freshman rules without us- 
ing force, All freshman caught dis- 
obeying any of the rules lose their 
votes in class elections during the 
entire freshman year. 



The honor system of examinations 
at Yale College will be abolished and 
faculty supervision installed, accord- 
ing to an announcement by Dean 
Mendell, reported in the Public Led- 
ger. The action is the result of a 
vote of the student body. 



Friday evening, May 11, Philo mei 
in regular session and presented s 
pleasing program. After devotions 
by the chaplain, Slenker elucidated 
concerning "On and off the Stage." In 
connection with Mother's Day, Beattie 
spoke on "Mother". This was follow- 
ed by musical numbers by Lebo. Dr 
Bender then gave a delightful talk on 
"My Philosophy of Life". The critic'? 
remarks closed the program. 

On Friday evening, May 18, follow- 
ing the devotional exercises Sitlinger 
spoke on "Pickles" and Hunter on 
"Third Floor Front". Sneath gave 
"A Pessimist's Views of Exams" and 
A. Miller followed with "An Opti- 
uist's Views of Exams". "Living 
Thoughts" by the Editor and the 
Critic's report completed the pi j- 
gram. 

ADVANCED STUDENTS 

APPEAR IN RECITALS 

(Continued from page 1) 

art in the Annville public schools, is 
well-known for her musical ability 
and charm. She possesses a clear, 
sweet tonal quality, warmth of ex- 
pression and a pleasing stage pres- 
ence. 

Mrs, Troutman from Lebanon gave 
her listeners a real treat with her 
colorful, deep contralto voice. 

Miss Yingst, also of Lebanon, dis- 
played her skill as an organist both 
in her light numbers, and her more 
serious ones. 

Tuesday, May 15, was the date of 
the second recital. The artists were 
Olive Weigel, piano; Alcesta Slichter, 
soprano; Irene Peter, contralto; Nelda 
Spatz, soprano; Violet Walter and 
Mildred Myers organ. 

Miss Weigel played very fluently 
and easily, displaying much talent 
and ability. Miss Slichter rendered 
her selections with a warmth of ex- 
pression and fine sense of diction. 
Miss Peter, whose songs were of a 
weird character, interpreted them 
convincingly. Miss Spatz, who has 
always charmed us wih her clear, 
sweet tonal quality, acquitted herse]! ; 
nobly, especially in her interpreta- 
tion of th3 "Swiss Echo Song". Miss 
Walter and Miss Myers both have a 
clear ; even touch, and made their 
audience feel that they were a part 
of the soul of the great instrument 
they were playing. The accompany- 
ing was abiy done by Hilda Hess and 
Alcesta Slichter. 



A training table for debaters is the 
latest Harvard innovation. It is 
thought by the coaches that discus- 
sions at lunch and dinner will give 
the contestants greater opportunity 
than they now have to become 
thoroughly acquainted with the de- 
bate topics. 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville _ _ _ Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

KODAKS & SUPPLIES, FILMS. 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING - 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Printing- — Publishing- 
Advertising 
Annville Penna. 




CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. B ASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 

THE HUB 

713 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PA. 



Photographs di l h °l°*™ p , °*°"Tr! n 

J7 ©&r Forever BLAZIER & MILLER 

36 North Eighth Street. LEBANON PA 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 24, 1928 



Alumni Notes 



L. V. C. GRADUATES AT BONEBRAKE SEMINARY 



The Lebanon Valley Alumni Ban- 
quet will be held at Chef's place Junf: 
12th. Dr. Orville P. DeWitt a grad- 
uate of the class of '98 and a lawyei 
in National Park New Jersey has 
been seleced as toastmaster. Other 
mmbers of the alumni who will give 
toasts are Oliver Butterwick of York 
Penna, a graduate of L. V. in the 
class of '12 and a brother to Dr. R. 
R. Butterwick, professor of Bible and 
Philosophy at Lebanon Valley; Hel- 
en Brightbill Statton, a graduate of 
L. V. Oratory school in '12, and Vas- 
sar in '14 of Hagerstown, Md., and 
Dr. Clyde Alvin Lynch, A. B. '18 
Lebanon Valley, A. M. '25 ibid. D. 
D. ibid, pastor of Second United 
Brethren Church, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dr. C. C. Gohn B. S. '02, pastor 
of First U. B. Church of Johnstown, 
Pa. will deliver the baccalaurette ser- 
mon, Sunday, June 10th in the Col- 
lege Church. 



Faculty 



Dr Gossard, Dr. Reynolds and Prof 
Grimm visited Bucknell University. 
Lewisburg, on Friday where they at- 
tended the spring meeting of the As- 
sociation of College Professors of 
Pennsylvania. 

The Carnegie achievement tests re- 
cently given the senior classes of 
all colleges and universities in the 
state, were the most important 
topics discussed, and brought out ar. 
exchange of ideas and observations 
from the professors of education in 
the various institutions. Other sub- 
jects presented were the proposed 
changes in requirements for college 
certificates to teach and the junio' 
college movement. 

Dr. Gossard spent Sunday in Jean- 
nette, Pa., where he addressed the 
union meeting of all Protestant 
churches of that city. 



MYLINMEN COP THREE 

BATTLES IN A ROW 

(Continued from Page 1) 



er eliminated the possibility of a shut 
out for the visitors. Up until thtf 
inning, Zappia held the Red anc 
White to two scattered hits. T< 
avenge the lone tally Lebanon Val- 
ley scored three runs in their chanci; 
at bat. One run in the sixth and 
four in the seventh boosted the grand 
total to 15 

Hitting Bingamon, Shilling and 
Grace all over the lot the locals 
amassed a total of 16 hits, Local 
fans were more or less disappointed 
in the visitors, since reports were 
abroad, crediting Susquehanna with 
having a strong outfit. 

The score by innings: 

R. H. E. 

Sus. U 00013011 694 

L. V. C. __0 4 3 3 1 4 x 15 6 3 

Batteries — Bingamon, Shilling, 
Grace and Baird; Zappia and Ben- 
digo. 



Huntingdon, Pa., May 18 — 

Lebanon Valley took the first game 
in its up-State trip from Juniata here 
today. Heavy hitting by the whol - 
team featured the game for the Blue 
and White. Albright and Went", 
came thru with homers, Zappia and 
Wentz with triples, and the rest of 
the team with healthy singles. 

Tho visitors started the tallying 
with one run on Zappia's triple. To 
answer for the homesters Snydet . 
West, and Hunter crossed the plate 
making matters rather one-sided # In 
the second inning, Wentz's triple was 
cashed in on Bendigo's single, but 
Lebanon Valley could not keep its 
pace; in the same stanza Juniata also 




FROSH CLOUT BALL 

TO WIN TWO GAMES 



Back Row, left to right— C, W. Hiser, W. M. Sparks, J. Stambach, J M. 
Welty. 

Center Row— W H. Quaid, W. H. Smith, W. S. Miller, J. Bingham, J. W. 

Luckens, J. P. Gruver. 
Front Row— E. F. Shaeffer, H. Ishmura, Mrs. P. E. Cooper, P. E. Cooper, 
Mrs. J. Bingham, Mary McLanachan, Mrs. M. H. Welty. 



SENIORS: — When you come to the close of your collegiate career within o. 

very short time you will leave Lebanon Valley with a certain 

feeling of regret. But you will want to keep in touch with the. 

school and its activities^ so we ask you to fill in the blank below 

and give it to Harry L. Hovis with $1.00. 
ALUMNI: — La Vie Collegienne is the link which binds you to your Alma 

Mater, and one dollar will bring it to you for one year. Mail 

the blank and one dollar to Harry L. Hovis circulation manager, 

La Vie Collegienne, Annville, Pa. 



Be sure that I receive La Vie Collegienne regularly during 1928-29 
at the following address: 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 



scored making the score 4-2. The 
fifth showed Albright up to his old 
form when he banged out the first 
homer of the game. The game from 
then on progressed rather smoothly 
until the bang-up eighth assured the 
Mylinmen of their victory. Went'' 
breezed out a circuit clout, but un- 
fortunately no one was on base. 
Bendigo fanned but Piersol singled, 
and Piela and Zappia registered safe 
bingles to score him. The latter half 
of the ninth did not show any hope 
for the losers. 

The score by innings: 

R. H. E 

L. V. C. __0 1 1 1 2 5 10 
Juniata ' ___0 31000000 4 11 

Batteries — Piela and Bendigo; Hun- 
ter and West. 



Lewisburg, Pa., May 19 — 

On its way back from Huntingdon 
after shellacing Juniata, the Annville 
Collegians stopped off here today to 
nose out Bucknell in a slug fest 
carrying off Snavely's scalp the sec- 
cond time this season. Altho the 
visitors got only twelve safeties to the 
homesters fourteen they were able 
to turn in a score of 7-6 making a 
perfect trip of the two day jubilee. 

In the opener > the Hornets showed 
little fire, but James of Bucknell, the 
first man up, slammed out a homer 
which grazed the foul line by incht •. 
Though they turned in a variety of 
singles and doubles, Mylin's entertain - 
ers were held scoreless until the fifth. 
By the end of the fifth canto the 
Snavely men with a like number of 
runs, thought themselves to have re- 
venged their former defeat. Wentz 
broke the ice by driving in Albrigh 1 
and Disney with his slashing double. 
In the sixth chapter, Zappia got on 
with a single t and our own Paul, em- 
ulating the King of Swats, wielded 
the club for a home run, thus bring- 
ing the score to four. Both the sev- 
enth and eighth innings were blanks 
for both sides, but in the ninth when 
Groman substituted for Jacks Thomas 
let in the run which was to even tho 
score. Groman walked, Albright 
singled, Disney sacrificed, Wentz was 
thrown out at first and Bendigo filed 
out to left field. Meanwhile Eddie 
traveled the distance to put his team 
on par 

The tenth opened with a walk for 
Piela. Zappia tripled, Snyder singled 



and the first two batsmen crossed the 
home-plate with the winning runs. 
For Bucknell, Quinn gained home on 
a singie but further tallies were hope- 
less when Haldy fanned. 
The score by innings: 

r. h. r, 

L. V. C.__0 000220012 7 12 2 
Bucknell 1022000001 6 14 
Batteries — Zappia and Bendigo; 
Thomas and Restelli. 



FAREWELL PARTY IS 

TENDERED SENIORS 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Pep featured the entire affair. 
There was no slump but rather an in- 
crease in enjoyment during the stav 
at Chef's. A good appetite had beer 
been cleverly worked up by vigoroas 
participation in the contests so that 
nary a Senior failed to do justice to 
the enticing chicken supper that was 
offered. 

Dr. Gossard made a few simple re- 
marks after which the class enthus- 
iastically cherred the host and hostess 
The party t like all good things had to 
come to an end. Again the profs 
dutifully appeared with their shining 
chariots and escorted the happy, 
beaming Seniors to their respective 
dwelling places. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



Sinc(> theil debut with the Soph- 
Frosh game, the Freshman nine hav • 
had two other lively contests On 
Thursday, May 10 they trimmed th3 
Annville High club with an 11-8 
score. The High boys were outplay- 
ed in every sense of the word. The 
Frosh clouted the ball all over the 
field and ran a rampage which com- 
pletely woxed the school boys. This 
was a practice game for the Frosh. 

Last Saturday the club journeyed 
to Lykens to play the Lykens High 
School. This High School received 
the same kind of trouncing that the 
Frosh gave the Annville boys, the 
score ending at 10-2. Johnson was 
the big hitter, knocking out two 
doubles, a tripple and a homer. Wel- 
ker pitched a neat game holding 
down the Lykens team to seven hits. 
The infield worked especially smooth 
and gave the pitcher more than the 
needed support The whole team is 
showing more teamwork and shows 
promises of a bright future. The 
score by innings. 

R H E 

Frosh 24001111 10 12 2 

Lykens —0 00010100 2 73 



Wholesale revision of the Columbia 
University curriculum within the next 
year and the probable introduction 
of "snap" courses was discussed by 
Dean Herbert E. Hawkes in an alum- 
ni talk. Dean Hawkes said that a 
committee is considering the intro- 
duction of "snap" courses and he 
favors the movement. He told the 
alumni that "if the system is put 
through as I favor it some of the 
best lecturers in college will give 
courses two or three times a week for 
which there will be no examinations 
and for which half credit will be 
given. I think this will serve to ac- 
quaint the students with the subject 
matter of the course without having 
them bother to an unnecessary de- 
gree about preparing for examina- 
tions" — New Student Service 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumla- and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 



LEBANON, 



Opposite Post Office 



PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 
iTXTmvmr„r„ ^ VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 

UNION EMBLEM CO palmyra, pa. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS— TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



HOOKS and STATIONERY 



STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 



THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE. PA- 



GOODBYE AND 
GOOD LUCK 
SENIORS! 



Mie €olk(}iennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



WE WELCOME 
RETURNING 
ALUMNI 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 1928 



NUMBER 



lb 



MYLINMEN DEFEAT ML ST. MARY'S IN RETURN 
ENGAGEMENT AND END SUCCESSFUL SEASON 

Locals Win Nine, Lore Four And Tie One In Fourteen Starts; 
Wentz Tops Hitters With An Average Of .338; 
Bendigo Leads In Homers 



In closing its athletic season for the 
term by trouncing Mt. St. Mary's in 
a comeback baseball game, Lebanon 
Valley hung u}. a row of nine scalps, 
tying one game, losing four, and con- 
celling three on account of rain. The 
record for the year shewed the higr 
calibre of the Lebanon Valley team 

Through graduation, one berth of 
the nine will be vacated, and thai b, 
Paul Piersol, captain of the team 
grid star, basket-ball letter man, and 
first sacker for the Blue and White 
In his four years of base ball, Paul 
has made an enviable record for him- 
self. 

The pitching stair for the ye"' 
composed of Piela and Zappia, both 
veterans whom Hooks will have for 
his next year's club. Joe Abrarp — 
had little opportunity to exhibit his 
real twirling ability, pitching only 
the last two innings of the Mt. S,. 
Mary's game played at Emmittsburg. 
(Continued on page 4.) 



SENIOR CAST GIVES 
AN EXCELLENT PLAY 

Jerome's "Passing Of The Thirr' 
Floor Back" Pleases Large 
Audience 



The Seniors established a precedeni 
in college history on Thursday night 
May 24, when they presented the play. 
"Passing of the Third Floor Back", 
by Jerome K. Jerome, entirely direct- 
ed and produced by members of their 
own class. 

The scene of the play is laid in the 
living-room of a common London 
boarding house. Here the boarders 
gather to gossip in the late afternoon 
while their landlay pours their tea 
and passes around the cream which 
she has diluted with water. They 
are a quarrelsome, discontented 
group. A swaggering, useless major 
leads a miserable life with his scold- 
ing wife. They have a beautiful 
daughter whom the major endeavors 
to marry to a wealthy bachelor board- 
(Continued on Page 3) 



COURTMEN AGAIN BOWL 
OVER ELIZABETHTOWN 



On Friday, May 25, Lebanon Valley 
defeated Elizabethtown College by 
the score of 6-1 in a well played ten- 
nis match. Following are the scores- 
I Shroyer defeated Beahm, Elizabeth- 
town 7-5, 4-6, 6-1. 

Hertzler defeated Overdorf, Eliza- 
bethtown 6-3, 6-1. 

Fink defeated Jacobs, Elizabeth- 
town 6-0, 7-5. 

Cassel, Elizabethtown defeated Eb- 
erly 6-3, 2-6, 7-5. 

Rank defeated Dieter, Klizabeth- 
town 7-5, 3,6, 6-3. 

Hertzler and Shroyer defeated 
Beahm and Crouthamel 6-4, 6-3. 

Fink and Eberly defeated Cassel 
and Hoffman 6-3, 6-3. 

This game closed our tennis season 
for this year. 



SOCIETIES MEET IN 
TWO JOINT SESSIONS 

Delphian Entertains Clio While 
Kalo Is Host To 
Philo 



On Friday evening, May 25 Del- 
phian and Clionian Literary Societies 
joined ranks in an interesting meet- 
ing held in Delphian hall. In spite of 
the fact that the orchestra was forced 
to cancel its engagement the evening 
was an enjoyable one throughout. 

After the greetings from Delphian 
to Clio were given by Kathryn Flinch- 
baugh, Ruby Ann See opened the 
program with a humorous reading, 
which was followed by a piano duet 
by Ruth Strubhar and Hilda Hess. 
Another good laugh was given the 
audience when many became objects 
of lively jokes at the hands of Olive 
Morrow and Gladys Knaub. 

The skit, directed by Esther Ang- 
stadt and Irene Schrope proved to be 
the ace of the evening. As it was the 
last program for both societies, the 
Seniors were given one last chance 
to observe the peculiarities of a few 
of our faculty members. The im- 
(Cortinued on page 3) 



RECITALS ARE GIVEN 
BY MUSICSTUDENTS 

Last Of This Year's Spring 
Recitals Presented In 
Engle Hall 



The third of the series of spring 
recitals by the advanced students of 
the Conservatory was held Tuesday 
evening, May 22, in Engle Hall. The 
performers were Grace Daniel, organ 
Hilda Hess, mezzo-soprano; Gladys 
Carrenda, soprano, and Alcesta Slieli- 
ter piano. 

Miss Daniel is as charming and 
talented at the organ as we have ob- 
served her previously at the piano. 
Her last number, a Concert Study by 
Yon, was especially well played, and 
caused her to leave with her audience 
the impression that she was actually 
living the music. 

Miss Calendar's songs, "Victorious, 
Victorious", by Carissimi,, and "Car- 
mena", a light Spanish number by 
Wilson, were of widely different char- 
act er, and were appropriately inter- 
preted. 

Miss Hess possesses a very low, res- 
onant voice, and rendered her selec- 
tions with a warmth of expression, 
and clarity of enunciation. 

Miss Slichter's most remarkable 
feature was her perfect composure 
and attitude of naturalness while on 

the stage. 

The accompanists were Olive Wei- 
gel and Alcesta Slichter. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



DEATH CLAIMS GREAT 
FRIEND OF L. V. C. 



B. Church Loses) A Great 
Leader In Passing Of 
Bishop Washinger 



Bishop W. H. Washinger, who died 
recently at Dayton, Ohio, was one of 
our own Lebanon Valley men. He re- 
ceived his B.A. at this school in 1891, 
his M. A. in 1896 and his DD. degree 
in 1906. 

Although Bishop Washinger spent 
his latter years in the West, this vi- 
cinity was the field of his earlier 
labors. He preached at the First U. 
B. Church, Harrisburg, three years, 
and at the First U. B. Church, Cham- 
bersburg, eight years. He was then 
elected Superintendent of the Penn- 
sylvania Annual Conference and held 
that position for fifteen years. 

He won his crOwning achievement 
in 1917 when he was elected to the 
bishopric, having charge of the Paci- 
fic Coast district. This position he 
held at the time of his death. 

The attainments of Bishop Wash- 
inger are certainly a credit and an 
honor to Lebanon Valley. He was 
not only an able preacher and a great 
leader, but he was also a friend of 
education and especially of the insti- 
tution he claimed as his Alma Mater. 

His wife, Romaine Funkhouser 
Washinger, who survives him, was 
also a former student of this college 
in the Department of Art. 



MAY SENIORS TO 
TEACH NEXT YEAR 



Twenty-Four To Be Instructors 
While Two Will Enter 
Other Work 



A large percentage of the member 1 - 
of the senior class have already ob- 
tained positions for next year. Fol- 
lowing is a list of those reported 
when La Vie went to press: 

Fredrica Baker will teach at South 
Fork, Penna. 

O. Pass Bollinger will teach at 
Highland Falls, N. Y. 

Henry Brubaker will teach at Eph- 
rata, Penna. 

Benetta Burrier will teach at Lititz, 
Penna. 

Catherine Craven will teach at 
Bound Brook, N. J. 

(Continued on page 3) 



KIEHNER CHOSEN TO 

HEAD MEN'S SENATE 



The members of the new Men's 
Senate met in the College President's 
office on Thursday, May 24 to vote 
off the tie between Miller and Kiehn- 
er for President for the coming year. 
Kiehner was chosen, and Miller wa- 
elected vice president on the first 
ballot. 

The Freshman rules will be prac - 
tically the same as ihis year with a 
few changes. It was decreed that: 
Freshman shall at all times use the 
pear doors of the Administration 
Building and the Conservatory. If 
was also decided that the incoming 
Frosh shall wear garters. 



SEVENTY THREE W 
SECOND ANNOA 



LL GRADUATE IN SIXTY- 
. COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 



Senior Class Activities To End Wednesday With Awarding Ol 
Diplomas; Full Program Of Events Will Claim 
Attention During Final Four Days 



CLASS DAY WILL BE 
ENTERTAINING AFFAIR 



Varied Program Will Feature 
Traditional Celebration 
By The Seniors 



Class-day exercises, a tradition of 
Lebanon Valley College practically as 
old as the college itself, will be held 
in the Engle Conservatory on Tues- 
day, June 12 at 2:00 P. M. 

The Class of '28 has not divulged 
very explicitly just wha events will 
take place at that time. From this 
fact it is safe to conclude that they 
are going to be extremely novel and 
interesting. The La Vie reporter was 
given the following information bj 
way of the general program arrange- 
ment: 

The first part will be the Class 
Song, written especially for the oc- 
casion to portray the life and activity 
of the Class of '28. Then the second 
part will be in the nature of light 
opera or perhaps a musical comedy 
or two interspersed with skits. The 
titles of these parts are "The Lands 
of Suppressed Desires," "Hollywood," 
"Grand Opera," "Pedagogy," "Know- 
(Continued on Page 3) 



GRADUATES WILL WED 
IN COLLEGE CHURCH 

Jennie Shoop, '27, Will Become 
Bride of Wade Miller, '27, 
On Saturday 



Another one of Lebanon Valley 
College's romances will culminate 
Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock in 
the college church when Miss Jennie 
Elizabeth Shoop of Millersburg, Pa., 
will become the bride of Wade Seller . 
Miller of Staunton, Va. The nuptial 
rites will be performed by Dr. G. D 
Gossard, president of the college, as- 
sisted by Rev. J. Owen Jones, college 
pastor. Miss Helen Longenecker, '26 
will officiate at the organ while Mis; 
Mary Houck, '25 will sing several 
solos. 

Miss Shoop's sister, Miss Madie 
Shoop, '25, will be bridesmaid and Mr. 
Miller's brother, Millard Miller, '28. 
will act as best man. Every one as- 
sisting in any way in the ceremony is 
a graduate of Lebanon Valley. 

The ceremony will be private and 
informal, after which the bridal party 
will motor to the home of the bride 
in Millersburg. At a later date, the 
bride and groom will motor to Wash- 
ington,points of interest in the east 
ern part of Virginia, and finally t< 
Staunton, Va., the home of the groom. 
From Staunton, they will return by 
way of Pittsburgh, to Dayton, ().. 
where they will attend the Seminary 
next fall. 



The Sixty-Second Annual Com- 
mencement of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege will be held on June 13th. At this 
time one of the largest classes ever to 
graduate from the college will re- 
ceive their degrees. The awarding of 
degrees and the Commencement or- 
ation will be held at 10:15 A. M., in 
the College United Brethren Church. 

The orator is Mr. Louis K. Ans- 
pacher, LL.D., of New York City. 
Mr. Anspacher is a foremost speaker 
and lecturer on the American plat- 
form, and no doubt that he will do 
the occasion credit. Following the 
address, President, G. D. Gossard 
will confer the degrees, and this is 
followed by the awarding of prizes. 
The music for the program will be 
under the direction of the Conserva- 
tory of music. 

There are seventy-two candidates 
in the college proper and one in the 
Conservatory of Music to receive de- 
(Continued on page 3) 



CLASSES COMPLETE 
CHOICE OF OFFICERS 

Miller, '29, Snyder, '30, And 
Wood, '31 Chosen For 
First Semester 



The three returning classes on the 
campus have completed the election 
of their officers to carry them 
through the first half of next year. 
Frederick Miller was elected presi- 
dent of the incoming Seniors; John 
Snyder, president of the Juniors whil-; 
Joe Wood will assume the role of 
Sophomore president. 

The other officers of the Senior 
class will be: Vice President, Mae 
Hamer; Secretary, Miriam Hershey; 
Treasurer, Lanston Mentzer; and As- 
sistant Treasurer, Mildred Ulmholtz. 

The Juniors have selected Kathryn 
Hagner for Vice President and 
Blanche Cochran to act as secretary, 
while Willi am Myers will fill the im- 
portant office of Treasurer with the 
(Continued on Page 2.) 



SUMMER SCHOOL WILL 

REOPEN ON JUNE 25 



Lebanon Valley College Summer 
School will be held June 25 to August 
3. Courses will again be offered in 
Harrisburg at the Edison Junior High 
building and in regular College build- 
ings at Annville. The regular College 
faculty will instruct. 

The courses offered will practically 
be the same at both places. These 
include: Bible, Chemistry, Education 
and Psychology, English, French, His- 
tory, Mathematics, Social Science, 
Athletic Coaching will be given t 
Annville and Field and Laboratory 
work in Biology at Mt. Gretna. Sum- 
mer School is a great opportunit y I'm 
teachers to reach requirements for 
Certificates, for those desiring college 
entrance, and for those working for 
degrees. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. THURSDAY, JUNK 7, 



laiie€ollQienn$ 

PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 

JOHN W. BEATTIE, '29. 
Associate Editors 

CAROL E. BRINSER, '29 MILES S. KIEHNER, '9b 

General Reporters 

JOHN W. SNYDER, '30 ESTHER ANGSTADT, '30 

RUSSELL E. MORGAN, '31 

Conservatory M. ALCESTA SLICkTER, '30 

Athletics NORMAN VANDERWALL, '3. 

Clionian GLADYS M. KNAUB, '3(, 

Delphian RUTH A. STRUBHAR, '2'J 

Kalozetean JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

Philokosmian CHARLES H .WISE, '31 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 

L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Associate Business Manager J. CALVIN KEENE, '30 

Circulation Manager HARRY L. HOVIS, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year — Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 

1 EDITORIALS [ 

* ............ . ,.~ ............. » 

THE DEMAND OF YOUTH 

The rise and fall of the tide of Time each year demands the 
efficiency alacrity and capability of youth the world over. Not 
only in the common walks of life, but in every pinnacle of a- 
chievement this. cry is forever heard: "give us skilled and trained 
young" people." 

Training- of all kind;? naturally finds its beginning in the 
homlc, but it broadens its scope as people gradually take their 
places in the revolving wheels of industry, science, law and in- 
deed every conceivable phase of mechanism which we term 
"progress." 

No matter ho'w dark the outlook; by employing our personal 
attributes of perseverance, loyalty and the burning desire to eve* 
pusji forward, there is nothing - that cannot be attained. By as- 
sociation of young folks in schools, colleges and business enter- 
prises the needs of communities and the country as a whole are 
met, defined and overcome. Consequently, the young people be- 
gin to Heel that they truly have a vital share in the advance- 
ment of local and national affairs. 

Therefore, as situdents of Lebanon Valley, some great re- 
sponsibility will rest upon usj. Are we going to prove our worth 
and initiative? We dare not fail. Let us ever keep this motto 
before us: A bigger and better America through her youth. 

Let's go! 



RECITALS ARE GIVEN 

BY MUSIC STUDENTS 

(Continued from Pafje 1) 



MEMORIAL DAY 

One of the finest and most revered of our National traditions 
is the honoring of our soldier-dead on Memorial Day of each 
year. The nation as a whole renews its trust with those who fell 
lighting for their country by solemnizing the day with fitting 
commemoration of the final resting place of the Unknown Soldier 
at t lib Arlington National Cemetery, Every city and town in 
this nation individually pledges anew its faith and that of its 
country to the covenant of International Peace, perpetuating the 
cause for which the flower of our country has on numerous OC 
casions sacrificed its Life, 

Just ten years have passed since the greatest conflict the 
world has ever known was brought to a close, but not without 
its fearful toll of millions of human lives. Drawn into this 
great catstrophe our country sent its best to dispute our cause. 
HOW effectively they accomplished their task is told, not in 
words, but deeds. 

To-day the same fields which once were a living hell have 
l>een converted into acres of grass-covered mounds, each mdicat 

ing with a white cross the grave of a fallen soldier. Among 
these are men. w ho represented us, but did not yet know our lan 
guage. Monies* and families from all over our country hav< 
fallen sons and brothers resting there. Schools and colleges and 
universities also honor their dead on foreign fields. Lebanon 
Valley has men who died heroes on French fields of war, 

Memorial Day has| passed, and the monuments ON OUR 
CAMPUS lo our hero dead lying in foreign soil have received 
not so much as passing recognition, a wreath, a small token in 
h n »r of the pledge lor which they died- for we forgot. Further 
in breaking faith wit 1 i our soldier alumni we hav'e broken faith 
with the families from which they come. To say the least, 
our inacl i< mi has been disrespect ful. 

It is sincerely hoped that Memorial Day will receive as im- 
portant a place in College activities as others of much less im- 
portance are receiving now. This condition should not exist in 
coming years. 



The recital on Saturday, May 26, 
was t^iven by Hilda Hess, piano; MerU 
Becker, soprano; Leah Miller, lyric 
soprano; Wesley Carpenter, basso 
cantino and Christine Evans and 
Ruth Strubhar, ort>an. 

Miss Hess, in her numbers, showed 
a pleasing combination of pianistic 
talent and artistic musicianship. She 
was at her best in the Brahm's "Rhap- 
sody". 

Miss Becker, a promising young 
singer, possesses a voice of rare rich- 
ness and tonal quality. Her presen- 
tation of "Morning Serenade", by 
Edwards, was especially fine. 

Miss Miller, also possesses a rich, 
sweet soprano voice and gave her 
audience a treat. Her songs repre- 
sented a variety of moods, which 
were expressed with a true warmth 
of feeling. Her best number was 
"Lo! Hear the Gentle Lark", by Bis- 
hop, in which her remarkable sense 
of pitch was displayed. 

Mr. Carpenter, a basso of rare tal- 
ent and wide fame, held his audience 
spell-bound while he lived for them, 
with the aid of his rich, flexible voice 
the well-loved poem and song "Gunga 
Din." His interpretation of "Little 
Grey Home in the West" was no less 
perfect, although an entirely differ- 
ent type of song. 

Christine Evans and Ruth Strubhar 
both played with much beauty of ex- 
pression and clarity of technic. 

The accompanying was artistically 
done by Alcesta Slichter, Olive Wei- 
gel, and Violet Walter. 

A recital was given Monday, May 
28, by Hilda Hess, organ; Mary Hartz, 
piano; Doris James, soprano, Benetta 
Burrier, soprano, Myrle Turby, so- 
prano and June Gingrich, violin. 

Miss Hess, an accomplished organ- 
ist, exhibited a pleasing variety of 
musical interpretation. "The Squirrel" 
a light, fantastic number, was pre- 
sented in an especially pleasing man- 
ner. 

Miss Hartz, a pianist of fine talent 
and training, displayed a splendid 
sense of rhythm a clear, mellow tonal 
quality, and an excellent technic, as 
well as warmth of expression. 

Miss James, a young singer of Leb- 
anon, possessing a voice of rare brill- 
iancy and sweetness, sang "Children 
of the Moon", a fantasy by Warren, 
and "Spring's Awakening", by Sand- 
erson, in a delightful way. 

Miss Burrier, a well-known soprano 
was distinguished by her delightful 
stage presence and charming person- 
ality. Her songs, all of widely differ- 
ent moods, were sung with a depth 
of expression. 

Miss Turby, a rich, lyric soprano, 
presented all of her selections with 
equal artistry. 

Miss Gingrich, a budding violinist, 
played a Concertino by Adolf Hubei 
with surprising firmness and fluency 
She displayed also a fine tonal quality 
and breadth of style, all of which 
qualities point toward a brilliant fu- 
ture for her. 

The accompanying was ably done 
by Grace Daniel and Violet Walter. 

The last of the regular series of re- 
citals was held Thursday, May 31. 
The artists were Mildred Myers, piano; 
Viola Wolf, organ; May G rum bine 
soprano; Alcesta Slichter, violin; Rob- 
ert Knoll, tenor and David K. Shroy- 
er, baritone. 

Miss Myers, a pianist of rare ar- 
tistic ability, charmed her audience 
with her interpretation of some of 
the old masters. 

Viola Wolf exhibited her mastery 
of the organ in a Sonata by Barowski, 
and a group of .solos. Her keen imag- 
ination and poetic quality of expres- 
sion, whether the mood were broad, 
light, or romantic, were very evident. 

Miss Grumbine sang two Italian se- 
lections, "Amarilli" by Caccini, and 
"Danza, Fanciulla Gentile," by Du- 




'0 wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!' 



—BURNS 



Bollinger went to New York with Professor Crawford re- 
cently, An irate policeman stopped I 'ass and lined him twenty- 
one dollars ($21.00). "The woman pays", they say, but that time 
Crawford did. 



STILL DAZED 

Professor Reynolds (two weeks after) — "Have you all seen 
the Carnegie Achievement Tests?" 

"Rabbit" Miller (politely) "I-I think 1 did but I'm not s*ure. 



WE WOULD LIKE TO KNOW 

Chubby wanted to "get his psychology assignment straight} 
Casting an inquiring eye around the library and raising his 
voice, he bellowed, " 'Intelligence' — hey, is that what I've got?" 



We hear that Bechtlel has even gone so far as to buy Violet 
Life Savers. 



We wonder why the "Perfect Lover" reserves his parlor 
tricks for the street. 



Miss Wallace — "What is a metaphor?" 
Joe Abrahams — "To keep cows in." 



Dr. Wallace — "Hcrtzler, have you read 'Beowolf?" 
Ed — "No, I don't like animal stories". 



"Tex" Hamer — "I keep thinking- that exams are almost over." 
Jane — "They are." 

"Tex" — "I know, that's why I keep thinking they are," 



Dot — "Do you believe in auto-suggestion?" 
Cal— "Yes." 

Dot— "All right, let's go for a ride." 



Jit — "I want a new belt." 
Clerk— "How long?" 

Jit — "I wanta buy it, ye darn fool, not borrow it." 



Mike — "Are you and Bernita pretty thick?" 
Archie — "Sure." 

Mike — "That's all right. We can't all be bright." 



Herbie— "Who's that dizzy looking girl in the blue dress? M 
Hoy — "Do you mean my sister?" 

Herbie — "No, the other one. The one in the red dress." 



"Kit" — "Say, can't you take a joke?" 
"Dave" — "Sure, where do you want to go?" 



It is nothing- fljiort of miraculous when am- sort of notice 
remains on our bulletin boards for any length of time without 
being marked up, 



BIBLE 14 GEMS 

Christianity according to my definition is a simple faith of 
a simple man for a very much complex, omnipresent, omnipotent, 
omniscient Hieavenly Being. Mystery Religions, (And again 
my own definition.) A showy and obtrusive complex faith in a 
simple and purely abstract coat of bronze by a simpleton, 

The slaves were treated very cruel and worked very hard, 
hey often worked under leathers, 



And w hen Christ came to wash Peter's feet, Peter said, "Nol 
mv feet onlv, but my face and hands are dirty too." 



ante in a pleasing style. 

Miss Slicbter a^ain possessed a fine 
Stage presence, and with her violin 
put the audience into the varied 
moods of reverence, (in Barowski's 
"Adoration"), the old-fashioned sw:iy 
of the minuet, and a lively Polish 
1 lance. 

Mr. Knoll possesses a tenor voice 
of exceptional richness, beauty, and 
flexibility, lie rendered his songs 
with an artistic finish, and a great 
depth of feeling 

Mr. Shroyor, a well-known bari- 
tone, as usual, added chain) to the 
program with his deep, mellow tonal 
quality. 



CLASSES COMPLETE 

CHOICE OF OFFICERS 

(Continued from Page 1) 



help of Gladys Knaub acting as F*" 
nancial Secretary. At the same time 
Ruth Cooper was choosen to repre- 
sent the class for the entire year on 
the Student-Faculty Committee. 

Ruth Liller has been selected as 
Vice President for the incoming Sopn- 
omores. Sarah Ensminger will be 
Secretary with Charles Wise Treasur- 
er of the same crew. 



SEV1 



orees. 

A. B. 
de£i' c 
cation 
£con< 
gervat 

The 
gree : 

Har 
flehne 
Mays 
Chart 
Heise; 
Lloyd 

MiH ;li 
Nitrai 

Edgiu 
Byron 
rick a 
baker 
erine 
gheim 
G>lga 
Geyer 
Grace 
Berni< 
Kindt 
erine 
Beryl 
Paine. 
Lou ] 
Rebec 
Viola 
Tho 

B. S. , 
Chn 

Bollin 

Ralph 

Shenl< 

Ivan ] 

Henrj 

Kuhn, 

ward 

Home 

Zwall. 

coin I 

The 
B. S. 

Pau 
son F 
James 
Kob, 
Schell 
F. Ms 
Gertr 

The 
are: 

Pan 
cis W 

Anc 
Music 
receh 
diploi 

M01 
annur 
not y 
1 nounc 
One 
j beaut 
I ley C. 
and I 
beaut 
adds 
Were 
have 
Past, 
their 
Whicr 
the I, 
Mr. 
'b-ato 
of '28 

The 
c ert t 
Vance 
Wil| i 

at eit 
(range 

Soloi s 
V iola 

Oyer 
win 1 
as W e 
I fine , 

Who 

^nit 3 
v ear. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 1928 



PAGE THREE 



SEVENTY-THREE 

WILL GRADUATE 

(Continued from page 1) 



grees. Fourty are candidates for the 
^ B. degree; nineteen for the B. S 
|egree; eleven for the B. S. in Edu- 
cation degree; two for the B. S. in 
economics degree; and one for Con 
ge rvalory of Music diploma. 

The candidates for the A. B. de- 
gree are as follows: 

Harry Darkes Albright, John Bruce 
Behney, Henry Yost Brubaker, Jacob 
Jlays I loi ls, Elmer Adam Keiser 
gharles Milford Knisley, Raymond 
Heincy Koch, Raymond Earl Kuhnert 
Lloyd Henry Lux, Samuel Meyei 
Millard Joseph Miller, Harvey Lp- 
(jitrauer, Walter Daniel Pugh, Walter 
Edgar Waggoner, Floyd B. Whistler 
gyron Wilbur Sheetz, Louisa Fivd- 
ricka Baker, Mabel Catherine Brew- 
baker, Benetta Eleanor Burrier, Cath- 
erine Craven, Marian Bowman Dor- 
s heimer, Kathrvn Anna Flinchbaugh 
Olga Sara Freeman, Mary Margare 
Geyer, Olivette Lydia Hass, Mabc 1 
Grace Hafer,, Gladys S. L. Happel 
Bernice Amos Hoover, Alice Jennir 
Kindt, Frances H. Long, Anna Cath- 
erine Mark, Emma Rebecca Meyer 
Beryl Deborah Orth, Helen Elizabeth 
Paine, Elsie Margaret Reider, Sarr 
Lou Rose, Ruby Ann See, Eleano* 
Rebecca Snoke, Mary Nelda Spats 
Viola Mae Wolf. 

Those who are candidates for the 
B. S. degree are as follows: 

Charles Ray Bell, Jr., Aran Pas- 
Bollinger, Joseph Charles Bruno 
Ralph Albert Daubert, Abraham 
Shenk Dohner, J. Paul Dohner, Ro , 
Ivan Flinchbaugh, Roy Seibert Flook 
Henry Allison Kohler, Rondo Uh 
Kuhn, Monroe Hsrnish Martin, Ed- 
ward J. 0. Orbock, David Herr Ran*. 
Homer Castle Schwalm, Arnold Hurst 
Zwally, George Paul Moser, Myrl Lm 
coin Brown, Edna Catherine Grahfur 

Theose who are candidates for the 
B. S. in Education are: 

Paul Alexander Elberti, Earl Wil- 
son Fornwalt, George Clifford Singlev 
James Dewey Wallace, John Fric^e v 
Kob, Paul Revere Carl, Irene June 
Scbell, Luella Mae Burkholder, Edn-' 
F. Mann, Laura E. Garman, Isabella 
Gertrude Griffith. 

The two for the B. S. in Economic? 
are: 

Paul Bennor Piersol, Norman Fran 
cis Wheeler. 

And from the Conservatory of 
Music, Grace Elizabeth Daniel will 
receive the Conservatory of Musi ' 
diploma. 



Monday afternoon will be the 
annual ■ Ivy Oration. The hour has 
n ot yet been decided, but will be an- 
1 nounced later. 

One of the most memorable and 
I beautiful traditions of Lebanon Val- 
| ley College is that of the Ivy Oration 
i a nd Ivy planting. All the ivy which 
beautifies our campus buildings and 
a dds to them a heritage of romance 
w ere planted by the classess which 
have gone out from here in the year c 
Past. These graduates come back to 
their Alma Mater and see the ivy 
which their class planted clinging to 
the buildings as a sacred memory. 

Mr. Walter Pugh will be the Ivy 
Pator at the planting when the Class 
°f '28 upholds this ancient custom. 



The annual Commencement Con- 

Cer t to be given by some of the ad- 

Var tced students of the Conservatory 

Will take place on Monday eveninp 

at eight o'clock in Engle Hall. The 

FOgram has not been definitely ar- 

rari ged as yet but the well known 

N°ists, Grace Daniel. Hilda Hess 

V'ola Wolf, Myrtle Turby and Miriam 

yer are expected to appear. There 

Will be organ, voice and piano solo r 

^ Well as organ and piano duets. / 

ltle program is assured to all thos > 

avail themselves of the oppor- 

u,1it .v to hear the last recital of the 
Vear. 



SENIOR CAST GIVES 

AN EXCELLENT PLAY 

(Continued from page 1) 



or, which would insure the penniless 
major of steady funds. A forty year 
old spinster strives for perpetual 
"sweet sixteen" with the aid of rouge 
and hair dye, but the loveless years 
have made her catty. The remote fe- 
male relative of a nobleman is snob- 
bishly aloof of her fellow-boarders. 
A Jew who sell worthless stocks, his 
"buddy", an artist, and the scullery 
maid with a pessimistic philosophy 
complete the household. 

A stranger comes to rent the room 
on the third floor back. His radiant 
personality amazes each one of them 
as he looks into their faces. His eyes 
seem to search for and find the dross 
which they have accumulated within 
themselves. By his kindly insinua- 
tions he shows them one by one not 
only what miserable creatures they 
now are, but also what happy souls 
they might become. The play ends 
with perfect harmony reigning in the 
plain but happy living-room after 
each of the boarders has found his 
better self by the friendly guidance 
f the passerby. 

The cast was not only well chosen 
but the production was an excellent 
niece of amateur work. Pass Boll- 
inger as the Jew created much laugh- 
ter with his Yiddish accent and make- 
up. Bruce Behney and Catherine 
Craven, as the major and his wife, 
gave a realistic portrayal of a quarrel- 
some couple. Viola Wolfe as the 
•andlady and Nelda Spatz as the 
slavey were splendid in their roles. 
One of the mast effective pieces of 
stagecraft in the whole play, and for 
which the director and the actor, 
Walter Pugh, deserve much credit, 
was the crucial moment when the 
stranger first enters the living-room 
and he exerts his magnetic influence 
for the first time. He comes face to 
face with the major's daughter an.l 
she seems stunned by his searching 
eyes that awaken the better things 
lying dormant in her. 

The director of the play, H. Darkes 
Albright, worked up a splendid pro- 
duction and the whole cast gave fine 
interpretations of their roles. It was 
an achievement that should be an in- 
centive for all senior classes in the 
future to produce their plays with 
seniors in entire charge. 



NEW OFFICERS ARE 

ELECTED BY GROUPS 



At a recent meeting of the Student 
Volunteer Association, the following 
members were elected officers for 
next year: 

President. Miss Edna Lang; Sec- 
Treas., Miss Ruth Strubhar. 

The Prayer Meeting Association 
elected Miss Ruth Cooper and Mr. 
James Hazelton chairmen for next 
year. 

MISS M. E. ENGLE, \U 

RETURNS TO SCHOOL 



Everyone is glad to know that one 
of our North Hall Freshman, Mary 
Elizabeth Engie of Palmyra has re- 
turned to her studies after an oper- 
ation for appendicitis which was per- 
formed in the Hershey Hospital. Miss 
Engle has been in fine health since 
her illness and will finish her school 
year with her class. 



Plans for the Baccalaureate service 
to be held in the College Church or 
Sunday morning, June 10, have bey" 
completed. The Conservatory has 
arranged a very impressive musical 
program. A mixed choir of college 
students under the direction of Prof. 
Crawford, will give two anthems and 
Mrs. Edith Frantz Mills will have 8 
solo number. The organ will be plav- 
ed by Prof. Campbell. 

As previously announced the bac- 
calaureate sermon will be delivered 
by Dr. C. C. Gohn, B.S. '02, pastor of 
the First U. B. Church of Johnstown, 
Penna. 



In And About The Literary Societies 



CLIONIAN 



After very close balloting the Clio 
nian Literary Society choose Leah 
Harpel to fill the important office of 
the first president as well as anniver- 
sary president for next year. Kathi"< 
Bork, whose originality is well known 
on the campus, will be chairman of 
the program committee since she was 
elected Vice President. 

The other girls elected were Leah 
Miller, Secretary; Pauline Schaeffer. 
Corresponding Secretary; Ruth Es- 
sick, Treasurer; Miriam Muth, Critic; 
Mildred Myers, Chaplain; and Doro- 
thy Eldridge, Pianist. 



SOCITIES MEET IN 

TWO JOINT SESSIONS 

(Continued from Page 1) 



personations were extremely clever 
and the impersonators seemed to have 
learned the Profs' characteristics. 

Alice Kindt played the part of our 
ibrarian, Miss Myers while Madame 
Bennet suffered at the hands of Cor- 
rinne Dyne. A most life-like por- 
trayal of Madame Green was render- 
ed by Catherine Craven. And then 
the male members of the faculty re- 
ceived their turn. Sara Lou Rose 
gave a glimpse of Prof. Grimm while 
Dr. Bennet's ideas were presented by 
Edna Early. Mae Hamer enlightened 
the girls on various subjects by some 
of Dr. Reynold's statistics. Better 
pictures of Dr. Butterwick and Dr. 
Gingrich could not be presented those 
given by Blanche Cochran and Biliie 
Umholtz, The affair came to a close 
after refreshments were, enjoyed. 



Kalo and Philo met in their Annual 
joint-meeting, Friday, May 25. Al- 
though the program was short, it 
was both amusing and instructive. 
Albert Miller started the ball rolling 
with a humorous reading. Carl Heil- 
man gave a very instructive talk on 
"Bees." "Travels of Paul Bunyon" by 
James Hazelton presented traditions of 
the people in Montana. James Wal- 
lace gave an interesting talk or 
"Memorial Day." His theme was the 
origin of the holiday at the request of 
General Hogan. A few witty remarks 
about preachers added spice to the 
discourse. The meeting then turned 
from the literary to the social. Re- 
freshments were served and, as usual 
went over "big." 



CLASS DAY WILL BE 

ENTERTAINING AFFAIR 

(Continued From Page 1) 



ledge is Virtue," and "Domesti City.' 

According to the program the third 
part of the exercises is "Reality". 
This will include the class poem by 
Alice Kindt, the Mantle Oration by 
(Mr. Milford Knisley, President of the 
Class of '28); and the Acceptance by 
Frederic Miller, President of the Clas. 
of '29. 

Then in the fourth part of the pro- 
gram Elmer Keiser as Chief Executor 
of the class will read the last will and 
testament presenting everything tha' 
they have left over and don't need 
The reporter was informed that there 
were no unpaid bills to pass on.) 

The traditional Daisy Chain Pro- 
cession will close the exercises. The 
Daisy Chain will be presented to the 
Class of '28 by the Class of '30, thei.' 
most loyal cousins. 

The Annual Alumni reception will 
be held at the home of Dr. and Mrs. 
G. D. Gossard immediately after the 
Class Day exercises on Tuesday after 
noon, June 12. All the alumni and 
their friends are cordially invited to 
come and renew old friendships. 



DELPHIAN 

At a recent business meeting of the 
Delphian Literary Society the follow- 
ing officers were elected for the year 
1928-1929. 

President Mildred Lane; Vice Presi- 
dent, Anna Apgar; Critic, Mae Hamer; 
Corresponding Sec, Grace Keihner; 
Recording Sec, Dorothy Heister; 
Treasurer, Ruth Cooper; Pianist, Olive 
Weigel; Chaplain, Katherine Bowers; 
and Warden, Dorothy Thompson. 



At a recent business meeting of the 
Readers' Club in North Hall Parlor 
the following officers were elected 
for next year. President, Miles Kiehn- 
er; Vice President, Ruth Strubhar; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Mary Hartz; and 
chairman of the program committee 
Alcesta Slichter. Every member of 
Readers' Club is urged to have sug- 
gestions ready to offer at a meeting 
to be held in the near future regard- 
ing what the club should read next 
year. All people who have not paid 
dues are requested to pay them to 
Mrs. Hammond as soon as possible. 



MANY SENIORS TO 

TEACH NEXT YEAR 

(Continued from page 1) 



Roy Flinchbaugh, industrial chem- 
ist at Lancaster, Pa. 

Earl Fornwalt, assistant secretary 
of Y. M. C. A. at Lebanon, Pa. 

Mary Geyer will teach at Deushore, 
Penna. 

Edna Graham will teach at Cone- 
maugh, Pa. 

Mabel Hafer will teach at Lititz, Pa. 

Jacob Horst will teach at Middle- 
town, Pa. 

Raymond Koch will teach at Her- 
minie, Pa. 

Milford Knisley will teach at Tower 
City, Pa. 

Earl Kuhnert will teach at Meshop- 
pen, Pa. 

Frances Long will teach at Audo- 
bon, N. J. 

Emma Meyer will teach at Annville. 
Penna. 

Millard Miller will teach at Her- 
shey, Penna. 

Harvey Nitrauer will teach at Corn- 
wall, Penna. 

Sarah Lou Rose will teach at 
McKeesport, Pa. 

Elsie Reider will teach at Harris- 
burg, Pa. 

Homer Schwalm will teach at High- 
spire, Pa. 

M. Nelda Spatz will teach at Lititz. 
Penna. 

Eleanor Snoke will teach at Willow, 
Grove, Pa. 

Ruby Ann See will teach at Roa- 
noke, Va. 

Irene Schell will teach at Mount 
Aetna, Pa. 

James Wallace will teach at Harris- 
burg, Pa. 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville _ _ _ _ Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Strett 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

KODAKS & SUPPLIES, FILMS. 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING- 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Printing — Publishing; 
Advertising 
Annville Penna. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. B ASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 



THE HUB 



713 Cumberland Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



PHOTOGRAPHS Paraphs of Quality 

S&eForcver BLAZIER & MILLER 

36 North Eighth Street. LEBANON. PA. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 



Alumni Notes 



Wilber Harnish, 1910 has recently 
been elected president of Pi chapter 
of Phi Delta Kappa at the University 
of Illionos. Phi Delta Kappa is a 
national honorary Educational Fra- 
ternity. Dr. O. Edgar Reynold Head 
of the Department of Education and 
Psychology of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege is also a member of Pi chapter. 



SENIORS:— When you come to the close of your collegiate career within a 
very short time- you will leave Lebanon Valley with a certain 
feelins? of regret. But you will want to keep in touch with the 
school and its activities, so we ask you to (ill in the blank below 
and give it to Harry L. Hovis with $1.00. 
ALUMNI: La Vie Collegienne is the link which binds you to your Alma 
Mater, and one dollar will bring it to you for one year. Mail 
the blank and one dollar to Harry L. Hovis circulation manager, 
La Vie Collegienne, Annville, Pa. 



! 



Faculty 



Dr. Reynolds and Prof. Grimm at 
tended the conference of the educa- 
tional leaders of eastern Pennsylvania 
held in Reading on May 28. The dis- 
cussion centered about the entrance 
requirements for college freshmen 
and the great percentage of students 
that are dropped each year from the 
freshman class. 



President G. D. Gossard was th 
commencement orator last week ai 
the graduation exercises of the Stras- 
burg High School, Lancaster County, 
and of the Elizabethville High School. 
Dauphin County. He will also aH 
dress the graduates of the Minersville 
High School at their Commencement 
on June 14. 




The Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. Cabinets 
met in joint session to discuss plan 
for the coming year and the staff foi 
the new "Y" Handbook — "Freshmar 
Bible" — was elected as follows: Edi 
tor, John W. Beattie; Associate Edi 
tors, Kathryn Bork and Harry Hovis 



Be sure that I receive La Vie Collegienne regularly during 1928-29 
at the following address: 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 



Upholding the custom of thi: 
school,, which has been to send rep 
resentatives to the annual joint Y. W 
and Y. M. conference held at Eagle? 
Mere, the usual number of delegate? 
have signed contracts. The Eagle 
Mere conference is one of all the col- 
lege Y. W. and Y. Ms. in the Middle 
Atlantic States. 

Miss Snoke will attend the confer 
ence, since she has been honored witl 
the tasks of formulating the plans fV 
the affair as chairlady of the execu 
tive board. 

The Y. W. C. A. will be represent- 
ed by Alcesta Slichter, Kathryn Bork 
Ruth Cooper and Sarah Ensmingc 
while the delegates for the Y. M. will 
be Paul Barnhart, Lawrence Derrick- 
son and Robert Roudabush. 



MYLINMEN END 

SUCCESSFUL SEASON 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Piela won four games and lost two. 
He struck out fifty-three men and 
walked thirty-five. Zappia won siv 
games, lost one and tied one. He 
struck out thirty-three batsmen and 
walked twenty-one. Joe Abrahams 
lost one game as a relief pitcher. He 
walked one man. Besides excelled 
pitching, the staff hit consistently anr 3 
made themselves prominent in the 
batting averages. 

Bendigo successor to Chief Me 
toxin, ably filled the position of hi? 
fore runner behind the bat. Bendigo 
has proven himself by whacking out 
home runs par excellance and main 
taining a general batting average a- 
mohg the leaders. The infield, with 
the exception of Pier sol received new 
material and a change of position 
Disney covered second base like a 
veteran; Wentz was shifted from 
third to short stop to fill the positio • 
vacated by Charlie Gelbert, now with 
the Rochester International League 
club. Jacks performed at third base 
for the season. He, too, was a new 
man, and played his position well. 
The outfield was quite •egulai 
throughout the season. Zappia and 



8 


21 


.338 


11 


20 


.327 


8 


20 


.327 


11 


21 


.318 


11 


15 


.312 


2 


7 


.309 


13 


15 


.268 


9 


15 


.238 


9 


8 


.195 


2 


6 


.171 








.oor 


1 





.001 


85 


198 


.27., 



Piela shared in left field honors. AI 
bright covered center field, while Joe 
Abrahams and Snyder alternated in 
right field. 

Over the combined hits of the or 
ponents the Lebanon Valley players 
showed an advantage of twenty-one 
hits, the numbers being 148 to 127. 
Bendigo led his club in home-run hit- 
ting with Albright a close second. Al- 
bright led in triples and Zappia was 
master of the two-baggers. Piela and 
Wentz tied for the largest number of 
singles, both having poled out four- 
teen safeties. The batting average 
for the entire team floats around .279. 

In view of the schedule which the 
club filled, the season has been a re- 
markable one. Schuylkill was trounc- 
ed twice, as was Bucknell and Susque- 
hanna. Lafayette, State, Ursinus Villa 
Nova, and Mt. St. Mary's were the 
teams which bested the Blue and 
White. Western Maryland furnished 
one of the tightest games of the sea- 
ion. 

The individual batting averages: — 
AB R H Ave 

Wentz 62 

Bendigo 61 

Piela 61 

Albright 67 

Zappia 48 

Snyder 23 

Disney 38 

Piersol 63 

Jacks 41 

Abrahams 35 

Wood 1 

Groman 5 

Team 525 

Annville, Pa. May 23. 

The second tilt with the Readint 
Lions again proved disastrous to th' 
Orange and Black here today wher 
Yetzer was nipped for twelve bingles 
including a homer by Bendigo anc 
•?very man on the Lebanon Vallej 
batting list played premier ball. 

Albright started the hitting for the 
locals with a single. Disney follower 1 
and Bendigo's round-trip drive chalk- 
ed up a total of three runs for the 
first inning.. 

The second inning gave both team? 
a run, Snyder's single being scored 
>n Jack's walk and Albright's line 
drive. Kopp did the scoring for 
Schuylkill. The third and fourth were 
vacant for both sides, and while Pielr 
did not allow a hit during this time. 
Zappia rung up his second two-bagger 
and Jacks a single. Bendigo started 
the scoring in the fifth with a single 
followed by Piela's triple. Piela 
crossed the plate for the final run on 
Piersol's clean hit. For the rest of 
the game, Lebanon Valley rode thru 
on its runs. Roth for Schuylkill wa? 
tagged at home in the fifth when 
trying to stretch a triple into a cir- 
cuit clout. 

Schuylkill seriously threatened in 
the sixth, when two runs were put 
over. The eighth brought in another 
run on a walk, but the final score of 
the ninth put Lebanon Valley on the 
front side of a 6-4 score. 

The score by innings: 

Sch. 1 2 1 0—4 8 1 

L. V. C. __3 1 2 x 6 12 1 

Batteries — Yetzer and Kopp; Pieln 
and Bendigo. 

Selinsgrove, Pa., May 25. 

A return game with Susquehanna 
University here this afternoon gave 
Lebanon Valley its fifth consecutive- 



win since its first game with this 
school. Disney joined the home-run 
race to help the visiting club whack 
out as many hits in its second meet- 
ing as in its first conclave, the total 
being sixteen. Susquehanna's hitting 
was ineffectual, except in two in- 
stances when four singles and a walk 
brought in three runs and a triple 
pushed over a fourth. 

In the second frame Piela and Pier- 
sol doubled and were scored on 
Grace's error. The third inning put 
Disney among the scorers, making a 
score of 3-0. Zappia blanked the 
homesters until the fifth when three 
runs were scored. Jack's double, and 
Disney's home run in the fifth put 
Lebanon V allay into a lead which it 
retained for the remainder of the 
game. Albright, Piersol and Bendigo 
on a double, a single, and a triple re- 
spectively, boosted the score to eight 
in the last three frames. Bachman's 
triple in the ninth was the beginning 
of an attempted r^lly, but his scoring 
was sufficient only to give the home 
club an 8-4 break. 

The score by innings: 
L. V. C. __0 2 1 2 1 1 1—8 16 1 
Sus. U. ___0 3 1—4 7 1 

Batteries — Zappia and Bendigo; 
Donnell and Baird. 
State College, Pa., May 26. 

Lebanon Valley's last game of its 
up-State trip resulted in its first de- 
feat in six starts, but the game did 
more credit to the visitors than to 
the winners. Even tho the advantage 
of three runs appeared apalling, the 
home team had the biggest difficulty 
in carrying off a victory, which was 
not certain until the latter half of the 
ninth. 

To open the fracas Albright walked 
and Disney singled, but both were 
caught on base. Wentz's cut at the 
ball was a fielders choice, but the side 
retired when Bendigo was thrown out 
from third to first. For State, Kent 
died to Wentz and Doffelar was 
thrown out from short to home. Lun- 
gren scored on Jack's error, Delp on 
a walk and Lesko was driven in on 
Jacobson's single. State retired on 
Harrington's fly to Jacks. In the sec- 
ond inning Piela singled and Zappia 
poled out his seventh double of the 
season, but the men were left on base 
when Abrahams and Jacks fanned 
Albright started the third with his 
third home run for the year, breaking 



the ice for the visitors. In this same 
frame State got two more runs on 
two errors a hit and a walk, but wert; 
blanked for the rest of the game un- 
til the winning pass in the ninth. In 
the fourth Zappia scored on a walk 
and in the fifth he and Piela came 
home on Snyder's elouble. In the 
sixth Bendigo added another homer 
to his credit. 

The Lebanon Valley battery work- 
ed smoothly, but a total of lour errors 
for Mylin's field protegees stole the 
game. To the home team's eleven 
hits the visitors turned in ten. 

The score by innings: 
L. V. C. __0 1 1 2 1 0-5 10 4 

State 3 2 1—6 11 1 

Batteries— Piela and Bendigo; Van- 
atta and Harrington. 
Annville, Pa., June 2, 1928. 

Lebanon Valley wound up one of 
its most successful base-ball season:; 
in years by whipping Mt. St. Mary's 
in the reurn game of the season. St. 
Patrick's neophytes were forced to 
accept the defeat of a revenge game 
even tho the opposition they offered 
gave them the lead once in the game 
Lebanon Valley started the .'coring 
on Albright's single and Mc Gai'i 
gan's error. Wentz sacrificed to cen- 
ter field; Bendigo made first on 
Traceys error and three runs came in 
on Zappia's single. The visiting team 
was held scoreless until Kender was 
driven home on Connell's double. For 
Mt. St. Mary's, Dooley, McGarrigan 
and Raposcavage did the scoring to 
place the opposition in the lead by 
one run. The locals came back strong, 
however when Snyder singled, Jacks 
walked and Albright hit a slashing 
double to center to score his team- 
mates. "Jappie" was tagged at third 
when trying to stretch his hit into a 
triple. The seventh brought in two 
more runs for Lebanon Valley, and 
the eighth brought Mt. St. Mary's 
total up to 6. 

The score by innings: 
Mt. St. M. 1 1 2 2 0—6 10 6 
L. V. C. __3 2 2 2 x— 9 9 
Batteries — Lenahan, Valibos and 
Hemler; Zappia and Bendigo. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumlir and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 
TTMTnM iriuof ™ VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 

UNION EMBLEM CO palmyra, pa. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS-TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 

HARRY W. LIGHT 

43 EAST MAIN STREET, ANNVILLE. PA-